Republicans can win the next elections through gerrymandering alone

Lar Gand

Blackshirt
Gold Member
May 6, 2012
3,025
3,067
113
The Republican Party is far beyond winning any election by honest means, such as having a true platform and issues that they stand for, other than trying to smear the other guy.
But, this is there way to ensure that they win undeserved elections. By killing Democracy.



"In Washington, the real insiders know that the true outrages are what’s perfectly legal and that it’s simply a gaffe when someone accidentally blurts out something honest.

And so it barely made a ripple last week when a Texas congressman (and Donald Trump’s former White House physician) said aloud what’s supposed to be kept to a backroom whisper: Republicans intend to retake the US House of Representatives in 2022 through gerrymandering.

“We have redistricting coming up and the Republicans control most of that process in most of the states around the country,” Representative Ronny Jackson told a conference of religious conservatives. “That alone should get us the majority back.”


He’s right. Republicans won’t have to win more votes next year to claim the US House.

In fact, everyone could vote the exact same way for Congress next year as they did in 2020 – when Democratic candidates nationwide won more than 4.7 million votes than Republicans and narrowly held the chamber – but under the new maps that will be in place, the Republican party would take control.

How is this possible? The Republican party only needs to win five seats to wrench the Speaker’s gavel from Nancy Pelosi. They could draw themselves a dozen – or more – through gerrymandering alone. Republicans could create at least two additional red seats in Texas and North Carolina, and another certain two in Georgia and Florida. Then could nab another in Kansas, Kentucky, Tennessee and New Hampshire.

They won’t need to embrace policies favored by a majority of Americans. All they need to do is rework maps to their favor in states where they hold complete control of the decennial redistricting that follows the census – some of which they have held since they gerrymandered them 10 years ago. Now they can double down on the undeserved majorities that they have seized and dominate another decade.

If Republicans aggressively maximize every advantage and crash through any of the usual guardrails – and they have given every indication that they will – there’s little Democrats can do. And after a 2019 US supreme court decision declared partisan gerrymandering a non-justiciable political issue, the federal courts will be powerless as well.

It’s one of the many time bombs that threatens representative democracy and American traditions of majority rule. It’s a sign of how much power they have – and how aggressively they intend to wield it – that Republicans aren’t even bothering to deny that they intend to implode it.

“We control redistricting,” boasted Stephen Stepanek, New Hampshire’s Republican state party chair. “I can stand here today and guarantee you that we will send a conservative Republican to Washington as a congressperson in 2022.”

In Kansas, Susan Wagle, the Republican party state senate president, campaigned on a promise to draw a gerrymandered map that “takes out” the only Democrat in the state’s congressional delegation. “We can do that,” Wagle boasted. “I guarantee you that we can draw four Republican congressional maps.”

Texas Republicans will look to reinforce a map that has held back demographic trends favoring Democrats over the last decade by, among other things, dividing liberal Austin into five pieces and attaching them to rural conservative counties in order to dilute Democratic votes. Texas will also have two additional seats next decade due largely to Latino population growth; in 2011, when similar growth created four new seats for Texas, Republicans managed to draw three for themselves.

North Carolina Republicans crafted a reliable 10-3 Republican delegation throughout the last decade. When the state supreme court declared the congressional map unconstitutional in 2019, it forced the creation of a fairer map in time for 2020. Democrats immediately gained two seats. But the state GOP will control the entire process once again this cycle, so those two seats will likely change side – and Republicans could find a way to draw themselves the seat the state gained after reapportionment.

Two Atlanta-area Democrats are in danger of being gerrymandered out of office by Republicans. The single Democratic member from Kentucky, and one of just two from Tennessee, are in jeopardy if Republicans choose to crack Louisville and Nashville, respectively, and scatter the urban areas across multiple districts. Florida Republicans ignored state constitution provisions against partisan gerrymandering in 2011 and created what a state court called a conspiracy to mount a secret, shadow redistricting process. It took the court until the 2016 election to unwind those ill-gotten GOP gains, however, which provides little incentive not to do the same thing once more. This time, a more conservative state supreme court might even allow those gains to stand.

Might Democrats try the same thing? Democrats might look to squeeze a couple seats from New York and one additional seat from Illinois and possibly Maryland. But that’s scarcely enough to counter the overall GOP edge. In Colorado, Oregon and Virginia, states controlled entirely by Democrats, the party has either created an independent redistricting commission or made a deal to give Republicans a seat at the table. Commissions also draw the lines in other Democratic strongholds like California, Washington and New Jersey. There are no seats to gain in overwhelmingly blue states like Massachusetts, New Mexico and Connecticut.

