OT - More Good Vaccine News

RedCap

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This morning Moderna now is reporting that its early Phase 3 Covid-19 vaccine is around 94.5% effective. That follows on the earlier report from Pfizer that its vaccine is 90% or better effective. Truly good and unexpected results for the effectiveness of these vaccines.

Now the government needs to act expeditiously with urgency to get the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines approved and out to the public as the virus rages on in record surges.

Yes, anti-vaxers don't have to get the vaccine shots (their choice) but the rest of us are waiting anxiously. I'll personally be near the first in line as soon as they will let me get it.

Are there some potential vaccine risks? Of course as with any vaccine. BUT there also seem to be growing concerns about bad long term effects of Covid-19 infections even for those people who are asymptomatic or have a very mild case. So weigh your risks and decide what you think is least risky for you.

Moderna Vaccine Update
 
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drubendall

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This is remarkable! Regular flu vaccine is rarely better than 40%. It's like we haven't been trying all of these years.
 
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RedCap

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It’s also important to know what potential risks there is taking this vaccine...

We should be told what the risks are, that would help ease making the decision...
Unfortunately the long term risks for either the vaccines or getting the virus won't be known for some time - maybe months or likely years in both cases.

Here's what Moderna said: The Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company also said there were no “significant” safety concerns, adding the vaccine was generally safe and well-tolerated with the majority of adverse events in participants being labeled as mild or moderate. Side effects included pain at the injection site and, after the second dose, fatigue, muscle pain and headaches.

Sadly life is not without risk even when you drive a car or a truck you're taking a risk.
 
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Lincoln100

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This morning Moderna now is reporting that its early Phase 3 Covid-19 vaccine is around 94.5% effective. That follows on the earlier report from Pfizer that its vaccine is 90% or better effective. Truly good and unexpected results for the effectiveness of these vaccines.

Now the government needs to act expeditiously with urgency to get the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines approved and out to the public as the virus rages on in record surges.

Yes, anti-vaxers don't have to get the vaccine shots (their choice) but the rest of us are waiting anxiously. I'll personally be near the first in line as soon as they will let me get it.

Are there some potential vaccine risks? Of course as with any vaccine. BUT there also seem to be growing concerns about bad long term effects of Covid-19 infections even for those people who are asymptomatic or have a very mild case. So weigh your risks and decide what you think is least risky for you.

Moderna Vaccine Update

Dumb. No more effective than a mask.
 

scarletred

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Unfortunately the long term risks for either the vaccines or getting the virus won't be known for some time - maybe months or likely years in both cases.

Here's what Moderna said: The Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company also said there were no “significant” safety concerns, adding the vaccine was generally safe and well-tolerated with the majority of adverse events in participants being labeled as mild or moderate. Side effects included pain at the injection site and, after the second dose, fatigue, muscle pain and headaches.

Sadly life is not without risk even when you drive a car or a truck you're taking a risk.

Well the risks at the beginning are just injection pain with muscle pain, and a headaches those don’t appear to be very bad side effect.. But you’re right it might take years to find out worse risks of the vaccine..
 
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nwualum

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Anyone had the shingles vaccine? Yikes. I was really tired for a day after receiving it, but my sister thought she had the flu for 2-3 days. That can knock you out. But its a lot better than getting the disease. Vaccines may have a couple of negatives but they are far outweighed by the positives. I'm definitely getting it.
 

scarletred

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Anyone had the shingles vaccine? Yikes. I was really tired for a day after receiving it, but my sister thought she had the flu for 2-3 days. That can knock you out. But its a lot better than getting the disease. Vaccines may have a couple of negatives but they are far outweighed by the positives. I'm definitely getting it.

I had a relative that said the same thing about the shingles shot... She thought she might be getting Covid because of the side effects so she went and had a Covid test..
 

RedCap

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Anyone had the shingles vaccine? Yikes. I was really tired for a day after receiving it, but my sister thought she had the flu for 2-3 days. That can knock you out. But its a lot better than getting the disease. Vaccines may have a couple of negatives but they are far outweighed by the positives. I'm definitely getting it.
Everyone has a different reaction to the shingles shot. I had almost no reaction myself - just very minor injection site pain that I even only felt if I touched the injection site. But I have a cousin who was sick as a dog in bed for two days from the shots.

