NO,NO,NO!!!!!!!!!!!

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
That is all Moscow Mitch and the walking zombies New Republicans will do on any bill, even if it is great for the country. These Fellow Republicans are like Mitch's well trained lap dogs. We have some bipatisian bills out there but Mitch the bitch wants nothing passed. He wants to show Biden got nothing done. It is obvious what the Republicans are doing and in 2022 it time to vote the stubborn Pubes out of office so we can actually do what is right for the country and the people. People can see the crap going on and the Zombies will be voted out. Enough is enough!!!!!!!!
 

Jaemekon

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Apr 23, 2007
5,290
5,071
113


mcconnell-12319.jpg
 

Bobfather

Athletic Director
Gold Member
Oct 6, 2002
14,585
7,494
113
50
That is all Moscow Mitch and the walking zombies New Republicans will do on any bill, even if it is great for the country. These Fellow Republicans are like Mitch's well trained lap dogs. We have some bipatisian bills out there but Mitch the bitch wants nothing passed. He wants to show Biden got nothing done. It is obvious what the Republicans are doing and in 2022 it time to vote the stubborn Pubes out of office so we can actually do what is right for the country and the people. People can see the crap going on and the Zombies will be voted out. Enough is enough!!!!!!!!
You communist are going down in 22 as we are retaking the House and Senate and the 1st things that will be done are impeaching Bidophile and the witch Kamala!
 

EriktheRed

Offensive Coordinator
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2001
8,256
7,047
113
That is all Moscow Mitch and the walking zombies New Republicans will do on any bill, even if it is great for the country. These Fellow Republicans are like Mitch's well trained lap dogs. We have some bipatisian bills out there but Mitch the bitch wants nothing passed. He wants to show Biden got nothing done. It is obvious what the Republicans are doing and in 2022 it time to vote the stubborn Pubes out of office so we can actually do what is right for the country and the people. People can see the crap going on and the Zombies will be voted out. Enough is enough!!!!!!!!
The Linclown Project seems to have demoralized you greatly. Hang in there. Those tears will wash away in a few years.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Soda Popinski

cavalot

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2003
12,619
9,296
113
That is all Moscow Mitch and the walking zombies New Republicans will do on any bill, even if it is great for the country. These Fellow Republicans are like Mitch's well trained lap dogs. We have some bipatisian bills out there but Mitch the bitch wants nothing passed. He wants to show Biden got nothing done. It is obvious what the Republicans are doing and in 2022 it time to vote the stubborn Pubes out of office so we can actually do what is right for the country and the people. People can see the crap going on and the Zombies will be voted out. Enough is enough!!!!!!!!
Its the reason I left the party in the first place during the Obama admin. The continued craziness has just solidified my decision.

F'n pathetic.
 

mhosek

Sophomore
Gold Member
Dec 11, 2001
1,294
1,031
113
That is all Moscow Mitch and the walking zombies New Republicans will do on any bill, even if it is great for the country. These Fellow Republicans are like Mitch's well trained lap dogs. We have some bipatisian bills out there but Mitch the bitch wants nothing passed. He wants to show Biden got nothing done. It is obvious what the Republicans are doing and in 2022 it time to vote the stubborn Pubes out of office so we can actually do what is right for the country and the people. People can see the crap going on and the Zombies will be voted out. Enough is enough!!!!!!!!
Ummmm… hypocritical much? You wanna praise Pelosi’s bipartisanship? I mean y’all wrote the textbook on this… gridlock’s the only thing that can save us at this point, lol.
 

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
Ummmm… hypocritical much? You wanna praise Pelosi’s bipartisanship? I mean y’all wrote the textbook on this… gridlock’s the only thing that can save us at this point, lol.
Wake up the new Republican are destroying this country and you are supporting them. Shame on You!
 

mhosek

Sophomore
Gold Member
Dec 11, 2001
1,294
1,031
113
Wake up the new Republican are destroying this country and you are supporting them. Shame on You!
Depends on what you want the country to look like, I guess. Not a republican, either, but if you want an lame extension of Western European quasi-socialism, you support this admin. If you still believe in capitalism and free market economy, you’re praying for gridlock and to limit the damage…
 

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
You communist are going down in 22 as we are retaking the House and Senate and the 1st things that will be done are impeaching Bidophile and the witch Kamala!
You are a mental midget. You are in fantasy land. These new Republican will give away any chance of success. People are getting tired of the BS lies from the Pubes.
 

mhosek

Sophomore
Gold Member
Dec 11, 2001
1,294
1,031
113
You are a mental midget. You are in fantasy land. These new Republican will give away any chance of success. People are getting tired of the BS lies from the Pubes.
CRT vs a fair and unclouded educator, ‘gender fluidity’ vs science, universal lockdowns vs common sense… yeah I like this admin vs…. Anything else.
 

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
CRT vs a fair and unclouded educator, ‘gender fluidity’ vs science, universal lockdowns vs common sense… yeah I like this admin vs…. Anything else.
More made-up shit that makes you guys look like fools. Try not to look foolish, would you?
 

thecatindahat

Assistant Head Coach
Gold Member
Dec 4, 2004
10,499
8,858
113
Fort Collins
That is all Moscow Mitch and the walking zombies New Republicans will do on any bill, even if it is great for the country. These Fellow Republicans are like Mitch's well trained lap dogs. We have some bipatisian bills out there but Mitch the bitch wants nothing passed. He wants to show Biden got nothing done. It is obvious what the Republicans are doing and in 2022 it time to vote the stubborn Pubes out of office so we can actually do what is right for the country and the people. People can see the crap going on and the Zombies will be voted out. Enough is enough!!!!!!!!
So when it doesn't go your way it's bad, but when the Dems do it it's okay. Got you....
 