In many ways, the Republican edge is left over from 2010, when the party remade American politics with a plan called Redmap – short for the Redistricting Majority Project – that aimed to capture swing-state legislatures in places like North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan and Florida, among others. They’ve never handed them back. Now Redmap enters its second decade of dominance – just as the lawmakers it put into office continue rewriting swing-state election laws to benefit Republicans, under the unfounded pretext of “voter fraud” that did not occur during 2020.

Republicans already benefit from a structural advantage in the electoral college and the US Senate. Presidents that lost the popular vote have appointed five conservative justices to the US supreme court. Now get ready for a drunken bacchanalia of partisan gerrymandering that could make “hot vax summer” look like a chaste Victorian celebration.

Meanwhile, this is how a democracy withers and disappears – slowly, legally, and in plain sight."
 

Jaemekon

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Apr 23, 2007
5,290
5,071
113
What do people expect of politicians? How is this "news" anyway, because someone at yahoo thinks it might, or could happen?

Someone could show up at a Walmart in iowa with a bomb. Let's get an article about that.

It just seems like a pointless article, that's all. I'm just tired of worthless media lately.

EnormousThriftyArcticwolf-max-1mb.gif
 
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Lar Gand

Blackshirt
Gold Member
May 6, 2012
3,025
3,067
113
What do people expect of politicians? How is this "news" anyway, because someone at yahoo thinks it might, or could happen?

Someone could show up at a Walmart in iowa with a bomb. Let's get an article about that.

It just seems like a pointless article, that's all. I'm just tired of worthless media is lately.

EnormousThriftyArcticwolf-max-1mb.gif

What is left of the decimated Republican Party is counting on people just like you.
 

Hardlyboy

Offensive Coordinator
Gold Member
Jan 26, 2011
8,424
13,070
113
What do people expect of politicians? How is this "news" anyway, because someone at yahoo thinks it might, or could happen?

Someone could show up at a Walmart in iowa with a bomb. Let's get an article about that.

It just seems like a pointless article, that's all. I'm just tired of worthless media is lately.

EnormousThriftyArcticwolf-max-1mb.gif
Because gerrymandering happens, a lot. Just take a look at Dan Crenshaw’s district in Texas.


JMZCIO7GTZDDDJD2YO6NOE32WY.PNG
 

Jaemekon

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Apr 23, 2007
5,290
5,071
113
What is left of the decimated Republican Party is counting on people just like you.

If only I was a rupublican. Then I could benefit. I'm sorry to inform you that I am one of "your" type. Unless you be a rupublican? Or unless you vote and support a political party, then I am not like you.

The article was pointless. I thought maybe you were new to politics the way you posted the article making it seem like "news". Ultimately it's more of the same shit...

shit-everywhere.gif
 
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Hail Varsity

Offensive Coordinator
Gold Member
Jul 17, 2001
8,352
4,664
113
The Republican Party is far beyond winning any election by honest means, such as having a true platform and issues that they stand for, other than trying to smear the other guy.
But, this is there way to ensure that they win undeserved elections. By killing Democracy.



"In Washington, the real insiders know that the true outrages are what’s perfectly legal and that it’s simply a gaffe when someone accidentally blurts out something honest.

And so it barely made a ripple last week when a Texas congressman (and Donald Trump’s former White House physician) said aloud what’s supposed to be kept to a backroom whisper: Republicans intend to retake the US House of Representatives in 2022 through gerrymandering.

“We have redistricting coming up and the Republicans control most of that process in most of the states around the country,” Representative Ronny Jackson told a conference of religious conservatives. “That alone should get us the majority back.”


He’s right. Republicans won’t have to win more votes next year to claim the US House.

In fact, everyone could vote the exact same way for Congress next year as they did in 2020 – when Democratic candidates nationwide won more than 4.7 million votes than Republicans and narrowly held the chamber – but under the new maps that will be in place, the Republican party would take control.

How is this possible? The Republican party only needs to win five seats to wrench the Speaker’s gavel from Nancy Pelosi. They could draw themselves a dozen – or more – through gerrymandering alone. Republicans could create at least two additional red seats in Texas and North Carolina, and another certain two in Georgia and Florida. Then could nab another in Kansas, Kentucky, Tennessee and New Hampshire.

They won’t need to embrace policies favored by a majority of Americans. All they need to do is rework maps to their favor in states where they hold complete control of the decennial redistricting that follows the census – some of which they have held since they gerrymandered them 10 years ago. Now they can double down on the undeserved majorities that they have seized and dominate another decade.

If Republicans aggressively maximize every advantage and crash through any of the usual guardrails – and they have given every indication that they will – there’s little Democrats can do. And after a 2019 US supreme court decision declared partisan gerrymandering a non-justiciable political issue, the federal courts will be powerless as well.

It’s one of the many time bombs that threatens representative democracy and American traditions of majority rule. It’s a sign of how much power they have – and how aggressively they intend to wield it – that Republicans aren’t even bothering to deny that they intend to implode it.