You're right though if you've ever known someone who had shingles, it's not a pretty thing. And the shingles vaccine isn't 100% effective either but it gives you much better odds of not getting shingles.
 

NikkiSixx

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This is remarkable! Regular flu vaccine is rarely better than 40%. It's like we haven't been trying all of these years.
I don't know much about vaccines, but these new ones by Pfizer and Moderna are using what is called mRNA to deliver the vaccine. This is a new approach to vaccines that is unlike traditional ones.

There are some concerns about safely being able to deliver the vaccine inside a synthesized protein that ones' body does not attack.

I am especially suspect of Moderna's vaccine, as that company has a litany of bad news around it, along with hungry shareholders.

The Pfizer vaccine, I would take.
 

drubendall

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I don't know much about vaccines, but these new ones by Pfizer and Moderna are using what is called mRNA to deliver the vaccine. This is a new approach to vaccines that is unlike traditional ones.

There are some concerns about safely being able to deliver the vaccine inside a synthesized protein that ones' body does not attack.

I am especially suspect of Moderna's vaccine, as that company has a litany of bad news around it, along with hungry shareholders.

The Pfizer vaccine, I would take.
Which one does Dr Doom have stock options in?
 

dinglefritz

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This is remarkable! Regular flu vaccine is rarely better than 40%. It's like we haven't been trying all of these years.
It's a different deal between Influenza and COVID. With flu there are nearly completely different multiple strains out there that we have to guess which one is going to be prevalent. Even then Influenza's antigenic drift seems to happen more quickly than some other viruses. IMO, this vaccine will work well and remain effective for a number of years with some minor tweaks along the way. IMO, we would be better off with a whole virus killed vaccine than some of the more highly engineered modified live ones spliced on to adenoviruses. JMO.
 

dinglefritz

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So far I heard headaches and muscle aches
In some people. Not all and it is going to vary from company to company's product. IMO, this is largely due to the carrier virus they used to splice the COVID antigens to. I would prefer a totally killed virus vaccine but I'm sure they have very good reasons for their choices.
 

dinglefritz

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Well the risks at the beginning are just injection pain with muscle pain, and a headaches those don’t appear to be very bad side effect.. But you’re right it might take years to find out worse risks of the vaccine..
I really don't think there's anything to worry about long term. We're not using live COVID genetic material in the vaccine. The odds of us getting exposed to live or dead COVID genetic materially via natural exposure is going to be nearly 100% within this next year. So, why would getting vaccinated with COVID rna pose more risk than natural exposure? Answer: It doesn't. It's far less. Get the vaccine. Period. End of discussion.
 

dinglefritz

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Honest question. When there are 2, do you get to decide which one you get? It may be a get what you get, dont throw a fit type scenario.

How does that work with vaccines available today?
You get what you can get for now and effectiveness and how smooth the vaccine is will weed out the less desirable ones. It really isn't all that much different than what we see today. If a vaccine causes too much injection pain, it gets modified. That said, no vaccine is going to get approval for use unless it works well.
 

dinglefritz

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This morning Moderna now is reporting that its early Phase 3 Covid-19 vaccine is around 94.5% effective. That follows on the earlier report from Pfizer that its vaccine is 90% or better effective. Truly good and unexpected results for the effectiveness of these vaccines.

Now the government needs to act expeditiously with urgency to get the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines approved and out to the public as the virus rages on in record surges.

Yes, anti-vaxers don't have to get the vaccine shots (their choice) but the rest of us are waiting anxiously. I'll personally be near the first in line as soon as they will let me get it.

Are there some potential vaccine risks? Of course as with any vaccine. BUT there also seem to be growing concerns about bad long term effects of Covid-19 infections even for those people who are asymptomatic or have a very mild case. So weigh your risks and decide what you think is least risky for you.

Moderna Vaccine Update
It's interesting in how much good news there is on the vaccine front ALL falling after the election. Coincidence? Nope. All of America should give Trump a thank you for kicking the CDC in the ass and funding Operation Warp Speed. Without Trump pushing the buttons this would never have gotten done.
 

