One piece of advice for Martinez

inWV

Defensive Coordinator
Sep 22, 2007
7,252
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Mistakes and turnovers happen when AM is trying to get too much out of a play. Forcing a ball into coverage, getting the ball punched struggling for added yards. He should realize that he now has a defense that can get him the ball back, something that was less likely in 2018&2019. He is really at his best when he lets the game come to him and uses his skill players to accomplish that. If the RB is being used effectively, the QB run game is also more effective. And this in turn sets up the pass game. This offense flows from the play provided by the running backs to the pass game, not the other way around.
Chunk plays come when you quit worrying about getting chunk plays.
 

John_J_Rambo

Graduate Assistant
Jan 10, 2020
5,326
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Mistakes and turnovers happen when AM is trying to get too much out of a play. Forcing a ball into coverage, getting the ball punched struggling for added yards. He should realize that he now has a defense that can get him the ball back, something that was less likely in 2018&2019. He is really at his best when he lets the game come to him and uses his skill players to accomplish that. If the RB is being used effectively, the QB run game is also more effective. And this in turn sets up the pass game. This offense flows from the play provided by the running backs to the pass game, not the other way around.
Chunk plays come when you quit worrying about getting chunk plays.
AM is at his best when the ball is out of his hands.

Here’s hoping we either hand it off 80% of plays or he never takes another snap.
 

JaySker402

Junior
Jan 14, 2017
1,683
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Omaha
An incomplete pass is better than an interception. Throw it away vs trying to force it somewhere.
 

inWV

Defensive Coordinator
Sep 22, 2007
7,252
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113
An incomplete pass is better than an interception. Throw it away vs trying to force it somewhere.
The tendency to look for the bigger play is always there. More than once I yelled at the TV after an incomplete roll out pass was the result rather than AM running out of bounds in front to the first down marker. Take the easy yardage. Get out of bounds, slide rather than taking a hit, move the chains.
 

ThereIsNoPlace

Blackshirt
Nov 29, 2014
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tenor.gif
 

PeliniTheCrutch

All-American
Jul 4, 2016
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My advice for him:

Have the best off-season of your lifetime, then don't stink it up in games.

I don't have a ton of confidence in the 2nd part, but he's really all there is, so I'll still root for it to happen.
 

inWV

Defensive Coordinator
Sep 22, 2007
7,252
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113
From AM's Husker Bio -
Martinez was also recognized as an honorable-mention All-Big Ten selection and a freshman All-American.
Martinez ranked 12th nationally in total offense per game in 2018 and was first among freshmen. Martinez’s average of 295.1 yards of total offense per game was the ninth-highest mark by a freshman in NCAA history and the third-best mark by a true freshman.
What did AM have in 2018? Zig as a 1,000 yard rusher and Stan as a 1,000 yard receiver (with JD having 818).
 
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CT-NUred

Walk On
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Dec 2, 2014
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From AM's Husker Bio -
Martinez was also recognized as an honorable-mention All-Big Ten selection and a freshman All-American.
Martinez ranked 12th nationally in total offense per game in 2018 and was first among freshmen. Martinez’s average of 295.1 yards of total offense per game was the ninth-highest mark by a freshman in NCAA history and the third-best mark by a true freshman.
What did AM have in 2018? Zig as a 1,000 yard rusher and Stan as a 1,000 yard receiver (with JD having 818).

I'm not the sharpest tack in the drawer but I don't know if I've ever seen a freshman campaign that gave me so much hope....only to be followed by 2 years of WTF.
 

NikkiSixx

Recruiting Coordinator
Sep 14, 2013
6,206
4,537
113
Another piece of advice for Adrian..... Please leave after this year.
you know he's just gonna milk it.. just like he's been doing for the past 3 years.

We are going to see a good year 4 defense.. offense? not so much. and who's fault is it for allowing this to occur?

Well his day is coming too.
 

BK1

Newbie
Sep 27, 2001
48
39
18
Mistakes and turnovers happen when AM is trying to get too much out of a play. Forcing a ball into coverage, getting the ball punched struggling for added yards. He should realize that he now has a defense that can get him the ball back, something that was less likely in 2018&2019. He is really at his best when he lets the game come to him and uses his skill players to accomplish that. If the RB is being used effectively, the QB run game is also more effective. And this in turn sets up the pass game. This offense flows from the play provided by the running backs to the pass game, not the other way around.
Chunk plays come when you quit worrying about getting chunk plays.
I agree and if our defense plays as well as we expect it to he should realize he doesn't need to take as many risks.
 
