Survival of the vaccinated

HuskerGuy33

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.
 

steinek11

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.
Rip nebby

66dbba0829f44837d0a7788ec6b3a1d6.jpg
 

Jaemekon

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Makes those searching for suicide easier. What better way than the easy way? If someone is fed up with this go on Earth, well they now have the ability to kill themselves without actually doing it.

This gives the spirit a loophole to avoid the punishment of suicide. It's just listed as a risk, like skydiving.

So for all you out there looking to get off this ride a little bit early. You now have an opportunity.
 

cavalot

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.
Didn't Trump himself get vaccinated?
 

Bobfather

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.
And in 5 years I will be seeing people like you signing up for the class action lawsuits being advertised on TV.
 

zar45

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.

I sympathize for them. They're largely victims of their own worldview bubbles which have gaslighted them into an alternate reality.
 

realbp

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Why is it those who do not get the vaccine are automatically considered dead eventually?
Why some can not accept this virus has a 99% survival rate is weird.
It also has a 100% f^ck up society rate; so there's that. You would have thought those wanting society to open up in April of 2020 would be first in line for something to assure society would stay open. I don't know, just spit balling here.
 

Cash68847

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.
I really hope you do your part since you’re vaccinated and keep masking up and social distancing since the delta variant is on the loose.
 
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williamsonframe

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It also has a 100% f^ck up society rate; so there's that. You would have thought those wanting society to open up in April of 2020 would be first in line for something to assure society would stay open. I don't know, just spit balling here.
If you're vaxxed then don't worry about those people.
 
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JOHNNY N

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.
You do know that the vast majority of people recover from covid?

Oh and less than 30% of black people are vaccinated, not exactly Trump's base.
 

corvettez06

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It also has a 100% f^ck up society rate; so there's that. You would have thought those wanting society to open up in April of 2020 would be first in line for something to assure society would stay open. I don't know,
You do know that the vast majority of people recover from covid?

Oh and less than 30% of black people are vaccinated, not exactly Trump's base.
You do know that the vast majority of people recover from covid?

Oh and less than 30% of black people are vaccinated, not exactly Trump's base.
I wonder if Sone posters consider them Trumpturds? Because everyone who dose not get a vaccine is a Trumpturd according to certain posters.
 

HuskerGuy33

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I really hope you do your part since you’re vaccinated and keep masking up and social distancing since the delta variant is on the loose.
I live in a high rise condo so I always mask up and socially distance in my building even though I'm fully vaccinated. I do my part and have no problem masking up indoors in public spaces until we're completely past this pandemic....
 

Cash68847

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I live in a high rise condo so I always mask up and socially distance in my building even though I'm fully vaccinated. I do my part and have no problem masking up indoors in public spaces until we're completely past this pandemic....
Atleast you’re not a hypocrite. I can respect that even though our views differ.
 
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Redblooded

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98% of people with Delta covid are the non-vaccinated people. Which means they are the ones that have died. The low percentage vaccinated states have the most COVID, like Missouri, etc. I am praying the the anti-vax people will smarten up and get the vaccine.
 

ehenningsen

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98% of people with Delta covid are the non-vaccinated people. Which means they are the ones that have died. The low percentage vaccinated states have the most COVID, like Missouri, etc. I am praying the the anti-vax people will smarten up and get the vaccine.
I hope so too. I wish the vaccine would become apolitical
 
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HUSKERinLA

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It's interesting to see what is happening with the Delta Variant and those that refuse to get vaccinated. At this point, people that are making the decision to not be vaccinated and get infected I have little to no sympathy for them. It will be survival of the vaccinated vs unvaccinated. This shouldn't be a political issue but it is no surprise that the majority of those not getting vaccinated are Trumpers. I guess there will be less Trumpers around for the next election.
The best Trumper has always been a dead Trumper.

Love it that Orange Satan has started doing rallies again to kill off more of his cult members faster.
 