JaySker402

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You get what you can get for now and effectiveness and how smooth the vaccine is will weed out the less desirable ones. It really isn't all that much different than what we see today. If a vaccine causes too much injection pain, it gets modified. That said, no vaccine is going to get approval for use unless it works well.
yup. I would assume that having 2 increases the availability as you have 2 manufacturers producing them. Do they then enlist additional labs to start producing those 2 for now?
 

RedCap

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Honest question. When there are 2, do you get to decide which one you get? It may be a get what you get, dont throw a fit type scenario.

How does that work with vaccines available today?
Initially it's probably going to be based on availability. There won't be enough doses to go around in the beginning so you probably have to take whatever you can get or wait. When/if multiple vaccines become widely available then your doctor can help you decide what's best in your case which could depend on age, underlying health conditions, etc.

One difference between the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines is the required storage temperature. Pfizer's version requires a much, much lower storage temperature than that of Moderna so storage capability at the vaccination site could be a factor.
 

JaySker402

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So, assume that first rounds will go to High Risk and Medical professionals. Then some of the essential workers. Maybe teachers (and hopefully their families) get in that round.

If they want schools to stay (re) open, they will want to ensure that the teachers are vaccinated, as there is a shortage of subs, so every teacher out can impact if a school can open.
 

dinglefritz

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yup. I would assume that having 2 increases the availability as you have 2 manufacturers producing them. Do they then enlist additional labs to start producing those 2 for now?
Supposedly once several of the company's had successful early trials they started manufacturing and packaging vaccine to be ready to ship when approval was granted. The director of Operation Warp Speed won't say exactly how many doses are already in the tank waiting to be shipped but my suspicion is millions if not tens of millions. The feds are funding this and the companies are paid up front to develop and package the vaccine.

My spouse still says the state department of health says we'll be vaccinating nursing home patients and medical personnel by the end of November. I don't remember off the top of my head how many doses that would take. Then once they work through that, smilar to flu vaccine they'll prioritize who gets vaccinated next. I believe there's probably 10-20 millions doses in the pipeline and the Operation Warp Speed director says they already have in place shipping protocols with Fed-Ex. This is not nearly as daunting of a task as the knuckleheads on CNN and MSNBC keep screeching.

I'm serious when I say regardless of party affiliation the country should be giving Trump a little credit for getting this done. There is no way in hell a traditional politician would have rattled enough cages in the bureaucracy to get a vaccine done in time to do us any good. Say what you want about Trump, he got things done.
 

dinglefritz

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So, assume that first rounds will go to High Risk and Medical professionals. Then some of the essential workers. Maybe teachers (and hopefully their families) get in that round.

If they want schools to stay (re) open, they will want to ensure that the teachers are vaccinated, as there is a shortage of subs, so every teacher out can impact if a school can open.
IF you're not in a high risk age or health category, a teacher won't get priority IMO. Let's face it. Most teachers probably will have been exposed by the end of November. This deal is running rampant throughout the country. Some of the areas showing the lowest level of increase in cases are doing so because they already have such a high population immunity. Hell last April, testing revealed a 70% antibody positivity rate in the Bronx, NY.
 
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RedCap

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Supposedly once several of the company's had successful early trials they started manufacturing and packaging vaccine to be ready to ship when approval was granted. The director of Operation Warp Speed won't say exactly how many doses are already in the tank waiting to be shipped but my suspicion is millions if not tens of millions. The feds are funding this and the companies are paid up front to develop and package the vaccine.

My spouse still says the state department of health says we'll be vaccinating nursing home patients and medical personnel by the end of November. I don't remember off the top of my head how many doses that would take. Then once they work through that, smilar to flu vaccine they'll prioritize who gets vaccinated next. I believe there's probably 10-20 millions doses in the pipeline and the Operation Warp Speed director says they already have in place shipping protocols with Fed-Ex. This is not nearly as daunting of a task as the knuckleheads on CNN and MSNBC keep screeching.

I'm serious when I say regardless of party affiliation the country should be giving Trump a little credit for getting this done. There is no way in hell a traditional politician would have rattled enough cages in the bureaucracy to get a vaccine done in time to do us any good. Say what you want about Trump, he got things done.
Well here's the government line on vaccine availability:

Between Moderna and Pfizer, Azar told CNBC there will be roughly 40 million doses of vaccine available by the end of this year, enough to inoculate about 20 million people since both vaccines require two shots. The goal is to provide enough coronavirus vaccine doses to all Americans who want to be vaccinated against the disease by the second quarter of 2021, Azar said.
 