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stucknks

Athletic Director
Jan 2, 2012
13,407
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Mistakes and turnovers happen when AM is trying to get too much out of a play. Forcing a ball into coverage, getting the ball punched struggling for added yards. He should realize that he now has a defense that can get him the ball back, something that was less likely in 2018&2019. He is really at his best when he lets the game come to him and uses his skill players to accomplish that. If the RB is being used effectively, the QB run game is also more effective. And this in turn sets up the pass game. This offense flows from the play provided by the running backs to the pass game, not the other way around.
Chunk plays come when you quit worrying about getting chunk plays.
I think Adrian will be just fine.
 

Cornicator

Nebraska Legend
Gold Member
Feb 27, 2009
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From AM's Husker Bio -
Martinez was also recognized as an honorable-mention All-Big Ten selection and a freshman All-American.
Martinez ranked 12th nationally in total offense per game in 2018 and was first among freshmen. Martinez’s average of 295.1 yards of total offense per game was the ninth-highest mark by a freshman in NCAA history and the third-best mark by a true freshman.
What did AM have in 2018? Zig as a 1,000 yard rusher and Stan as a 1,000 yard receiver (with JD having 818).


Nebraska has played 32 total games since 2018, when Frost took over. In the first 16 of those 32 games, Nebraska averaged 470 yards and 32 points per game.

In the last 16 games, Nebraska averaged 382 yards and 23 points per game.

In the first 16 games, Nebraska threw 27 TD passes.
In the last 16 games, Nebraska threw 9 TD passes.


Those numbers don't only include just Adrian. Andrew Bunch and Luke also threw 5 TD passes combined from 2018 to 2020.


So what happened after week 4 of the 2019 season? This kid flaked the fvck out:

2019-Northern-Illinois-football-Maurice-Washington-TD.jpg



In 2018, Nebraska averaged 456 yards per game and 5.4 yards per rush because defenses were forced to defend the whole field.

- Devine was a really good running back.
- Stan and JD were really good on the boundary
- Mo Washington was dangerous as hell in the passing game, and his presence alone forced defenses to change the way they defended Nebraska.


1. The first read on every pass play in this offense is the Vertical Route on the perimeter. If Nebraska has big play receivers who can stretch the field, this forces the defense to keep their safeties back and makes the corners almost irrelevant in run support. Suddenly, the running game is often defended by 7 instead of 11.

2. When you have legit boundary receivers, this forces the linebackers and/or the nickel to become over exposed in coverage of the Slot/ a RB/ and/or the TE.

3. If there is a legit "take it to the house" playmaker at RB in the passing game, like Mo and even Devine to an extent, this creates serious mismatches at the backer spot and forces the back 7 to defend every inch of the field vertically and horizontally.


So what happened to Nebraska's offense? Many of fans, who lack a conceptual understanding of football, blame Adrian Martinez for the struggles.

In reality, this is Scott Frost's fault for failing to sign difference makers at the skill positions.

Nebraska went from Stan Morgan, JD Spielman, Mo Washington, Jack Stoll, and Devine Ozigbo at the end of 2018, to Levi Falck, Kade Warner, Wyatt Liewer, Wandale, and Ronald Thompkins by week two of 2020.

That's on Scott Frost.

He never should've let Nebraska get to that situation from a skill talent standpoint. Part of that is on Walters, sure, but he should've been all over an elite WR recruiter by the time he arrived.

Secondly, Frost needs to learn to coach to his personnel. Its maddening to see Nebraska try and run the same offense with dramatically less talent. Don't try to throw the football 35 times when Kade Warner is your #1 option on the boundary.



These are many of the reasons why I will defend Adrian Martinez to the hilt. Its also why I laugh, like honestly mockingly belly laugh, at posters over here that think Nebraska could've done better in the transfer portal.

- There are 67 Power Five Football programs in College Football. When Nebraska started Falck, Warner, and Robinson the first 3 weeks of 2020, Nebraska ranked roughly 60th in overall receiver talent out of the Power 5.