“We control redistricting,” boasted Stephen Stepanek, New Hampshire’s Republican state party chair. “I can stand here today and guarantee you that we will send a conservative Republican to Washington as a congressperson in 2022.”

In Kansas, Susan Wagle, the Republican party state senate president, campaigned on a promise to draw a gerrymandered map that “takes out” the only Democrat in the state’s congressional delegation. “We can do that,” Wagle boasted. “I guarantee you that we can draw four Republican congressional maps.”

Texas Republicans will look to reinforce a map that has held back demographic trends favoring Democrats over the last decade by, among other things, dividing liberal Austin into five pieces and attaching them to rural conservative counties in order to dilute Democratic votes. Texas will also have two additional seats next decade due largely to Latino population growth; in 2011, when similar growth created four new seats for Texas, Republicans managed to draw three for themselves.

North Carolina Republicans crafted a reliable 10-3 Republican delegation throughout the last decade. When the state supreme court declared the congressional map unconstitutional in 2019, it forced the creation of a fairer map in time for 2020. Democrats immediately gained two seats. But the state GOP will control the entire process once again this cycle, so those two seats will likely change side – and Republicans could find a way to draw themselves the seat the state gained after reapportionment.

Two Atlanta-area Democrats are in danger of being gerrymandered out of office by Republicans. The single Democratic member from Kentucky, and one of just two from Tennessee, are in jeopardy if Republicans choose to crack Louisville and Nashville, respectively, and scatter the urban areas across multiple districts. Florida Republicans ignored state constitution provisions against partisan gerrymandering in 2011 and created what a state court called a conspiracy to mount a secret, shadow redistricting process. It took the court until the 2016 election to unwind those ill-gotten GOP gains, however, which provides little incentive not to do the same thing once more. This time, a more conservative state supreme court might even allow those gains to stand.

Might Democrats try the same thing? Democrats might look to squeeze a couple seats from New York and one additional seat from Illinois and possibly Maryland. But that’s scarcely enough to counter the overall GOP edge. In Colorado, Oregon and Virginia, states controlled entirely by Democrats, the party has either created an independent redistricting commission or made a deal to give Republicans a seat at the table. Commissions also draw the lines in other Democratic strongholds like California, Washington and New Jersey. There are no seats to gain in overwhelmingly blue states like Massachusetts, New Mexico and Connecticut.

In many ways, the Republican edge is left over from 2010, when the party remade American politics with a plan called Redmap – short for the Redistricting Majority Project – that aimed to capture swing-state legislatures in places like North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan and Florida, among others. They’ve never handed them back. Now Redmap enters its second decade of dominance – just as the lawmakers it put into office continue rewriting swing-state election laws to benefit Republicans, under the unfounded pretext of “voter fraud” that did not occur during 2020.

Republicans already benefit from a structural advantage in the electoral college and the US Senate. Presidents that lost the popular vote have appointed five conservative justices to the US supreme court. Now get ready for a drunken bacchanalia of partisan gerrymandering that could make “hot vax summer” look like a chaste Victorian celebration.

Meanwhile, this is how a democracy withers and disappears – slowly, legally, and in plain sight."
We've heard talk for the past two years about election "integrity" and "access." This typically refers to what happens in the weeks and days leading up to an election day and that tabulation and certification process. But this story outlines something far more dangerous, which is attacking our democratic process by engineering districts to generate a desired and predetermined result.

I don't know enough about the relationship of federal and state election laws to have a point of view on what can be done, but certainly anyone who believes in fair and honest elections has to believe that creating a district that looks like a slithering snake around a city isn't in the spirit of that credo. It's the equivalent of stuffing the ballot box based on party affiliation and preferences.

Why can't a joint federal and state commission agree on a state by state approach built around rational and practical guidelines and boundaries? For example, form election districts by township, county or some geographic algorithm that takes demographic and party registration out of the equation.

I'm sure this can't happen because one party or the other would suffer too much in the process even if it's the most logical, practical and fair way to do districts.
 

zar45

All-American
Gold Member
Jun 13, 2016
4,709
11,792
113
The Republican Party is far beyond winning any election by honest means, such as having a true platform and issues that they stand for, other than trying to smear the other guy.
But, this is there way to ensure that they win undeserved elections. By killing Democracy.



"In Washington, the real insiders know that the true outrages are what’s perfectly legal and that it’s simply a gaffe when someone accidentally blurts out something honest.

And so it barely made a ripple last week when a Texas congressman (and Donald Trump’s former White House physician) said aloud what’s supposed to be kept to a backroom whisper: Republicans intend to retake the US House of Representatives in 2022 through gerrymandering.

