OPS no fall sports

dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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How do we know the COVID vaccine will work 100%..

They have trouble getting the flu vaccine right every flu season..
No vaccine is always "100%". What it does do even if you don't mount a great response to it is to greatly reduce the severity of disease. I should have said that anybody dying of the virus has nobody to blame but themselves. That said, in animals Corona virus vaccines tend to be very effective. This one should be no different in humans. This vaccine is not a guess at trying to predict which strain of influenza is going to hit any given flu season. This vaccine is built specifically for this one virus which is not likely to change enough in my lifetime to necessitate a new vaccine. A different Corona virus might pop up some time and more than likely it will originate in China again just as SARS did.
 
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John_J_Rambo

Senior
Jan 10, 2020
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Ahhhh no. That last part is all bunk.

However, I would like to ask you a question you would actually know about: to reach herd-immunity, at least, according to the Netflix episodes on COVID-19, you need to hit a certain percentage of the population having the antibodies and that number is never 100%. They indicate in the show that it would likely be 40-60%. The idea being, you don't have to have everyone be immune to close off enough vectors for the virus to basically be ineffective at spreading very far. That all checks out, right?

I bring that up because, while I think a vaccine is coming soon too, I don't think it will be readily available until Q1 2021 at the earliest, but when it is, we're talking about needing roughly 200 million shots for the U.S., if those percentages are correct, which sounds like a lot but actually isn't really that bad for one or a number of drug manufacturers to hit once the vaccine is proven and manufacturing can be gone after full bore.
hey, mr know-it-all, you might want to read this before once again plowing ahead with agenda-based assumptions, this time about the lack of rise in suicides due to covid response:

https://www.abqjournal.com/1472694/shadow-deaths-of-the-virus.html

NM has reported a nearly equal rise in suicides as deaths from covid.

extremely sad to just wave a hand at this, calling it bunk, because those you worship haven't told you it's so.
 
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leodisflowers

Graduate Assistant
Feb 25, 2011
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North Carolina
https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/ece0db09da4d4ca68252c3967aa1e9dd

27000+ total cases in Nebraska
11000+ cases in Douglas county

over 1800 cases the last 14 day in douglas county

The CDC Director specifically called out Nebraska as concerning - over 40% of the cases in Nebraska come from Douglas County
As of this morning, 11,036 cases in Douglas County. 135 deaths so far. Spread is unmitigated because Nebraskans are not understanding the severity of this.
Are you sure these are all active? Nebraska according to Worldometers has had 27K total cases with only 7K active and 20 K recovered.
 

ZaneHickey

Defensive Coordinator
Dec 3, 2004
7,255
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This is all about the teachers and their union. I guess IF I were a 50+ year old teacher just hanging on so I can retire and then go double dip, that I might be reluctant to go in to a classroom as well with a bunch of 17-18 year olds. Younger kids? Almost zero risk to the teachers. They're more at risk from hanging out in the teacher's lounge.

As a side note, I just found out that a friend in her 70s with at least one comorbidity, tested positive back in late March. Her and her immunosuppressed older husband got tested because they had been flying a lot back and forth to Vegas and Houston. She thought she had a few chills one night. Turns out she had Covid and that's all the symptoms she got, one night of chills. He never got sick and wasn't positive at least at that time. We saw them last night sitting at a bar having supper.
There are a "concerning number" of new cases where I live, but mild and brief symptoms and little to no action at the hospitals. Love the mention of the teachers' lounge! Harkens back to the days of a smokey haze in that place.Eek
 
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dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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We don't, but the flu is a different type of virus. The current coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is novel, meaning new, and it hasn't undergone a seasonal, significant mutation yet (though apparently there are at least two known strains of it right now that indicate that it can and will mutate). We're getting the vaccine ready to treat it as it is. If this thing sticks around forever like the flu does, you will see vaccines annually that will be much more akin to the flu vaccine, where assumptions are made about the characteristics of the mutation in an effort to try to vaccinate before the virus really starts to spread. Those, as you correctly point out, range between 25% and 60% efficacy in any given year, depending on how close the assumptions were to reality.
Your expertise in understanding and discussing viral mutations and vaccine, is lacking.
 
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DudznSudz

Senior
Feb 4, 2016
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Are you sure these are all active? Nebraska according to Worldometers has had 27K total cases with only 7K active and 20 K recovered.
No, I am not sure they are all active. It's just the Google search that yields the map that the NYTimes is running. It probably means as a total.
 

dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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Please elaborate, it is good to learn new things. Where was I incorrect?
trying to equate mutations in a Corona virus with an influenza virus is where you took the wrong path. IF we need to add a new Corona virus vaccine it likely won't be because this one mutated given the number of antigens from the virus that the vaccine will include. IF we need to add a new vaccine or change this one it will likely be because a totally new (novel) virus will emerge in China. The experience we're gaining with this vaccine development will make it much much easier to do the next time IMO.
 