Now... back to WV's initial point:

Adrian's fumbles are too many, and usually the result of trying to extend plays in traffic where he leaves his feet. His interception numbers are actually well below the average INT# of a D1 starting QB.

He's averaging an 1 Interception every 38 attempts.

Tommy Armstrong had 1 INT for every 26 passes.

Taylor Martinez had 1 INT for every 33 passes

Tanner Lee was 1 for every 26

Zac Lee had 1 INT for every 32 attempts

Joe Ganz wad 1 INT for every 32 attempts



Zac Taylor is the only QB with a better INT ratio of 1 INT for every 41 attempts.

Joe Dailey had an 1 INT for every 16 attempts -- YIKES
 

litespeedhuskerfan

Nebraska Football Hall of Fame
Aug 27, 2006
19,134
11,315
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Nebraska has played 32 total games since 2018, when Frost took over. In the first 16 of those 32 games, Nebraska averaged 470 yards and 32 points per game.

In the last 16 games, Nebraska averaged 382 yards and 23 points per game.

In the first 16 games, Nebraska threw 27 TD passes.
In the last 16 games, Nebraska threw 9 TD passes.


Those numbers don't only include just Adrian. Andrew Bunch and Luke also threw 5 TD passes combined from 2018 to 2020.


So what happened after week 4 of the 2019 season? This kid flaked the fvck out:

2019-Northern-Illinois-football-Maurice-Washington-TD.jpg



In 2018, Nebraska averaged 456 yards per game and 5.4 yards per rush because defenses were forced to defend the whole field.

- Devine was a really good running back.
- Stan and JD were really good on the boundary
- Mo Washington was dangerous as hell in the passing game, and his presence alone forced defenses to change the way they defended Nebraska.


1. The first read on every pass play in this offense is the Vertical Route on the perimeter. If Nebraska has big play receivers who can stretch the field, this forces the defense to keep their safeties back and makes the corners almost irrelevant in run support. Suddenly, the running game is often defended by 7 instead of 11.

2. When you have legit boundary receivers, this forces the linebackers and/or the nickel to become over exposed in coverage of the Slot/ a RB/ and/or the TE.

3. If there is a legit "take it to the house" playmaker at RB in the passing game, like Mo and even Devine to an extent, this creates serious mismatches at the backer spot and forces the back 7 to defend every inch of the field vertically and horizontally.


So what happened to Nebraska's offense? Many of fans, who lack a conceptual understanding of football, blame Adrian Martinez for the struggles.

In reality, this is Scott Frost's fault for failing to sign difference makers at the skill positions.

Nebraska went from Stan Morgan, JD Spielman, Mo Washington, Jack Stoll, and Devine Ozigbo at the end of 2018, to Levi Falck, Kade Warner, Wyatt Liewer, Wandale, and Ronald Thompkins by week two of 2020.

That's on Scott Frost.

He never should've let Nebraska get to that situation from a skill talent standpoint. Part of that is on Walters, sure, but he should've been all over an elite WR recruiter by the time he arrived.

Secondly, Frost needs to learn to coach to his personnel. Its maddening to see Nebraska try and run the same offense with dramatically less talent. Don't try to throw the football 35 times when Kade Warner is your #1 option on the boundary.



These are many of the reasons why I will defend Adrian Martinez to the hilt. Its also why I laugh, like honestly mockingly belly laugh, at posters over here that think Nebraska could've done better in the transfer portal.

- There are 67 Power Five Football programs in College Football. When Nebraska started Falck, Warner, and Robinson the first 3 weeks of 2020, Nebraska ranked roughly 60th in overall receiver talent out of the Power 5.




Now... back to WV's initial point:

Adrian's fumbles are too many, and usually the result of trying to extend plays in traffic where he leaves his feet. His interception numbers are actually well below the average INT# of a D1 starting QB.

He's averaging an 1 Interception every 38 attempts.

Tommy Armstrong had 1 INT for every 26 passes.

Taylor Martinez had 1 INT for every 33 passes

Tanner Lee was 1 for every 26

Zac Lee had 1 INT for every 32 attempts

Joe Ganz wad 1 INT for every 32 attempts



Zac Taylor is the only QB with a better INT ratio of 1 INT for every 41 attempts.