“We have redistricting coming up and the Republicans control most of that process in most of the states around the country,” Representative Ronny Jackson told a conference of religious conservatives. “That alone should get us the majority back.”


He’s right. Republicans won’t have to win more votes next year to claim the US House.

In fact, everyone could vote the exact same way for Congress next year as they did in 2020 – when Democratic candidates nationwide won more than 4.7 million votes than Republicans and narrowly held the chamber – but under the new maps that will be in place, the Republican party would take control.

How is this possible? The Republican party only needs to win five seats to wrench the Speaker’s gavel from Nancy Pelosi. They could draw themselves a dozen – or more – through gerrymandering alone. Republicans could create at least two additional red seats in Texas and North Carolina, and another certain two in Georgia and Florida. Then could nab another in Kansas, Kentucky, Tennessee and New Hampshire.

They won’t need to embrace policies favored by a majority of Americans. All they need to do is rework maps to their favor in states where they hold complete control of the decennial redistricting that follows the census – some of which they have held since they gerrymandered them 10 years ago. Now they can double down on the undeserved majorities that they have seized and dominate another decade.

If Republicans aggressively maximize every advantage and crash through any of the usual guardrails – and they have given every indication that they will – there’s little Democrats can do. And after a 2019 US supreme court decision declared partisan gerrymandering a non-justiciable political issue, the federal courts will be powerless as well.

It’s one of the many time bombs that threatens representative democracy and American traditions of majority rule. It’s a sign of how much power they have – and how aggressively they intend to wield it – that Republicans aren’t even bothering to deny that they intend to implode it.

“We control redistricting,” boasted Stephen Stepanek, New Hampshire’s Republican state party chair. “I can stand here today and guarantee you that we will send a conservative Republican to Washington as a congressperson in 2022.”

In Kansas, Susan Wagle, the Republican party state senate president, campaigned on a promise to draw a gerrymandered map that “takes out” the only Democrat in the state’s congressional delegation. “We can do that,” Wagle boasted. “I guarantee you that we can draw four Republican congressional maps.”

Texas Republicans will look to reinforce a map that has held back demographic trends favoring Democrats over the last decade by, among other things, dividing liberal Austin into five pieces and attaching them to rural conservative counties in order to dilute Democratic votes. Texas will also have two additional seats next decade due largely to Latino population growth; in 2011, when similar growth created four new seats for Texas, Republicans managed to draw three for themselves.

North Carolina Republicans crafted a reliable 10-3 Republican delegation throughout the last decade. When the state supreme court declared the congressional map unconstitutional in 2019, it forced the creation of a fairer map in time for 2020. Democrats immediately gained two seats. But the state GOP will control the entire process once again this cycle, so those two seats will likely change side – and Republicans could find a way to draw themselves the seat the state gained after reapportionment.

Two Atlanta-area Democrats are in danger of being gerrymandered out of office by Republicans. The single Democratic member from Kentucky, and one of just two from Tennessee, are in jeopardy if Republicans choose to crack Louisville and Nashville, respectively, and scatter the urban areas across multiple districts. Florida Republicans ignored state constitution provisions against partisan gerrymandering in 2011 and created what a state court called a conspiracy to mount a secret, shadow redistricting process. It took the court until the 2016 election to unwind those ill-gotten GOP gains, however, which provides little incentive not to do the same thing once more. This time, a more conservative state supreme court might even allow those gains to stand.

Might Democrats try the same thing? Democrats might look to squeeze a couple seats from New York and one additional seat from Illinois and possibly Maryland. But that’s scarcely enough to counter the overall GOP edge. In Colorado, Oregon and Virginia, states controlled entirely by Democrats, the party has either created an independent redistricting commission or made a deal to give Republicans a seat at the table. Commissions also draw the lines in other Democratic strongholds like California, Washington and New Jersey. There are no seats to gain in overwhelmingly blue states like Massachusetts, New Mexico and Connecticut.

In many ways, the Republican edge is left over from 2010, when the party remade American politics with a plan called Redmap – short for the Redistricting Majority Project – that aimed to capture swing-state legislatures in places like North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan and Florida, among others. They’ve never handed them back. Now Redmap enters its second decade of dominance – just as the lawmakers it put into office continue rewriting swing-state election laws to benefit Republicans, under the unfounded pretext of “voter fraud” that did not occur during 2020.

Republicans already benefit from a structural advantage in the electoral college and the US Senate. Presidents that lost the popular vote have appointed five conservative justices to the US supreme court. Now get ready for a drunken bacchanalia of partisan gerrymandering that could make “hot vax summer” look like a chaste Victorian celebration.

Meanwhile, this is how a democracy withers and disappears – slowly, legally, and in plain sight."

