Two new bombshells

Cedric

Walk On
Jun 20, 2001
194
370
63
With attention focused elsewhere, it is not surprising that a couple of recent developments have gone relatively unnoticed. But you might be interested.
1. Yesterday the NCAA Board of Governors took an extraordinary step. It not only reiterated its COVID guidelines to be met for participation this fall, it made them mandatory. This form an organization that has previously made it clear that schools and conferences decide when and under what circumstances they can play, setting forth rules regarding length of season and practice, etc. but purposely staying out of policy. So going forward, if Division I institutions decide they will go forward with a season, they will have to be in compliance with testing requirements, quarantine rules, etc. that were previously merely guidelines. If at any point during a season an institution is not meeting those guidelines, it will have to shut down its program. This is a big deal.
2. Within the last 48 hours a panel of the NInth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the O'Bannon trial judge's ruling that NCAA schools can provide unlimited benefits to student-athletes as long as the benefits are "tethered to education." This could be huge and go well beyond protractors and pencils. Consider during recruitment, School A promises to pay for a recruit to go to law school after his playing days are done. Is that a benefit "tethered to education?" Many will say yes. Theoretically, School A could promise to pay the recruit's law school tuition at School B. It still is tied to education. The NCAA has already asked the US Supreme Court for review, but the chances of that body accepting the case are slim. Things could very interesting. Stay tuned.
 

jlb321

Recruiting Coordinator
Aug 8, 2014
6,839
7,763
113
This likely effectively ends collegiate sports outside of power 5 schools that have the money and resources to comply with this

will be interesting to see where the midmajors land

ncaa already cancelled all fall championships in D2 and D3

 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: dinglefritz

RedCap

Nebraska Legend
Sep 29, 2001
71,345
14,258
113
With attention focused elsewhere, it is not surprising that a couple of recent developments have gone relatively unnoticed. But you might be interested.
1. Yesterday the NCAA Board of Governors took an extraordinary step. It not only reiterated its COVID guidelines to be met for participation this fall, it made them mandatory. This form an organization that has previously made it clear that schools and conferences decide when and under what circumstances they can play, setting forth rules regarding length of season and practice, etc. but purposely staying out of policy. So going forward, if Division I institutions decide they will go forward with a season, they will have to be in compliance with testing requirements, quarantine rules, etc. that were previously merely guidelines. If at any point during a season an institution is not meeting those guidelines, it will have to shut down its program. This is a big deal.
2. Within the last 48 hours a panel of the NInth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the O'Bannon trial judge's ruling that NCAA schools can provide unlimited benefits to student-athletes as long as the benefits are "tethered to education." This could be huge and go well beyond protractors and pencils. Consider during recruitment, School A promises to pay for a recruit to go to law school after his playing days are done. Is that a benefit "tethered to education?" Many will say yes. Theoretically, School A could promise to pay the recruit's law school tuition at School B. It still is tied to education. The NCAA has already asked the US Supreme Court for review, but the chances of that body accepting the case are slim. Things could very interesting. Stay tuned.
Maybe I'm out of touch but I thought if you offered football players benefits to come to your school the same benefit had to be made available to the general student body as well. Maybe you can offer individuals one off benefits if isn't given to the whole football team?
 
  • Like
Reactions: OzzyLvr

jlb321

Recruiting Coordinator
Aug 8, 2014
6,839
7,763
113
With regards to title IX

can a school provide testing as above to one program ie football and not offer testing for women’s sports?

can they decide we are going to compete in football but none of the other fall sports?
 
  • Like
Reactions: dinglefritz

jlb321

Recruiting Coordinator
Aug 8, 2014
6,839
7,763
113
the ncaa is a cartel, and is completely ill equipped to run major college sports

they are not long for this world. it ain’t 1930 anymore.
If schools form their own committee/league would title ix requirements still apply?
 