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Dean Pope

Offensive Coordinator
Oct 11, 2001
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Colorado, Minnesota...maybe you missed that.
What tripped me up was you saying "multiple neighboring states". I guess multiple can actually mean two, but Minnesota is not a neighboring state and Colorado shares a border with Nebraska but it's hundreds of miles from Omaha. You made it sound like she was going along with the crowd, when in reality no other district anywhere near OPS is making this decision at this time.

You can say you disagree with the decision, but it was not following the crowd. At least not in this state.
 

huskerfan1414

Graduate Assistant
Oct 25, 2014
5,531
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OPS is an absolutely terrible, bloated district with far too many administrators sucking taxpayers dry with lackluster results.
There’s also too many teachers in that district who think a little too highly of themselves and are there for the wrong reasons.
This decision makes no sense at all, so I’m not surprised OPS made it. Just like their 2 day week school makes no sense because now those kids will be with grandma half the week after picking up covid instead of at school where they are safe and unharmed by this virus. And now grandma is gonna get it and shes the one who is at risk from it.

Scamdemic, without a doubt.
Get your kids out of OPS. Private, charter, or nearby districts need pushed.
 

DudznSudz

Senior
Feb 4, 2016
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trying to equate mutations in a Corona virus with an influenza virus is where you took the wrong path. IF we need to add a new Corona virus vaccine it likely won't be because this one mutated given the number of antigens from the virus that the vaccine will include. IF we need to add a new vaccine or change this one it will likely be because a totally new (novel) virus will emerge in China. The experience we're gaining with this vaccine development will make it much much easier to do the next time IMO.
Oh! You know, I was wondering about that. From what I understand, SARS-1 and MERS did not/do not mutate very much, which is why after their initial outbreaks they did not really come back again in a significant way. Are you saying coronaviruses are less likely to act like the flu does, mutating significantly on a near-annual basis?
 

dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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Are you sure these are all active? Nebraska according to Worldometers has had 27K total cases with only 7K active and 20 K recovered.
One thing to remember is that the CDC estimated that there were nationally roughly 11 times more actual cases than have been proven via testing. Missouri I think at that time they estimated had 24X more cases than they had confirmed. Nebraska very well could have already had 250,000 cases by now using that CDC estimate from weeks ago.
 

dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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As of this morning, 11,036 cases in Douglas County. 135 deaths so far. Spread is unmitigated because Nebraskans are not understanding the severity of this.
The largest number of new cases are in less vulnerable people. Testing has ramped up dramatically over the past several weeks in our area. Perhaps Nebraskans do in fact "understand the severity" and are acting accordingly. My 89 year old mother-in-law says "I've only got a year or two left at most anyway. I'll be damned if I'm going to spend one of them holed up in my house." I know ONE guy who died after having COVID and he was dying of stage 4 cancer. ALL of the other people I know who have had it from their 50s to 70s have either had no symptoms or were over a flu like illness and back to work in less than 2 weeks. The only young patients (30s) we've seen die from this in my area have been morbidly obese diabetics. Even the rate of hospitalization from this virus is ridiculously low compared to what we were led to believe. When you've been lied to and misled by the CDC, it's tough for many people to heed their warnings.
 
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dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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Oh! You know, I was wondering about that. From what I understand, SARS-1 and MERS did not/do not mutate very much, which is why after their initial outbreaks they did not really come back again in a significant way. Are you saying coronaviruses are less likely to act like the flu does, mutating significantly on a near-annual basis?
That has been the experience with Corona virus animal vaccines. Some of them have been around for 40 years and are still effective.
 

leodisflowers

Graduate Assistant
Feb 25, 2011
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North Carolina
One thing to remember is that the CDC estimated that there were nationally roughly 11 times more actual cases than have been proven via testing. Missouri I think at that time they estimated had 24X more cases than they had confirmed. Nebraska very well could have already had 250,000 cases by now using that CDC estimate from weeks ago.
Agreed, and in another thread I talked about that herd immunity might not be 70%, but instead like 25-30% based on T-Cells. At the end of the day, kids should be in school.
 

dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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Agreed, and in another thread I talked about that herd immunity might not be 70%, but instead like 25-30% based on T-Cells. At the end of the day, kids should be in school.
I'm hopeful that the immunologist from Oxford is correct on that theory. Clearly there's something going on which explains the number of people who get exposed but don't get sick. A 70+ year old friend of mine's wife had the virus and he didn't even get a sniffle and has never tested positive. I think its going to be really interesting to see IF workers who work in confined animal operations are less susceptible to serious disease from this. That might infer that there is some cross protection from some other specie's Corona viruses. The chicken processing plant's degree of asymptomatic cases in Arkansas that time sure makes you wonder. If I recall correctly they had over 400 positive tests with zero symptomatic cases.
 
