Will we have fully electric cars/grids in your lifetime?

BigCL24

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I just can't see the widescale benefits being cost effective yet, although I've read the new battery technologies are quite amazing.
 

Redd Webster

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Lots of changes.
* No large family encyclopedia in the house to do reports
* No Wall phone with Dad yelling at you if it is a long distance call.
* Rabbit ears to cable to streaming with rabbit ears.
* Being able to communicate with someone across the world in a touch of a button.

Lots of changes. Would not be surprised what comes next.
 

Pueblodoc

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You would have to figure out how to charge the battery faster. No one is going to want to wait an hour to charge because there's a line st every charging station. All day trips would be even more miserable.
 

BigCL24

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You would have to figure out how to charge the battery faster. No one is going to want to wait an hour to charge because there's a line st every charging station. All day trips would be even more miserable.

this Is my biggest hold up what if I got the kids in the car
 
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Huskerbeast

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If so you’ll see what happened in Texas this winter be very common.
You’ll essentially have to have dual power sources available. The fossil fuel portion will have to be on standby at all times and not be under built like it was in Texas. It will have to support the whole power load if called upon. And if that is necessary I’m sure all the other infrastructure won’t be ready.
will have to have a huge amount of coal and gas on standby to support the demand. I just don’t see how it would work.
Maybe with Nuclear plants on standby but the cost of the whole set up will be more than double what they’re doing now. It’s going to be expensive as Hell!
 

HUSKER10

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The next big issue will be disposing of the millions of batteries and solar panels.

Also, the Feds will do a study that finds the batteries emit some sort of toxic chemical or something like that. No matter what the forward progress we make, congress uses the same playbook to create public concern. That concern makes money and divides the political parties. I hate to say that but it's the reality.

To answer the question, yes we will be entirely reliant on non-fossil fuel energy at some point. I personally do not think it will be solar or battery. It will be something like Nuclear Fusion to create large sums of energy. Certainly won't be in my lifetime and unfortunately, we will exchange one problem with another problem.
 

Jaemekon

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Probably not before I die. But flying cars will maybe, eventually be a thing. It doesn't really affect me, so I don't have a serious response to it.
 
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BigCL24

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Lots of changes.
* No large family encyclopedia in the house to do reports
* No Wall phone with Dad yelling at you if it is a long distance call.
* Rabbit ears to cable to streaming with rabbit ears.
* Being able to communicate with someone across the world in a touch of a button.

Lots of changes. Would not be surprised what comes next.

video games that we download from the sky instead of buying at the store in cartridges
 

BigCL24

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The next big issue will be disposing of the millions of batteries and solar panels.

Also, the Feds will do a study that finds the batteries emit some sort of toxic chemical or something like that. No matter what the forward progress we make, congress uses the same playbook to create public concern. That concern makes money and divides the political parties. I hate to say that but it's the reality.

To answer the question, yes we will be entirely reliant on non-fossil fuel energy at some point. I personally do not think it will be solar or battery. It will be something like Nuclear Fusion to create large sums of energy. Certainly won't be in my lifetime and unfortunately, we will exchange one problem with another problem.

nuclear energy seems to be the way to go but Chernobyl has people scared we'll all die
 

aksarben77

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Depends on how much taxation will be used to subsidize. If the country goes total electric and solar, say bye bye to your hard earned dollars.
 
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Zagsker87

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What about spare batteries that you could exchange? Would that solve long trip issues? I’m speaking with close to zero knowledge of cars or engineering experience….maybe a dumb thought
 
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BigCL24

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I LOL at wind powering our whole country

tenor.gif
 

Wils97

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If the US doesn’t figure out that this is the future…someone else will. They’ll get there first. The Chinese, the Europeans, India…they are much more serious about investing money in this development than we are at the moment.

Charging, storage, collection…these are all frontiers to be overcome. Cleaner, faster, and better breakthroughs are inevitable.
 

Nebraska Squid

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I hope not. Cost (Car, battery, electricity, repair and time) is just going to be another thing that takes away from my retirement.
 

cwessel76

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If the US doesn’t figure out that this is the future…someone else will. They’ll get there first. The Chinese, the Europeans, India…they are much more serious about investing money in this development than we are at the moment.

Charging, storage, collection…these are all frontiers to be overcome. Cleaner, faster, and better breakthroughs are inevitable.
100% agree. We don’t invest in our future anymore and it will eventually come back to bite us in the ass.
 
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cwessel76

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Fully?

That's going to take 40-50 years and I'm 42... so who knows

Mostly?

Absolutely
I can see decent chunks of some suburbs being mostly to fully electric within 20 years. I have zero evidence to back that up but if certain tax credits are applied (shocker coming from me!) I can see the appeal.
 
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BigCL24

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Fully?

That's going to take 40-50 years and I'm 42... so who knows

Mostly?

Absolutely

I guess that is another question, what does "fully" electric mean? It'll take a decade for people to get completely comfortable hitting the road without gas in the tank
 

sklarbodds

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You would have to figure out how to charge the battery faster.
That's definitely coming. There's a lot of promising stuff out there.