Nebraska could theoretically swing 19 points to the right:

 

cavalot

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2003
12,617
9,296
113
Lol, from a guy who's voted his precious feelings. Sorry this is happening to you.
Nothing's happening to me. LOL. I could give a shit less about the whole thing. Trump is finished and that's all I cared about.

I just find it amusing that the whole "we got jobbed in an unfair election" party... are the ones who have been doing the most shenanigans with this gerrymandering crap.

I live in a red state... my vote matters but not really.
 
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JOHNNY N

Athletic Director
Sep 24, 2003
15,972
25,252
113
Nothing's happening to me. LOL. I could give a shit less about the whole thing. Trump is finished and that's all I cared about.

I just find it amusing that the whole "we got jobbed in an unfair election" party... are the ones who have been doing the most shenanigans with this gerrymandering crap.

I live in a red state... my vote matters but not really.


Sorry you are surrounded by all those evil racists. Lol. Muh feelings. So narrow minded.
 
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philosophusker

Athletic Director
Gold Member
Jan 16, 2004
15,037
18,156
113
Jonesboro, Arkansas (York, NE originally)
The Republican Party is far beyond winning any election by honest means, such as having a true platform and issues that they stand for, other than trying to smear the other guy.
But, this is there way to ensure that they win undeserved elections. By killing Democracy.



"In Washington, the real insiders know that the true outrages are what’s perfectly legal and that it’s simply a gaffe when someone accidentally blurts out something honest.

And so it barely made a ripple last week when a Texas congressman (and Donald Trump’s former White House physician) said aloud what’s supposed to be kept to a backroom whisper: Republicans intend to retake the US House of Representatives in 2022 through gerrymandering.

“We have redistricting coming up and the Republicans control most of that process in most of the states around the country,” Representative Ronny Jackson told a conference of religious conservatives. “That alone should get us the majority back.”


He’s right. Republicans won’t have to win more votes next year to claim the US House.

In fact, everyone could vote the exact same way for Congress next year as they did in 2020 – when Democratic candidates nationwide won more than 4.7 million votes than Republicans and narrowly held the chamber – but under the new maps that will be in place, the Republican party would take control.

How is this possible? The Republican party only needs to win five seats to wrench the Speaker’s gavel from Nancy Pelosi. They could draw themselves a dozen – or more – through gerrymandering alone. Republicans could create at least two additional red seats in Texas and North Carolina, and another certain two in Georgia and Florida. Then could nab another in Kansas, Kentucky, Tennessee and New Hampshire.

They won’t need to embrace policies favored by a majority of Americans. All they need to do is rework maps to their favor in states where they hold complete control of the decennial redistricting that follows the census – some of which they have held since they gerrymandered them 10 years ago. Now they can double down on the undeserved majorities that they have seized and dominate another decade.

If Republicans aggressively maximize every advantage and crash through any of the usual guardrails – and they have given every indication that they will – there’s little Democrats can do. And after a 2019 US supreme court decision declared partisan gerrymandering a non-justiciable political issue, the federal courts will be powerless as well.

It’s one of the many time bombs that threatens representative democracy and American traditions of majority rule. It’s a sign of how much power they have – and how aggressively they intend to wield it – that Republicans aren’t even bothering to deny that they intend to implode it.

“We control redistricting,” boasted Stephen Stepanek, New Hampshire’s Republican state party chair. “I can stand here today and guarantee you that we will send a conservative Republican to Washington as a congressperson in 2022.”

In Kansas, Susan Wagle, the Republican party state senate president, campaigned on a promise to draw a gerrymandered map that “takes out” the only Democrat in the state’s congressional delegation. “We can do that,” Wagle boasted. “I guarantee you that we can draw four Republican congressional maps.”

Texas Republicans will look to reinforce a map that has held back demographic trends favoring Democrats over the last decade by, among other things, dividing liberal Austin into five pieces and attaching them to rural conservative counties in order to dilute Democratic votes. Texas will also have two additional seats next decade due largely to Latino population growth; in 2011, when similar growth created four new seats for Texas, Republicans managed to draw three for themselves.

North Carolina Republicans crafted a reliable 10-3 Republican delegation throughout the last decade. When the state supreme court declared the congressional map unconstitutional in 2019, it forced the creation of a fairer map in time for 2020. Democrats immediately gained two seats. But the state GOP will control the entire process once again this cycle, so those two seats will likely change side – and Republicans could find a way to draw themselves the seat the state gained after reapportionment.

Two Atlanta-area Democrats are in danger of being gerrymandered out of office by Republicans. The single Democratic member from Kentucky, and one of just two from Tennessee, are in jeopardy if Republicans choose to crack Louisville and Nashville, respectively, and scatter the urban areas across multiple districts. Florida Republicans ignored state constitution provisions against partisan gerrymandering in 2011 and created what a state court called a conspiracy to mount a secret, shadow redistricting process. It took the court until the 2016 election to unwind those ill-gotten GOP gains, however, which provides little incentive not to do the same thing once more. This time, a more conservative state supreme court might even allow those gains to stand.