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Crazyhole

Junior
Jun 4, 2004
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Agreed, and in another thread I talked about that herd immunity might not be 70%, but instead like 25-30% based on T-Cells. At the end of the day, kids should be in school.
Its 20-25%. Thats pretty clear at this point based on New York and Florida.
 

dinglefritz

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 14, 2011
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Its 20-25%. Thats pretty clear at this point based on New York and Florida.
well actually the Bronx had a much higher infection rate than that BUT given the way they live and the public transportation that shouldn't surprise anybody. The problem for developing a "population immunity" is that this country isn't a stagnant confined situation. We're way too mobile when it comes to developing that immunity. What I'm hopeful of is that the actual EXPOSURE rate in New York was closer to 100% and that many people due to either some genetic reason OR T cell cross protection to other strains of Corona virus, never contracted COVID.
 

JohnRossEwing

Offensive Coordinator
Jul 4, 2013
9,333
7,120
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The next question asked will they have Spring Football and Volleyball?
My guess, VB won't bother. HS VB (for the good schools) is dominated by club/select crap, so I don't see HS VB moving to spring.

FB, probably. which means now I am not sure if I want to coach in the spring or not. Lord knows the team won't miss me.
 

Blindcheck

Walk On
Oct 14, 2007
120
87
28
You missed the study that showed that in fact the WHO spokesperson was correct when she said that asymptomatic transmission is extremely rare IF it happens at all. What is actually happening is that people who have very mild symptoms don't stay home because they think they're just tired or have allergic rhinitis. A retrospective study out of Oxford supported that.
I saw that study...but it stated that Pre-symptomatic people do transmit the disease...the ones that eventually show symptoms. Pre-symptomatic is different than asymptomatic...as asymptomatic never have any symptoms but Pre-symptomatic just haven't shown any symptoms yet.
 

Crazyhole

Junior
Jun 4, 2004
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well actually the Bronx had a much higher infection rate than that BUT given the way they live and the public transportation that shouldn't surprise anybody. The problem for developing a "population immunity" is that this country isn't a stagnant confined situation. We're way too mobile when it comes to developing that immunity. What I'm hopeful of is that the actual EXPOSURE rate in New York was closer to 100% and that many people due to either some genetic reason OR T cell cross protection to other strains of Corona virus, never contracted COVID.
All that does is change the timeline that it takes to get there. It will happen faster in dense urban areas than it does in rural areas. We will still all get there, and when we do cases will level out and eventually disappear in essence. The R/0 of this is nowhere nearly as high as they thought it was.
 

Nebraska_Reality

Sophomore
Oct 23, 2019
1,074
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I'm still searching for the breakdown of age, gender, etc, but Nebraska since July 1st has had 59 deaths. So like 1.5 per day and they are probably the older population based on stats; the new cases are pretty flat and our hospitals are not overwhelmed, yet we are talking kids can't go back to school? There are currently 7,300 active cases which show .38% of the NE population is infected. If you run the numbers on those for school age kids, you are going to find a higher chance of getting hit by a an asteroid than dying of this thing, so tell me again why NE kids shouldn't be in school? This isn't a tough decision, this is a horrible decision. If we were experiencing NY type numbers I might go with your argument, but the silly season is upon us.
Death and being perfectly fine are not the only 2 outcomes with this virus....and we need to stop thinking of it in those terms.

If I were to get this, I'm more concerned about some of the non-fatal outcomes (severe lung damage, strokes, severe loss of cognitive function) than I am about dying.
 

scarletred

Nebraska Legend
Jun 17, 2001
34,528
11,358
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Death and being perfectly fine are not the only 2 outcomes with this virus....and we need to stop thinking of it in those terms.

If I were to get this, I'm more concerned about some of the non-fatal outcomes (severe lung damage, strokes, severe loss of cognitive function) than I am about dying.
I suggest you stay away from Sturges, South Dakota..

Love if you went.Winking
 
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baseball31ne

Recruiting Coordinator
Mar 8, 2002
6,105
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Ops teacher Union was pushing hard for nothing in person pretty hard. Even protesting on dodge street recently.
Final call no, but heavily influential with a super and board happy to agree.
 
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