NikkiSixx

Graduate Assistant
Sep 14, 2013
5,463
3,584
113
This likely effectively ends collegiate sports outside of power 5 schools that have the money and resources to comply with this

will be interesting to see where the midmajors land

ncaa already cancelled all fall championships in D2 and D3

curious why they would cancel fall championships for D2 & D3, but leave D1 unchanged? Is it just about the money then?
 

John_J_Rambo

Senior
Jan 10, 2020
2,435
4,189
113
title ix is federal law - not an NCAA regulation

would need to get the law changed - I don’t think leaving the NCAA would change this?
The only people who like money more than the ncaa are lawmakers.

This will only be a roadblock for small thinkers mired in the past. But not at all for actual progress.
 

NikkiSixx

Graduate Assistant
Sep 14, 2013
5,463
3,584
113
Licensing, tv contracts, etc.

Anytime a member school hits the airwaves, their beak gets wet
I had to look it up to see and found the following:

The NCAA makes about $1 billion per year. College athletics as a whole pulls in about $12 billion annually. NCAA money comes mostly from TV and marketing and makes up less than 10% of all college athletics money. The rest comes from school ticket sales and student fees, which account for an astounding $11 billion every year.

96% of all NCAA money gets distributed to member schools or spent on championships. The schools use that money to fund athletics programs and pay staff and coaches. A big chunk of the money is used to build and maintain stadiums and sports facilities and buy sports equipment.

source: https://moneynation.com/how-much-money-does-the-ncaa-make/
 

Crazyhole

Junior
Jun 4, 2004
1,618
2,229
113
the ncaa is a cartel, and is completely ill equipped to run major college sports

they are not long for this world. it ain’t 1930 anymore.
Cartel is not the right term for the NCAA. Sorry, its kind of a bugaboo of mine when I see that term be used in the wrong instance. I dont know what the right term is for the NCAA, but it would be synonymous with inept, corrupt, and unnecessary.
 

John_J_Rambo

Senior
Jan 10, 2020
2,435
4,189
113
I had to look it up to see and found the following:

The NCAA makes about $1 billion per year. College athletics as a whole pulls in about $12 billion annually. NCAA money comes mostly from TV and marketing and makes up less than 10% of all college athletics money. The rest comes from school ticket sales and student fees, which account for an astounding $11 billion every year.

96% of all NCAA money gets distributed to member schools or spent on championships. The schools use that money to fund athletics programs and pay staff and coaches. A big chunk of the money is used to build and maintain stadiums and sports facilities and buy sports equipment.

source: https://moneynation.com/how-much-money-does-the-ncaa-make/
Yep, the org and its members don’t hoard the money, they spend it. Which is why you see the facilities arms race, coaching salaries and a complete lack of safety net in the event of season-cancelling pandemics.

In my opinion, the dollars are discarded as a bad faith veil to continue to pretend funds aren’t available to compensate athletes.
 

John_J_Rambo

Senior
Jan 10, 2020
2,435
4,189
113
Cartel is not the right term for the NCAA. Sorry, its kind of a bugaboo of mine when I see that term be used in the wrong instance. I dont know what the right term is for the NCAA, but it would be synonymous with inept, corrupt, and unnecessary.
Fair enough.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dinglefritz

NikkiSixx

Graduate Assistant
Sep 14, 2013
5,463
3,584
113
Yep, the org and its members don’t hoard the money, they spend it. Which is why you see the facilities arms race, coaching salaries and a complete lack of safety net in the event of season-cancelling pandemics.

In my opinion, the dollars are discarded as a bad faith veil to continue to pretend funds aren’t available to compensate athletes.
a 1 billion dollar skim off the top is a hell of a lot of money to pay a middle man every year
 

jlb321

Recruiting Coordinator
Aug 8, 2014
6,839
7,763
113
The only people who like money more than the ncaa are lawmakers.