Might Democrats try the same thing? Democrats might look to squeeze a couple seats from New York and one additional seat from Illinois and possibly Maryland. But that’s scarcely enough to counter the overall GOP edge. In Colorado, Oregon and Virginia, states controlled entirely by Democrats, the party has either created an independent redistricting commission or made a deal to give Republicans a seat at the table. Commissions also draw the lines in other Democratic strongholds like California, Washington and New Jersey. There are no seats to gain in overwhelmingly blue states like Massachusetts, New Mexico and Connecticut.

In many ways, the Republican edge is left over from 2010, when the party remade American politics with a plan called Redmap – short for the Redistricting Majority Project – that aimed to capture swing-state legislatures in places like North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Michigan and Florida, among others. They’ve never handed them back. Now Redmap enters its second decade of dominance – just as the lawmakers it put into office continue rewriting swing-state election laws to benefit Republicans, under the unfounded pretext of “voter fraud” that did not occur during 2020.

Republicans already benefit from a structural advantage in the electoral college and the US Senate. Presidents that lost the popular vote have appointed five conservative justices to the US supreme court. Now get ready for a drunken bacchanalia of partisan gerrymandering that could make “hot vax summer” look like a chaste Victorian celebration.

Meanwhile, this is how a democracy withers and disappears – slowly, legally, and in plain sight."
Wish there was a way Dems could stop the steal.
 

cavalot

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2003
12,617
9,296
113
Sorry you are surrounded by all those evil racists. Lol. Muh feelings. So narrow minded.
LOL what? Who said anything about racist or my feelings. You're reaching this morning dude. Talk about narrow minded.
 

Bobfather

Athletic Director
Gold Member
Oct 6, 2002
14,585
7,494
113
50
And who cares? You still have to be a valid voter to vote. IMO we should all get a mail in ballot in the mail.... better yet we should all have multiple avenues to vote including online. Why should it be difficult?
No you don’t have to have an ID to vote in blue states!
 

cavalot

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2003
12,617
9,296
113
No you don’t have to have an ID to vote in blue states!
Im calling BS. While you may not have to present an ID you have to be a valid voter and US citizen.

California does not require voters to present photo identification. However, some voters may be asked to show a form of identification when voting if they are voting for the first time after registering to vote by mail and did not provide a driver license number, California identification number, or the last four digits of their social security number.[6][7]

The following list of accepted ID was current as of November 2019. Click here for the California Secretary of State page, "What to Bring to Your Polling Place," to ensure you have the most current information.

  • Copy of a recent utility bill
  • Sample ballot booklet sent from the county elections office to the voter
  • Document sent to the voter by a government agency
  • Passport
  • Driver’s license
  • Official state identification card
  • Student identification that includes name and photograph

Background​

As of April 2021, 35 states enforced (or were scheduled to begin enforcing) voter identification requirements. A total of 21 states required voters to present photo identification at the polls; the remainder accepted other forms of identification. Valid forms of identification differ by state. Commonly accepted forms of ID include driver's licenses, state-issued identification cards, and military identification cards.[8][9]

Furthermore...

Fact-check: Do states verify U.S. citizenship as a condition for voting?​

Amy Sherman, PolitiFact.com

View Comments
Donald Trump: “No state in the country verifies United States citizenship as a condition for voting in federal elections.”
PolitiFact’s ruling: Mostly False
Here’s why: One of President Donald Trump’s many recent complaints about the U.S. election system is that states are lax in securing their voter rolls.
"Most Americans would also be shocked to learn that no state in the country verifies United States citizenship as a condition for voting in federal elections," Trump said in his 46-minute speech overflowing with falsehoods about voter fraud. "This is a national disgrace."
Trump has made false statements about noncitizen voters since his 2016 campaign, relying on faulty evidence. He’s revived the talking point in the weeks since the Nov. 3 election, which he lost to Democratic President-elect Joe Biden.

In this case, he has a point that the federal form that registers someone to vote doesn’t require documentation to show proof of citizenship. But Trump left out the efforts by many states to cross-check their records with available data to avoid this problem.

Lofty penalties for lying​

People who wish to register to vote must attest under penalty of perjury that they are citizens and eligible to vote, according to federal law.

Both the federal registration form and state versions warn that making false statements is a crime and that noncitizens should not fill out the form.
The consequences for noncitizens registering or voting include deportation, incarceration or fines. Noncitizens risk that a government official will check their voting record during a background check if they apply for naturalization.
"So anyone who’s not a citizen, and lies, is setting themselves up not only for future prosecution, but tanking their ability to become a citizen some day," said Loyola Law School professor Justin Levitt.
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In an Arizona voting case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2013 that states are obligated to permit registration for federal elections using the federal form, which does not require documentary proof of citizenship. States may have their own form, but they must be willing to accept the federal form. Trump’s spokesperson didn’t respond to our request for evidence, but he specified "federal elections" in his statement.