Joe Dailey had an 1 INT for every 16 attempts -- YIKES

Callahan had to look at game film and think WTF did I get myself into re: Dailey
 
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kidofSN

Sophomore
Gold Member
Jul 4, 2007
1,404
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Frost's problems started with telling Martinez when he recruited him he was his guy period. That has continued all this time. Add in running off some good players instead of adapting. We have a losing coach with little chance of that changing I am afraid. Would love to be wrong.
 
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inWV

Defensive Coordinator
Sep 22, 2007
7,252
4,902
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Nebraska has played 32 total games since 2018, when Frost took over. In the first 16 of those 32 games, Nebraska averaged 470 yards and 32 points per game.

In the last 16 games, Nebraska averaged 382 yards and 23 points per game.

In the first 16 games, Nebraska threw 27 TD passes.
In the last 16 games, Nebraska threw 9 TD passes.


Those numbers don't only include just Adrian. Andrew Bunch and Luke also threw 5 TD passes combined from 2018 to 2020.


So what happened after week 4 of the 2019 season? This kid flaked the fvck out:

2019-Northern-Illinois-football-Maurice-Washington-TD.jpg



In 2018, Nebraska averaged 456 yards per game and 5.4 yards per rush because defenses were forced to defend the whole field.

- Devine was a really good running back.
- Stan and JD were really good on the boundary
- Mo Washington was dangerous as hell in the passing game, and his presence alone forced defenses to change the way they defended Nebraska.


1. The first read on every pass play in this offense is the Vertical Route on the perimeter. If Nebraska has big play receivers who can stretch the field, this forces the defense to keep their safeties back and makes the corners almost irrelevant in run support. Suddenly, the running game is often defended by 7 instead of 11.

2. When you have legit boundary receivers, this forces the linebackers and/or the nickel to become over exposed in coverage of the Slot/ a RB/ and/or the TE.

3. If there is a legit "take it to the house" playmaker at RB in the passing game, like Mo and even Devine to an extent, this creates serious mismatches at the backer spot and forces the back 7 to defend every inch of the field vertically and horizontally.


So what happened to Nebraska's offense? Many of fans, who lack a conceptual understanding of football, blame Adrian Martinez for the struggles.

In reality, this is Scott Frost's fault for failing to sign difference makers at the skill positions.

Nebraska went from Stan Morgan, JD Spielman, Mo Washington, Jack Stoll, and Devine Ozigbo at the end of 2018, to Levi Falck, Kade Warner, Wyatt Liewer, Wandale, and Ronald Thompkins by week two of 2020.

That's on Scott Frost.

He never should've let Nebraska get to that situation from a skill talent standpoint. Part of that is on Walters, sure, but he should've been all over an elite WR recruiter by the time he arrived.

Secondly, Frost needs to learn to coach to his personnel. Its maddening to see Nebraska try and run the same offense with dramatically less talent. Don't try to throw the football 35 times when Kade Warner is your #1 option on the boundary.



These are many of the reasons why I will defend Adrian Martinez to the hilt. Its also why I laugh, like honestly mockingly belly laugh, at posters over here that think Nebraska could've done better in the transfer portal.

- There are 67 Power Five Football programs in College Football. When Nebraska started Falck, Warner, and Robinson the first 3 weeks of 2020, Nebraska ranked roughly 60th in overall receiver talent out of the Power 5.




Now... back to WV's initial point:

Adrian's fumbles are too many, and usually the result of trying to extend plays in traffic where he leaves his feet. His interception numbers are actually well below the average INT# of a D1 starting QB.

He's averaging an 1 Interception every 38 attempts.

Tommy Armstrong had 1 INT for every 26 passes.

Taylor Martinez had 1 INT for every 33 passes

Tanner Lee was 1 for every 26

Zac Lee had 1 INT for every 32 attempts

Joe Ganz wad 1 INT for every 32 attempts



Zac Taylor is the only QB with a better INT ratio of 1 INT for every 41 attempts.

Joe Dailey had an 1 INT for every 16 attempts -- YIKES
I forgot Mo. That kid had really special athletic skills, essentially still playing Pop Warner get to the sideline first football. Something wrong up in the noggin. Will be waiting on the AM haters to explain away the INT data.
 