Redblooded

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Ron Johnson is not helping things by shooting off his mouth off about the vaccine. The guy is an idiot like some on FOX News reporters who are promoting fears about the vaccine. It can be like suicide to not get the vaccine.
 

burntorange72

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It also has a 100% f^ck up society rate; so there's that. You would have thought those wanting society to open up in April of 2020 would be first in line for something to assure society would stay open. I don't know, just spit balling here.
It only screws up your world if you let it. You should look at Texas or Florida. Even California has opened up. Don’t live in fear. Or you will find a reason to wear a mask the rest of your life.
 
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burntorange72

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I live in a high rise condo so I always mask up and socially distance in my building even though I'm fully vaccinated. I do my part and have no problem masking up indoors in public spaces until we're completely past this pandemic....
There will always be a reason to mask up. The seasonal flu is a good reason to wear a mask. In SE Asia it is part of the culture. Many people wear a mask when they are going to be in crowed public places. It just hasn’t been part of the culture in the US. Here it is associate with living in fear.
 
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Gonzo3705

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There will always be a reason to mask up. The seasonal flu is a good reason to wear a mask. In SE Asia it is part of the culture. Many people wear a mask when they are going to be in crowed public places. It just hasn’t been part of the culture in the US. Here it is associate with living in fear.
It is "associate with living in fear" by really stupid people.
 

HuskerGuy33

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It only screws up your world if you let it. You should look at Texas or Florida. Even California has opened up. Don’t live in fear. Or you will find a reason to wear a mask the rest of your live.
You should check out what they're now saying about the Delta Variant:



The more dangerous and more transmissible Delta variant has spread to nearly every state in the U.S., feeding health experts' concern over potential COVID-19 spikes in the fall.

The variant was first identified in India and is now considered a variant of concern by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meaning scientists believe it can spread more easily or cause more severe disease.

The Delta variant now accounts for about one in every five new coronavirus infections in the U.S., the CDC has said. And with more than half of the population still not fully vaccinated, according to the CDC, health experts and officials worry that regions with low amounts of virus protection could see surges in the fall and winter.


Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CBS that in terms of Delta spread, the U.S. is about a month or two behind the UK -- a country that has been dealing with high numbers of cases despite relatively high vaccination rates. For those such countries, the World Health Organization advised last week that even the fully vaccinated should continue to wear masks.

Already in Los Angeles County, the pace of this variant's spread has motivated officials to reinstate mask guidance for public indoor spaces, regardless of vaccination status.

Calling it a "precautionary measure," the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued the voluntary mask guidance Monday, saying it was necessary until health officials can "better understand how and to who the Delta variant is spreading."

Experts have said that evidence points to vaccines like those from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech providing high amounts of protection against the variant, but LA Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said it is not clear what the future of the variant will be as it becomes more prevalent.

But not all local leaders are reinstating preventative guidance at this time.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced Monday that masks will not be mandatory in the state's school buildings.

With more than two months until schools open, Murphy noted these rules could change depending on how the virus spreads and what the CDC decides.

"This is our best sense of what back to school looks like. It's far more than an educated guess," Murphy said.

ACT NOW TO FULLY IMMUNIZE YOUR CHILD BEFORE THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR​

For parents worrying over the possibility of regional variant surges in the fall, the time to vaccinate children for school is now.

Many large school systems -- including Atlanta; Fort Myers, Florida; Flagstaff, Arizona; and the entire state of Hawaii -- start school in the first two weeks of August.

It takes five weeks to be fully vaccinated with Pfizer's vaccine, the only one authorized for adolescents ages 12 to 17. That means, for example, Atlanta students need to get their first shot by July 1 to be fully immunized by the first day of school on August 5.

Pfizer's vaccine is given in two doses spaced three weeks apart. After the second dose, it takes two weeks for someone to be considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

As of June 24, nearly 1 in 5 children ages 12 to 15 were fully vaccinated and nearly 1 in 3 teens ages 16 and 17 were fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

SOME VACCINES OFFER YEARS OF PROTECTION, STUDY SHOWS​

Another question experts have been searching to answer as variants spread: How long does the protection from vaccines last?