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dinglefritz

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Well here's the government line on vaccine availability:

Between Moderna and Pfizer, Azar told CNBC there will be roughly 40 million doses of vaccine available by the end of this year, enough to inoculate about 20 million people since both vaccines require two shots. The goal is to provide enough coronavirus vaccine doses to all Americans who want to be vaccinated against the disease by the second quarter of 2021, Azar said.
Hm. Man I make good guesses. I just posted 20 million in the pipeline as a guess earlier in this thread. Meanwhile the manufacturing lines are running night and day producing millions more. The actual vaccine and container it comes in costs virtually nothing compared to all of the other costs associated with making a vaccine. There's no reason to not be making vaccine as rapidly as we can given the positive early trials reinforced by these last trials.

Make no mistake, they're 2 does vaccines BUT that first dose is going to offer some degree of protection to the point that somebody is asymptomatic.

IMO, maybe a bigger game changer is the approval of the monoclonal antibody treatment that Trump got for COVID. That's a silver bullet when combined with low dose steroids.
 
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RedCap

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Hm. Man I make good guesses. I just posted 20 million in the pipeline as a guess earlier in this thread. Meanwhile the manufacturing lines are running night and day producing millions more. The actual vaccine and container it comes in costs virtually nothing compared to all of the other costs associated with making a vaccine. There's no reason to not be making vaccine as rapidly as we can given the positive early trials reinforced by these last trials.
Actually there could be more doses of other vaccines since there are other vaccine candidates in Phase 3 as well. Don't know how effective those other vaccines will be yet but we should know before too long whether they will be effective. Likely though that any of those will not be any more effective than the Pfizer/Moderna vaccines. Over 90% is a pretty high benchmark.

I count 3 other vaccines that are relevant to U.S. usage to be in Phase 3 trials: AstraZeneca, J&J and Noravax.
 
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Bugeater

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latest

Here's the vaccine, with possible side effects:

maxresdefault.jpg
 

dinglefritz

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Actually there could be more doses of other vaccines since there are other vaccine candidates in Phase 3 as well. Don't know how effective those other vaccines will be yet but we should know before too long whether they will be effective. Likely though that any of those will not be any more effective than the Pfizer/Moderna vaccines. Over 90% is a pretty high benchmark.
They'll work well also. Personally I'm hoping to get one of the "others" which are a completely killed vaccine but I'll take what I can get as soon as I can get it. I fully expect that actual real world immunity will be higher than 90%. Corona viruses are a fairly easy virus to build a vaccine for IF you have a specific strain you're targeting which we are.
 

mwulf

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I had signed up and was accepted for the Moderna trial in Omaha. Had to pull out due to the travel needed to finish it. It was a 26 month type trial. Friend is in it but was given the placebo. Ill take whatever they have if it allows me to travel internationally.
 

little a

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Hm. Man I make good guesses. I just posted 20 million in the pipeline as a guess earlier in this thread. Meanwhile the manufacturing lines are running night and day producing millions more. The actual vaccine and container it comes in costs virtually nothing compared to all of the other costs associated with making a vaccine. There's no reason to not be making vaccine as rapidly as we can given the positive early trials reinforced by these last trials.

Make no mistake, they're 2 does vaccines BUT that first dose is going to offer some degree of protection to the point that somebody is asymptomatic.

IMO, maybe a bigger game changer is the approval of the monoclonal antibody treatment that Trump got for COVID. That's a silver bullet when combined with low dose steroids.

Regeneron?
 

inWV

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I don't know much about vaccines, but these new ones by Pfizer and Moderna are using what is called mRNA to deliver the vaccine. This is a new approach to vaccines that is unlike traditional ones.

There are some concerns about safely being able to deliver the vaccine inside a synthesized protein that ones' body does not attack.

I am especially suspect of Moderna's vaccine, as that company has a litany of bad news around it, along with hungry shareholders.

The Pfizer vaccine, I would take.
Two vaccines, same mRNA platform. Pfizer's vaccine will be more logistically difficult to deliver, as it requires ultra-low temps for storage, whereas the Moderna vaccine requires -20C. The NIH had a committee conduct an independent analysis of Moderna's data.
 
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