Cornicator

Nebraska Legend
Gold Member
Feb 27, 2009
43,221
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His lack of leadership and mental mistakes that continue to happen as a 3 year starter might have contributed to the fact that we have only won 5 out of our last 16 games played. THAT is not cool.

This is such a stupid take. What do you do for a living?
 

John_J_Rambo

Graduate Assistant
Jan 10, 2020
5,326
9,378
113
Nebraska has played 32 total games since 2018, when Frost took over. In the first 16 of those 32 games, Nebraska averaged 470 yards and 32 points per game.

In the last 16 games, Nebraska averaged 382 yards and 23 points per game.

In the first 16 games, Nebraska threw 27 TD passes.
In the last 16 games, Nebraska threw 9 TD passes.


Those numbers don't only include just Adrian. Andrew Bunch and Luke also threw 5 TD passes combined from 2018 to 2020.


So what happened after week 4 of the 2019 season? This kid flaked the fvck out:

2019-Northern-Illinois-football-Maurice-Washington-TD.jpg



In 2018, Nebraska averaged 456 yards per game and 5.4 yards per rush because defenses were forced to defend the whole field.

- Devine was a really good running back.
- Stan and JD were really good on the boundary
- Mo Washington was dangerous as hell in the passing game, and his presence alone forced defenses to change the way they defended Nebraska.


1. The first read on every pass play in this offense is the Vertical Route on the perimeter. If Nebraska has big play receivers who can stretch the field, this forces the defense to keep their safeties back and makes the corners almost irrelevant in run support. Suddenly, the running game is often defended by 7 instead of 11.

2. When you have legit boundary receivers, this forces the linebackers and/or the nickel to become over exposed in coverage of the Slot/ a RB/ and/or the TE.

3. If there is a legit "take it to the house" playmaker at RB in the passing game, like Mo and even Devine to an extent, this creates serious mismatches at the backer spot and forces the back 7 to defend every inch of the field vertically and horizontally.


So what happened to Nebraska's offense? Many of fans, who lack a conceptual understanding of football, blame Adrian Martinez for the struggles.

In reality, this is Scott Frost's fault for failing to sign difference makers at the skill positions.

Nebraska went from Stan Morgan, JD Spielman, Mo Washington, Jack Stoll, and Devine Ozigbo at the end of 2018, to Levi Falck, Kade Warner, Wyatt Liewer, Wandale, and Ronald Thompkins by week two of 2020.

That's on Scott Frost.

He never should've let Nebraska get to that situation from a skill talent standpoint. Part of that is on Walters, sure, but he should've been all over an elite WR recruiter by the time he arrived.

Secondly, Frost needs to learn to coach to his personnel. Its maddening to see Nebraska try and run the same offense with dramatically less talent. Don't try to throw the football 35 times when Kade Warner is your #1 option on the boundary.



These are many of the reasons why I will defend Adrian Martinez to the hilt. Its also why I laugh, like honestly mockingly belly laugh, at posters over here that think Nebraska could've done better in the transfer portal.

- There are 67 Power Five Football programs in College Football. When Nebraska started Falck, Warner, and Robinson the first 3 weeks of 2020, Nebraska ranked roughly 60th in overall receiver talent out of the Power 5.




Now... back to WV's initial point:

Adrian's fumbles are too many, and usually the result of trying to extend plays in traffic where he leaves his feet. His interception numbers are actually well below the average INT# of a D1 starting QB.

He's averaging an 1 Interception every 38 attempts.

Tommy Armstrong had 1 INT for every 26 passes.

Taylor Martinez had 1 INT for every 33 passes

Tanner Lee was 1 for every 26

Zac Lee had 1 INT for every 32 attempts

Joe Ganz wad 1 INT for every 32 attempts



Zac Taylor is the only QB with a better INT ratio of 1 INT for every 41 attempts.

Joe Dailey had an 1 INT for every 16 attempts -- YIKES
2 things can be true at the same time. for instance:

Frost has failed miserably to surround AM with skill guys

--AND--

AM stinks and is incapable of covering up any of the warts Frost has left untreated to the extend that it leads to wins
 

PeliniTheCrutch

All-American
Jul 4, 2016
4,299
5,742
113
Nebraska has played 32 total games since 2018, when Frost took over. In the first 16 of those 32 games, Nebraska averaged 470 yards and 32 points per game.