Databases and driver’s licenses: How states limit noncitizen voting​

It’s not apparent from Trump’s claim, but many states have tried various means of confirming the citizenship status of voters. These methods have not been foolproof and have led to some errors and legal fights.
Some states have permission to use a federal resource of data, called the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements, or SAVE, for the purposes of verifying that voter registration applicants are citizens. Implemented in 1987 and administered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, SAVE was originally intended to verify eligibility for government benefits, such as Medicaid. SAVE is not a database of people who are U.S. citizens, but it will show a person’s immigration or citizenship status.
Arizona and Colorado election officials told us that they use SAVE. Florida tried, but it did not go well.
Florida election officials briefly used SAVE in 2012 as part of a voter purge effort, but it wrongly flagged many voters including a Brooklyn-born World War II veteran. The state scrapped the effort.
Some states look at driver’s license records to see whether any noncitizens also registered to vote. But driver’s license records can be outdated and may not reflect if a noncitizen later became a naturalized citizen. That’s part of why an effort in Texas to find noncitizen voters fell apart in 2019.

Wendy Underhill, an election expert at the National Conference of State Legislatures, said that in some states, driver’s license records are better for verifying citizenship than they’ve ever been. Some state driver’s license systems are set up to ask a person if they want to register to vote only after they have shown a birth certificate or naturalization paper that proves citizenship.
We contacted election officials in a few states to ask what steps they take to verify that voters are citizens.
In Colorado, election officials review the entire voter registration database to see if anyone is registered who showed a non-U.S. credential to receive a driver’s license. The state uses the SAVE database as needed.
In Georgia, applications for voter registration are compared with data from the state Department of Driver Services and the Social Security Administration.
In cases where the information does not match or an applicant is flagged as a noncitizen, the application is moved to pending status, and the applicant is notified as to how to resolve it, said Joe Sorenson, a spokesperson for Gwinnett County, outside Atlanta. The steps include a list of acceptable documents for proof of citizenship that can be submitted immediately or when they vote. They are not moved to the voter rolls until they can prove citizenship.

States with laws on the books, but not in practice​

Four states have laws on the books that require additional proof of citizenship to register at the time of application, but only Arizona’s is actually in effect, said Dale Ho, director of the voting rights project at the ACLU.

In Arizona, applicants using the state registration form must provide proof of citizenship to be a "full ballot" voter to cast votes in local, state and federal races. That proof can be a state-issued ID such as a driver’s license, as long as they obtained it while they were citizens, or other forms such as naturalization documents, birth certificate or passport. If the applicant provides a driver’s license number, election officials will verify their citizenship using state motor vehicle records.
If applicants attest that they are citizens but provide no proof and the state can’t verify their citizenship, those applicants can vote in federal races only. About 25,000 of the state’s 4.2 million voters are "federal only" voters.
Kansas, Alabama and Georgia also have laws requiring documentary proof, but none is in effect. Kansas’ law was struck down in federal court in April; Alabama and Georgia never enforced their laws.
A spokesperson for the Kansas secretary of state told us that they don’t independently verify proof of citizenship.

Our ruling​

Trump said, "No state in the country verifies United States citizenship as a condition for voting in federal elections."
The kernel of truth here is that the federal form to register to vote doesn’t require documentation to prove citizenship. But applicants who use that federal form, or register using state forms, must attest to being citizens. Voter registration forms warn applicants that signing the form with false information is a crime. There have been scattered cases of non-citizens who cast ballots, but among millions of votes cast they are statistically rare.

Some states told us that they access federal or state databases to verify citizenship of voters. Such methods have sometimes erroneously flagged citizen voters. While they are not foolproof, they do contradict Trump’s claim that no states verify U.S. citizenship for federal elections.
We rate this statement Mostly False.