A new study suggests that, unlike vaccines for the flu that need a yearly booster, the two-dose Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine should keep an immune response up for years.

The human body produces immune system components called antibodies to attack and neutralize an invader such as a virus. But these die off over time. To make sure of a long-term response, the body needs to keep the capacity to make more antibodies that can specifically respond to certain viruses or bacteria as needed. It does this with B-cells.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found people who got both doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine had little factories called germinal centres that make B-cells that should specifically recognize the coronavirus, meaning there's a possibility for long-lasting protection, according to a study published in the journal Nature.

The CDC's vaccine advisory committee has had discussions on potential booster shots as experts have been preparing for the possibility that immunity would wane quickly or that variants would elude the protection of current vaccines.

With officials still struggling to motivate the hesitant population to get vaccinated so the U.S. can cross the threshold needed to control community spread, concerns have grown that mobilizing boosters would add yet another challenge.

And for those wanting the protection but fearing potential negative side effects, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility and the benefits of pregnant women getting vaccinated outweigh the risks.

Fauci noted that "tens and tens and tens of thousands of people" have received the vaccine while pregnant and before getting pregnant.

It's clear that COVID-19 can be especially dangerous during pregnancy, he said at an online event hosted by the Health and Human Services Department.

"The mother can have an adverse pregnancy event, as can the fetus," he said. "The best thing one can do to protect yourself is to actually get vaccinated."
 

HuskerGuy33

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Jan 29, 2005
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There will always be a reason to mask up. The seasonal flu is a good reason to wear a mask. In SE Asia it is part of the culture. Many people wear a mask when they are going to be in crowed public places. It just hasn’t been part of the culture in the US. Here it is associate with living in fear.

I agree 100%. To me, why is it a big deal if you put on a mask when you go inside a store (especially right now). Until a higher percentage of the population gets vaccinated I think everyone should still be wearing masks in indoor public spaces.

This way store owners don't need to worry about who has been vaccinated and who has not. If everyone does their part, we shouldn't see another wave of this....
 

Jaemekon

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Apr 23, 2007
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You should check out what they're now saying about the Delta Variant:



The more dangerous and more transmissible Delta variant has spread to nearly every state in the U.S., feeding health experts' concern over potential COVID-19 spikes in the fall.

The variant was first identified in India and is now considered a variant of concern by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meaning scientists believe it can spread more easily or cause more severe disease.

The Delta variant now accounts for about one in every five new coronavirus infections in the U.S., the CDC has said. And with more than half of the population still not fully vaccinated, according to the CDC, health experts and officials worry that regions with low amounts of virus protection could see surges in the fall and winter.


Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CBS that in terms of Delta spread, the U.S. is about a month or two behind the UK -- a country that has been dealing with high numbers of cases despite relatively high vaccination rates. For those such countries, the World Health Organization advised last week that even the fully vaccinated should continue to wear masks.

Already in Los Angeles County, the pace of this variant's spread has motivated officials to reinstate mask guidance for public indoor spaces, regardless of vaccination status.

Calling it a "precautionary measure," the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued the voluntary mask guidance Monday, saying it was necessary until health officials can "better understand how and to who the Delta variant is spreading."

Experts have said that evidence points to vaccines like those from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech providing high amounts of protection against the variant, but LA Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said it is not clear what the future of the variant will be as it becomes more prevalent.

But not all local leaders are reinstating preventative guidance at this time.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced Monday that masks will not be mandatory in the state's school buildings.

With more than two months until schools open, Murphy noted these rules could change depending on how the virus spreads and what the CDC decides.

"This is our best sense of what back to school looks like. It's far more than an educated guess," Murphy said.

ACT NOW TO FULLY IMMUNIZE YOUR CHILD BEFORE THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR​

For parents worrying over the possibility of regional variant surges in the fall, the time to vaccinate children for school is now.

Many large school systems -- including Atlanta; Fort Myers, Florida; Flagstaff, Arizona; and the entire state of Hawaii -- start school in the first two weeks of August.