This will only be a roadblock for small thinkers mired in the past. But not at all for actual progress.
not arguing right or wrong but interested in how they would get around title IX -

One way I suppose would be to just sponsor less sports - the NCAA mandates X number of athletic programs to qualify as div 1

in which case you would likely have just football, men’s and women’s basketball and enough women’s programs to offset football
 
Last edited:

John_J_Rambo

Senior
Jan 10, 2020
2,435
4,189
113
not arguing right or wrong but interested in how they would get around title IX -

One way I suppose would be to just sponsor less sports - the NCAA mandates X number of athletic programs to qualify as div 1

in which case you would likely have just football, men’s and women’s basketball and enough women’s programs to offset football
the obvious way is to decouple it entirely from education, which is what title ix applies to.
 

Crazyhole

Junior
Jun 4, 2004
1,618
2,229
113
a 1 billion dollar skim off the top is a hell of a lot of money to pay a middle man every year
Especially when the members themselves have to perform their own compliance and when issues come up that need leadership they defer. Not to mention the fact that they have no authority to punish non-compliance. The NCAA is basically a larger version of your local chamber of commerce.
 
Oct 12, 2016
1,796
1,271
113
With attention focused elsewhere, it is not surprising that a couple of recent developments have gone relatively unnoticed. But you might be interested.
1. Yesterday the NCAA Board of Governors took an extraordinary step. It not only reiterated its COVID guidelines to be met for participation this fall, it made them mandatory. This form an organization that has previously made it clear that schools and conferences decide when and under what circumstances they can play, setting forth rules regarding length of season and practice, etc. but purposely staying out of policy. So going forward, if Division I institutions decide they will go forward with a season, they will have to be in compliance with testing requirements, quarantine rules, etc. that were previously merely guidelines. If at any point during a season an institution is not meeting those guidelines, it will have to shut down its program. This is a big deal.
2. Within the last 48 hours a panel of the NInth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the O'Bannon trial judge's ruling that NCAA schools can provide unlimited benefits to student-athletes as long as the benefits are "tethered to education." This could be huge and go well beyond protractors and pencils. Consider during recruitment, School A promises to pay for a recruit to go to law school after his playing days are done. Is that a benefit "tethered to education?" Many will say yes. Theoretically, School A could promise to pay the recruit's law school tuition at School B. It still is tied to education. The NCAA has already asked the US Supreme Court for review, but the chances of that body accepting the case are slim. Things could very interesting. Stay tuned.
Can we pay walkons?
 

TruHusker

Offensive Coordinator
Sep 21, 2001
8,598
2,949
113
I am not a fan of the NCAA and I admit I REALLY don't know their inner workings. I knew a guy whose son was an investigator for them. He worked the USC case under Pete Carroll.

Title IX is not going away, if anything it will be strengthened. It is a hallmark at the HS level as well unless, as stated above, sports has nothing to do with education, which in some cases may actually be true but not a reality overall.

If the NCAA is replaced, who is the governing body? Schools won't/can't govern themselves. You have to have some kind of standards and by-laws and people to make it fly. Would this be like the old NBA/ABA or NFL/AFL? Two separate leagues so to speak? Eventually these groups would have to come together so don't you end up with an NCAA with perhaps a different name. I am having a hard time seeing anything come out of this that will actually solve any problems.
 

tpmcg

Offensive Coordinator
Mar 25, 2002
9,234
1,712
113
couldnt get thru a thread yesterday about covid without it getting hijacked about a gal at least 2.5 bills over the limit and this one was set-up nicely for a hijack and crickets...sorry, long day.
 

dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
23,640
16,946
113
This mandate from the NCAA is a death blow to teams like the teams in the Dakotas. There's no way UND, SDSU and USD will be able to afford the testing they're talking about. This is just plain insanity. While college kids are already flocking to house parties and swapping spit with random hookups we're going to kill fall athletics because of a virus which doesn't make 99% of college aged kids even get a runny nose. Insanity.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: bshirt73