Sources​

Rev.com, Donald Trump Speech on Election Fraud Claims Transcript, Dec. 2
U.S. Department of Justice, The National Voter Registration Act of 2003
U.S. Election Assistance Commission, National Voter Registration Form
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, SAVE
Voter registration forms in Ohio, North Carolina, Arizona and Florida
NPR, Some Noncitizens Do Wind Up Registered To Vote, But Usually Not On Purpose, Feb. 26, 2019
Supreme Court of the United States, Secretary of State of Kansas vs Steven Wayne Fish brief in opposition of respondents, 2020
Brennan Center for Justice at NYU school of law, Proof of Citizenship Action Illegal, Federal Suit Says, Feb. 12, 2016
Texas Tribune, Texas will end its botched voter citizenship review and rescind its list of flagged voters, April 26, 2019
New York Times, Illegal Voting Gets Texas Woman 8 Years in Prison, and Certain Deportation, Feb. 10, 2017
 

JOHNNY N

Athletic Director
Sep 24, 2003
15,972
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And who cares? You still have to be a valid voter to vote. IMO we should all get a mail in ballot in the mail.... better yet we should all have multiple avenues to vote including online. Why should it be difficult?
The fact that you believe any of that shows how narrow minded your view of the world is
 
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cavalot

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2003
12,617
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I didn't say that.
Well everything I stated about making voting easier is exactly what Trump is claiming was the crux of his failed election. Seems to me that is where you are coming from with your statement.
 

philosophusker

Athletic Director
Gold Member
Jan 16, 2004
15,037
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Jonesboro, Arkansas (York, NE originally)
They’re doing everything they can by giving away our futures. I wonder how many votes they’ve created through their giveaway programs.
At least the Dems have a platform. All pubs do is bitch and moan.

Figure out a way to actually help poor people instead of steal from them, and maybe they will vote for your crappy party.
 
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Jaemekon

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Apr 23, 2007
5,290
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At least the Dems have a platform. All pubs do is bitch and moan.

Figure out a way to actually help poor people instead of steal from them, and maybe they will vote for your crappy party.

"You can beat a horse to do death, but then you can't drown it in water."

Same can be said for humans, most are just too selfish, and lack the foresight to realize they will destroy their lives with poor decisions. Eventually the blame game begins, but humans dig their own graves. Most just don't like the quality of grave they have created for themselves.
 

JOHNNY N

Athletic Director
Sep 24, 2003
15,972
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Well everything I stated about making voting easier is exactly what Trump is claiming was the crux of his failed election. Seems to me that is where you are coming from with your statement.
Sure it is. Sure. Lofl. Small world view.
 

stevehammer

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Sep 18, 2001
5,722
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What do people expect of politicians? How is this "news" anyway, because someone at yahoo thinks it might, or could happen?

Someone could show up at a Walmart in iowa with a bomb. Let's get an article about that.

It just seems like a pointless article, that's all. I'm just tired of worthless media lately.

EnormousThriftyArcticwolf-max-1mb.gif
Not everyone is informed on this topic. It's a very important thing to be talking about.

Lol, from a guy who's voted his precious feelings. Sorry this is happening to you.
Republicans vote entirely on feelings, primarily fear and loathing, but now also this crying about being persecuted. Republicans are whiny, scared, hateful fools.
 
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Jaemekon

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Apr 23, 2007
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Not everyone is informed on this topic. It's a very important thing to be talking about.


Republicans vote entirely on feelings, primarily fear and loathing, but now also this crying about being persecuted. Republicans are whiny, scared, hateful fools.

People over here have never heard of Jerry meandering? I find that hard to believe, unless they didn't attend school past primary. In that case, sorry for the slavery.

It's level of importance is entirely opinion based, just like anything in existence.

I think having a serious discussion about pussy stink is important. Why do some broads not maintain the clam? Why do some broads have really stinky gashes, while others have a pussy that smells and tastes like candy?

The smell of gash is far more important to me than another talk about politicians behaving like politicians.

 

EriktheRed

Offensive Coordinator
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2001
8,256
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Not everyone is informed on this topic. It's a very important thing to be talking about.


Republicans vote entirely on feelings, primarily fear and loathing, but now also this crying about being persecuted. Republicans are whiny, scared, hateful fools.
Republicans vote entirely on feelings- LOL completely laughable

Republicans care that we are literally being overrun at our borders. You don't seem to be.

Republicans support gun rights and some dems do, but you personally seem to be for restrictions on average citizens much more than currently the case. The criminals don't follow those restrictions.

Republicans care about voters being the actual voters. Dems whine about ID's being hard to get. What a joke and if you argue this you clearly are an idiot.

Republicans care more fiscally than Dems by far. I'm not saying modern-day Repubs are for a balanced-budget, but there is no crazy 20 trillions dollar schemes being proposed by them.

Repubs are for keeping bad criminals in jail. Crazy parts of the dems are for bail reform AKA criminal enablement.

Repubs generally like the country where a growing about of Dems hate everything about the country.

Republicans champion equality and these days Dems focus primarily on equity which is evil.
 

maggs

Recruiting Coordinator
Gold Member
Dec 4, 2001
6,387
4,324
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At least the Dems have a platform. All pubs do is bitch and moan.

Figure out a way to actually help poor people instead of steal from them, and maybe they will vote for your crappy party.
The older I get, the more I can see the real needs that many have, but I cannot get past incentivizing people to not work. That is happening as we type, and it’s not right.
 
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