It takes five weeks to be fully vaccinated with Pfizer's vaccine, the only one authorized for adolescents ages 12 to 17. That means, for example, Atlanta students need to get their first shot by July 1 to be fully immunized by the first day of school on August 5.

Pfizer's vaccine is given in two doses spaced three weeks apart. After the second dose, it takes two weeks for someone to be considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

As of June 24, nearly 1 in 5 children ages 12 to 15 were fully vaccinated and nearly 1 in 3 teens ages 16 and 17 were fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

SOME VACCINES OFFER YEARS OF PROTECTION, STUDY SHOWS​

Another question experts have been searching to answer as variants spread: How long does the protection from vaccines last?

A new study suggests that, unlike vaccines for the flu that need a yearly booster, the two-dose Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine should keep an immune response up for years.

The human body produces immune system components called antibodies to attack and neutralize an invader such as a virus. But these die off over time. To make sure of a long-term response, the body needs to keep the capacity to make more antibodies that can specifically respond to certain viruses or bacteria as needed. It does this with B-cells.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found people who got both doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine had little factories called germinal centres that make B-cells that should specifically recognize the coronavirus, meaning there's a possibility for long-lasting protection, according to a study published in the journal Nature.

The CDC's vaccine advisory committee has had discussions on potential booster shots as experts have been preparing for the possibility that immunity would wane quickly or that variants would elude the protection of current vaccines.

With officials still struggling to motivate the hesitant population to get vaccinated so the U.S. can cross the threshold needed to control community spread, concerns have grown that mobilizing boosters would add yet another challenge.

And for those wanting the protection but fearing potential negative side effects, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility and the benefits of pregnant women getting vaccinated outweigh the risks.

Fauci noted that "tens and tens and tens of thousands of people" have received the vaccine while pregnant and before getting pregnant.

It's clear that COVID-19 can be especially dangerous during pregnancy, he said at an online event hosted by the Health and Human Services Department.

"The mother can have an adverse pregnancy event, as can the fetus," he said. "The best thing one can do to protect yourself is to actually get vaccinated."

So, football will probably get fvcked up again?

 

HuskerGuy33

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Today, I learned one of my cousins that lives in a state with a low vaccination rate where only 38% of the state is fully vaccinated is in the hospital, and guess what they're in the hospital with? Yep, COVID. Am I surprised? Nope, not at all. They refused to get vaccinated, but now their immediate family is asking for prayers on facebook.

My prayer is that people that refuse to get vaccinated will wake up to the pandemic and get vaccinated so they don't end up in the hospital. It's never too late.
 

burntorange72

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Mar 9, 2004
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You should check out what they're now saying about the Delta Variant:



The more dangerous and more transmissible Delta variant has spread to nearly every state in the U.S., feeding health experts' concern over potential COVID-19 spikes in the fall.

The variant was first identified in India and is now considered a variant of concern by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meaning scientists believe it can spread more easily or cause more severe disease.

The Delta variant now accounts for about one in every five new coronavirus infections in the U.S., the CDC has said. And with more than half of the population still not fully vaccinated, according to the CDC, health experts and officials worry that regions with low amounts of virus protection could see surges in the fall and winter.


Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb told CBS that in terms of Delta spread, the U.S. is about a month or two behind the UK -- a country that has been dealing with high numbers of cases despite relatively high vaccination rates. For those such countries, the World Health Organization advised last week that even the fully vaccinated should continue to wear masks.

Already in Los Angeles County, the pace of this variant's spread has motivated officials to reinstate mask guidance for public indoor spaces, regardless of vaccination status.

Calling it a "precautionary measure," the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health issued the voluntary mask guidance Monday, saying it was necessary until health officials can "better understand how and to who the Delta variant is spreading."

Experts have said that evidence points to vaccines like those from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech providing high amounts of protection against the variant, but LA Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said it is not clear what the future of the variant will be as it becomes more prevalent.