In the last 16 games, Nebraska averaged 382 yards and 23 points per game.

In the first 16 games, Nebraska threw 27 TD passes.
In the last 16 games, Nebraska threw 9 TD passes.


Those numbers don't only include just Adrian. Andrew Bunch and Luke also threw 5 TD passes combined from 2018 to 2020.


So what happened after week 4 of the 2019 season? This kid flaked the fvck out:

2019-Northern-Illinois-football-Maurice-Washington-TD.jpg



In 2018, Nebraska averaged 456 yards per game and 5.4 yards per rush because defenses were forced to defend the whole field.

- Devine was a really good running back.
- Stan and JD were really good on the boundary
- Mo Washington was dangerous as hell in the passing game, and his presence alone forced defenses to change the way they defended Nebraska.


1. The first read on every pass play in this offense is the Vertical Route on the perimeter. If Nebraska has big play receivers who can stretch the field, this forces the defense to keep their safeties back and makes the corners almost irrelevant in run support. Suddenly, the running game is often defended by 7 instead of 11.

2. When you have legit boundary receivers, this forces the linebackers and/or the nickel to become over exposed in coverage of the Slot/ a RB/ and/or the TE.

3. If there is a legit "take it to the house" playmaker at RB in the passing game, like Mo and even Devine to an extent, this creates serious mismatches at the backer spot and forces the back 7 to defend every inch of the field vertically and horizontally.


So what happened to Nebraska's offense? Many of fans, who lack a conceptual understanding of football, blame Adrian Martinez for the struggles.

In reality, this is Scott Frost's fault for failing to sign difference makers at the skill positions.

Nebraska went from Stan Morgan, JD Spielman, Mo Washington, Jack Stoll, and Devine Ozigbo at the end of 2018, to Levi Falck, Kade Warner, Wyatt Liewer, Wandale, and Ronald Thompkins by week two of 2020.

That's on Scott Frost.

He never should've let Nebraska get to that situation from a skill talent standpoint. Part of that is on Walters, sure, but he should've been all over an elite WR recruiter by the time he arrived.

Secondly, Frost needs to learn to coach to his personnel. Its maddening to see Nebraska try and run the same offense with dramatically less talent. Don't try to throw the football 35 times when Kade Warner is your #1 option on the boundary.



These are many of the reasons why I will defend Adrian Martinez to the hilt. Its also why I laugh, like honestly mockingly belly laugh, at posters over here that think Nebraska could've done better in the transfer portal.

- There are 67 Power Five Football programs in College Football. When Nebraska started Falck, Warner, and Robinson the first 3 weeks of 2020, Nebraska ranked roughly 60th in overall receiver talent out of the Power 5.




Now... back to WV's initial point:

Adrian's fumbles are too many, and usually the result of trying to extend plays in traffic where he leaves his feet. His interception numbers are actually well below the average INT# of a D1 starting QB.

He's averaging an 1 Interception every 38 attempts.

Tommy Armstrong had 1 INT for every 26 passes.

Taylor Martinez had 1 INT for every 33 passes

Tanner Lee was 1 for every 26

Zac Lee had 1 INT for every 32 attempts

Joe Ganz wad 1 INT for every 32 attempts



Zac Taylor is the only QB with a better INT ratio of 1 INT for every 41 attempts.

Joe Dailey had an 1 INT for every 16 attempts -- YIKES

So he fumbles too much. Yes, we know.
 

Bugeater

Offensive Coordinator
May 29, 2001
8,303
4,297
113
Surprise, AZ via North Platte
Mistakes and turnovers happen when AM is trying to get too much out of a play. Forcing a ball into coverage, getting the ball punched struggling for added yards. He should realize that he now has a defense that can get him the ball back, something that was less likely in 2018&2019. He is really at his best when he lets the game come to him and uses his skill players to accomplish that. If the RB is being used effectively, the QB run game is also more effective. And this in turn sets up the pass game. This offense flows from the play provided by the running backs to the pass game, not the other way around.
Chunk plays come when you quit worrying about getting chunk plays.