However, I do want to point out that unless you drive long distances a lot, you'll spend less time (over a year) charging your vehicle than you will putting gas in your car because it refuels at night while you're sleeping.

I've taken a long trip in one and if you plan a stop for a meal it doesn't even seem like a big deal.


But yeah, all that being said, it's prob still the biggest hurdle.
 

sklarbodds

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I guess that is another question, what does "fully" electric mean? It'll take a decade for people to get completely comfortable hitting the road without gas in the tank
Yeah if you mean "completely replace the fleet of cars" then that just takes a long time and people will still ave the option of buying new gas cars for at least 15-20 years.

It's probably 2 decades after gas cars are no longer available that the fleet is completely replaced.
 

cwessel76

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That's definitely coming. There's a lot of promising stuff out there.

However, I do want to point out that unless you drive long distances a lot, you'll spend less time (over a year) charging your vehicle than you will putting gas in your car because it refuels at night while you're sleeping.

I've taken a long trip in one and if you plan a stop for a meal it doesn't even seem like a big deal.


But yeah, all that being said, it's prob still the biggest hurdle.
Do you own a Tesla? If so I am curious about the home charging situation. With my wife in the military and us moving frequently I am worried about getting the charging situation figured out every 3 years.
 

rss428

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You would have to figure out how to charge the battery faster. No one is going to want to wait an hour to charge because there's a line st every charging station. All day trips would be even more miserable.
The technology is already in the works. There's an Australian company making new batteries that are supposedly nearly impervious to temperature changes and will charge at much higher rates. The only downside is I believe they have a slightly lower capacity than the lithium batteries we have now.
 
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sklarbodds

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Do you own a Tesla? If so I am curious about the home charging situation. With my wife in the military and us moving frequently I am worried about getting the charging situation figured out every 3 years.
I don't...I have 6 kids (4 still in the house) so the electric options really aren't there yet for me (and I really prefer to buy used).

But one of my closest friends does and we took a trip to Colorado and it was pretty manageable.

Home charging is about a $500-1000 investment (mostly dependent on your panel setup) and not terribly ridiculous

But you can always charge on a traditional 110 too, it's just slow and you'll only recoup 30 miles overnight or so (more if you leave it 5pm - 8am or whatever)
 
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Jaemekon

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The technology is already in the works. There's an Australian company making new batteries that are supposedly nearly impervious to temperature changes and will charge at much higher rates. The only downside is I believe they have a slightly lower capacity than the lithium batteries we have now.

Graphene?
 

umpy69er

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not sure the big oil companies will let it happen anytime soon but I'd say in 50 years its possible if people can afford them
 
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Frosted Szn

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I'll go ahead and say no. I just don't see how you get past the bottle neck of cost and time versus gas powered vehicles. I'm probably wrong, but I think we continue to see gas powered vehicles into the 2030s and maybe longer.
 

Lovethehuskers

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That's definitely coming. There's a lot of promising stuff out there.

However, I do want to point out that unless you drive long distances a lot, you'll spend less time (over a year) charging your vehicle than you will putting gas in your car because it refuels at night while you're sleeping.

I've taken a long trip in one and if you plan a stop for a meal it doesn't even seem like a big deal.


But yeah, all that being said, it's prob still the biggest hurdle.
They need to find a way to charge on a 110 outlet and make it fast.
Not everyone can afford to put in new outlets. Hell they had to give away free tv antennas because people couldn't afford new tvs. IMO
 
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tkdkicks3d

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1) US power grid is to fragile to support anything remotely close to 1/2 of a regular cars let along commercial.
2) Battery duration and charging time are major limiting factors. It may work in the cities and commuters but for individuals who drive longer distances this is a no go.
3) Commercial trucking and farming are two major road blocks to an all electric grid.
4) As many stated above, unless the US embraces nuclear energy or every home has a solar grid this is not going to be an option.
 

sklarbodds

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1) US power grid is to fragile to support anything remotely close to 1/2 of a regular cars let along commercial.
The grid would need to be increased by 25% over the span of 40-50 years. We'd be fine. Yes, if everyone switched tomorrow it would be bad. But that's not a real scenario.

3) Commercial trucking and farming are two major road blocks to an all electric grid.
Commercial will go electric way before consumers. Farming you're probably right.


4) As many stated above, unless the US embraces nuclear energy or every home has a solar grid this is not going to be an option.
Not sure about that, but I am a pro nuclear guy for sure.
 

Heff'skers

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Do you own a Tesla? If so I am curious about the home charging situation. With my wife in the military and us moving frequently I am worried about getting the charging situation figured out every 3 years.
I have an electric car here in San Diego and the charging situation is super easy. I have a ton of solar panels on the house that overproduce so I can charge the car at any time practically for free. It came with a wall mounted charger and I had a buddy help me install the 240w power outlet for it. I just plug it in at night or whenever and I'm done, no more pumping gas.