But not all local leaders are reinstating preventative guidance at this time.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy announced Monday that masks will not be mandatory in the state's school buildings.

With more than two months until schools open, Murphy noted these rules could change depending on how the virus spreads and what the CDC decides.

"This is our best sense of what back to school looks like. It's far more than an educated guess," Murphy said.

ACT NOW TO FULLY IMMUNIZE YOUR CHILD BEFORE THE NEW SCHOOL YEAR​

For parents worrying over the possibility of regional variant surges in the fall, the time to vaccinate children for school is now.

Many large school systems -- including Atlanta; Fort Myers, Florida; Flagstaff, Arizona; and the entire state of Hawaii -- start school in the first two weeks of August.

It takes five weeks to be fully vaccinated with Pfizer's vaccine, the only one authorized for adolescents ages 12 to 17. That means, for example, Atlanta students need to get their first shot by July 1 to be fully immunized by the first day of school on August 5.

Pfizer's vaccine is given in two doses spaced three weeks apart. After the second dose, it takes two weeks for someone to be considered fully vaccinated, according to the CDC.

As of June 24, nearly 1 in 5 children ages 12 to 15 were fully vaccinated and nearly 1 in 3 teens ages 16 and 17 were fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

SOME VACCINES OFFER YEARS OF PROTECTION, STUDY SHOWS​

Another question experts have been searching to answer as variants spread: How long does the protection from vaccines last?

A new study suggests that, unlike vaccines for the flu that need a yearly booster, the two-dose Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine should keep an immune response up for years.

The human body produces immune system components called antibodies to attack and neutralize an invader such as a virus. But these die off over time. To make sure of a long-term response, the body needs to keep the capacity to make more antibodies that can specifically respond to certain viruses or bacteria as needed. It does this with B-cells.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found people who got both doses of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine had little factories called germinal centres that make B-cells that should specifically recognize the coronavirus, meaning there's a possibility for long-lasting protection, according to a study published in the journal Nature.

The CDC's vaccine advisory committee has had discussions on potential booster shots as experts have been preparing for the possibility that immunity would wane quickly or that variants would elude the protection of current vaccines.

With officials still struggling to motivate the hesitant population to get vaccinated so the U.S. can cross the threshold needed to control community spread, concerns have grown that mobilizing boosters would add yet another challenge.

And for those wanting the protection but fearing potential negative side effects, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday there is no evidence that COVID-19 vaccines affect fertility and the benefits of pregnant women getting vaccinated outweigh the risks.

Fauci noted that "tens and tens and tens of thousands of people" have received the vaccine while pregnant and before getting pregnant.

It's clear that COVID-19 can be especially dangerous during pregnancy, he said at an online event hosted by the Health and Human Services Department.

"The mother can have an adverse pregnancy event, as can the fetus," he said. "The best thing one can do to protect yourself is to actually get vaccinated."
So what’s your point? If you have been vaccinated you should be just fine. I think the article says that even with the Delt variant. Why are you wearing a mask if you have been vaccinated? Are you virtue signaling? Does this make you feel more superior than others? Are you afraid you’ll catch Covid? Don’t live in fear.

I have been vaccinated and I look at people who wear a mask and ask myself why? Why don’t you get vaccinated? Or why do you want to wear a mask if you have been vaccinated? Maybe your too stupid to take the mask off. Maybe you want to feel better than me. Or maybe you just want to call attention to yourself, “look at me, look at me, I’m more special, altruistic, thoughtful, than all you other deplorables” Your wearing a mask sends a message that obviously you don’t understand.
 

huskerfan_12_05

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98% of people with Delta covid are the non-vaccinated people. Which means they are the ones that have died. The low percentage vaccinated states have the most COVID, like Missouri, etc. I am praying the the anti-vax people will smarten up and get the vaccine.
This isn’t true, 50% of the people in UK as of last week that had the Delta variant were vaccinated folks
 

lost_in_office_space

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Honestly, if all people are going to do is fight over different viewpoints constantly. Living in fear of eachother. Letting it dominate all discourse. I’m fine with with death.