;)
 

Cornicator

Nebraska Legend
Gold Member
Feb 27, 2009
43,221
130,893
113
54
Meadville
2 things can be true at the same time. for instance:

Frost has failed miserably to surround AM with skill guys

--AND--

AM stinks and is incapable of covering up any of the warts Frost has left untreated to the extend that it leads to wins

Here's another fact:

You don't understand a fvckin thing about football.
 
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bigboxes

College Football Hall of Fame
Sep 4, 2004
23,697
9,258
113
Arlington, TX
Nebraska has played 32 total games since 2018, when Frost took over. In the first 16 of those 32 games, Nebraska averaged 470 yards and 32 points per game.

In the last 16 games, Nebraska averaged 382 yards and 23 points per game.

In the first 16 games, Nebraska threw 27 TD passes.
In the last 16 games, Nebraska threw 9 TD passes.


Those numbers don't only include just Adrian. Andrew Bunch and Luke also threw 5 TD passes combined from 2018 to 2020.


So what happened after week 4 of the 2019 season? This kid flaked the fvck out:

2019-Northern-Illinois-football-Maurice-Washington-TD.jpg



In 2018, Nebraska averaged 456 yards per game and 5.4 yards per rush because defenses were forced to defend the whole field.

- Devine was a really good running back.
- Stan and JD were really good on the boundary
- Mo Washington was dangerous as hell in the passing game, and his presence alone forced defenses to change the way they defended Nebraska.


1. The first read on every pass play in this offense is the Vertical Route on the perimeter. If Nebraska has big play receivers who can stretch the field, this forces the defense to keep their safeties back and makes the corners almost irrelevant in run support. Suddenly, the running game is often defended by 7 instead of 11.

2. When you have legit boundary receivers, this forces the linebackers and/or the nickel to become over exposed in coverage of the Slot/ a RB/ and/or the TE.

3. If there is a legit "take it to the house" playmaker at RB in the passing game, like Mo and even Devine to an extent, this creates serious mismatches at the backer spot and forces the back 7 to defend every inch of the field vertically and horizontally.


So what happened to Nebraska's offense? Many of fans, who lack a conceptual understanding of football, blame Adrian Martinez for the struggles.

In reality, this is Scott Frost's fault for failing to sign difference makers at the skill positions.

Nebraska went from Stan Morgan, JD Spielman, Mo Washington, Jack Stoll, and Devine Ozigbo at the end of 2018, to Levi Falck, Kade Warner, Wyatt Liewer, Wandale, and Ronald Thompkins by week two of 2020.

That's on Scott Frost.

He never should've let Nebraska get to that situation from a skill talent standpoint. Part of that is on Walters, sure, but he should've been all over an elite WR recruiter by the time he arrived.

Secondly, Frost needs to learn to coach to his personnel. Its maddening to see Nebraska try and run the same offense with dramatically less talent. Don't try to throw the football 35 times when Kade Warner is your #1 option on the boundary.



These are many of the reasons why I will defend Adrian Martinez to the hilt. Its also why I laugh, like honestly mockingly belly laugh, at posters over here that think Nebraska could've done better in the transfer portal.

- There are 67 Power Five Football programs in College Football. When Nebraska started Falck, Warner, and Robinson the first 3 weeks of 2020, Nebraska ranked roughly 60th in overall receiver talent out of the Power 5.




Now... back to WV's initial point:

Adrian's fumbles are too many, and usually the result of trying to extend plays in traffic where he leaves his feet. His interception numbers are actually well below the average INT# of a D1 starting QB.

He's averaging an 1 Interception every 38 attempts.

Tommy Armstrong had 1 INT for every 26 passes.

Taylor Martinez had 1 INT for every 33 passes

Tanner Lee was 1 for every 26

Zac Lee had 1 INT for every 32 attempts

Joe Ganz wad 1 INT for every 32 attempts



Zac Taylor is the only QB with a better INT ratio of 1 INT for every 41 attempts.

Joe Dailey had an 1 INT for every 16 attempts -- YIKES


annnnnd for all that explanation of why Martinez is sooooo much better than his predecessors... he won only 4 games in 2018. Before you ask, I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.
 
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stucknks

Athletic Director
Jan 2, 2012
13,407
8,367
113
His lack of leadership and mental mistakes that continue to happen as a 3 year starter might have contributed to the fact that we have only won 5 out of our last 16 games played. THAT is not cool.
I don't like people coming here dogging my #1 team and QB.
 

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