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
So when it doesn't go your way it's bad, but when the Dems do it it's okay. Got you....
When a party completely shuts down the government improvement progress, and constantly lies then that party needs to be called out. The Dems do crap that is not right also but they are actually trying to improve things. I can not be part of a party until things get back to reality and not this crazy crap.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Bobfather and lipem

Jaemekon

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Apr 23, 2007
5,290
5,071
113
Bitch face Mitch. Nobody defends the bitch. Is this the rupublican equivalent to AOC?

 
  • Like
Reactions: nelsonj22

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
Ruining the country by making is not drastically change. Ok there fella keep on with that. Makes a lot of sense RollingLaugh
That's the problem, you don't see what is really going on. I wish the Republicans in congress would quit telling lies and start telling the truth before they lose even more membership.
 

EriktheRed

Offensive Coordinator
Gold Member
Jul 1, 2001
8,256
7,047
113
That's the problem, you don't see what is really going on. I wish the Republicans in congress would quit telling lies and start telling the truth before they lose even more membership.
You clearly didn't pay attention to the switches in the House. It went the opposite way than what you are describing. VA is all of the sudden turning more red, which I didn't think was possible. Trump lost by 10% and recent polls have the Governors race at 4% for the Dem.
 

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
Depends on what you want the country to look like, I guess. Not a republican, either, but if you want an lame extension of Western European quasi-socialism, you support this admin. If you still believe in capitalism and free market economy, you’re praying for gridlock and to limit the damage…
What I am saying is the Republicans better get off their asses and have some input into these bills or the Dems are going to ram some crap through that is not in our best interest. Setting on their hands is not the answer.
 

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
You clearly didn't pay attention to the switches in the House. It went the opposite way than what you are describing. VA is all of the sudden turning more red, which I didn't think was possible. Trump lost by 10% and recent polls have the Governors race at 4% for the Dem.
So you are saying you want the new Republicans to continue to lie , to continue to say crazy crap, to continue to block bills going through congress. You support dirty politics.
 

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
GOP kills Manchin bipartisan voting bill that he struck with Republicans. Mitch does it again, the bill gave the Republicans voter id's as part of the compromise. You give the Republicans most of what they want and they still say NO!
 

mhosek

Sophomore
Gold Member
Dec 11, 2001
1,294
1,031
113
What I am saying is the Republicans better get off their asses and have some input into these bills or the Dems are going to ram some crap through that is not in our best interest. Setting on their hands is not the answer.
Taste of your own medicine, mon frere… if you’re trying to intimate that the Left is the party of ‘bipartisanship’, even Cuntmala would laugh at that…
 
  • Like
Reactions: Soda Popinski

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
Taste of your own medicine, mon frere… if you’re trying to intimate that the Left is the party of ‘bipartisanship’, even Cuntmala would laugh at that…
What I am saying is we are going to get all Dem ideas on the bills thanks to Mitch"s stubbornness.
 

capt'n caveman

Offensive Coordinator
Gold Member
Aug 1, 2007
8,992
6,827
113
They are the party of obstructionist. They did the same thing to obama.... and then had the nerve to say he didn't accomplish anything. I wish the dems had the balls to just go ahead and do it anyway.... like the pubs do. The right wants nothing to do with bipartisanship, and I wish the left would just tell them to f off and pass legislation anyway.
 

cavalot

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2003
12,619
9,296
113
In the Democrats’ Spanish-language response to President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address, U.S. Rep. Veronica Escobar of El Paso said the president and his allies are “the biggest threat to our safety and security” because they are “unwilling to take action for our country, acting solely in their own interest.”

She went on to highlight the actions of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

“Mitch McConnell, the leader of the Senate, is openly stonewalling legislation that would help improve the lives of veterans, women, and families – all of us,” Escobar said, according to an English language translation of her remarks provided by her office. “House Democrats have passed more than 275 bipartisan bills this Congress, but these bills are gathering dust on his desk.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmar, who delivered the Democratic Party’s response in English after the State of the Union, cited similar figures when discussing McConnell’s actions: “Those three bills, and more than 275 other bipartisan bills, are just gathering dust on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s desk.”

The New York Times called Whitmar’s claim “exaggerated,” based on an analysis from Factcheck.org of a statement from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi making the same claim.

Escobar’s office shared a list of 291 “bipartisan” bills that were approved by the House since the beginning of 2019 but are awaiting action in the Senate, as of Jan. 24. Let’s dive in.



No universal definition of ‘bipartisan’

Elizabeth Lopez-Sandoval, spokeswoman for Escobar, said Escobar considered bills as being bipartisan if there was “at least one Republican vote on the House floor,” or if the bill was passed by a voice vote and “has at least one Republican cosponsor.”

Sources​

Emailed press release, Democratic Response to President Trump’s State of the Union Delivered by Texas Congresswoman Veronica Escobar, Feb. 4, 2020
Factcheck.org, Pelosi’s Bipartisanship Boast, Dec. 17, 2019
C-SPAN, Democratic Spanish Language Response to State of the Union, Feb. 4, 2020
Email interview with Elizabeth Lopez-Sandoval, Feb. 6, 2020
El Paso Times, Congresswoman Veronica Escobar’s State of the Union rebuttal to be delivered from El Paso, Feb. 3, 2020
New York Times, Fact-Checking Trump’s 2020 State of the Union Address and the Democratic Response, Feb. 5, 2020
U.S. House of Representatives, House Practice, 2017
Email interview, Kirby Goidel, director of the Public Policy Research Institution at Texas A&M University, Feb. 11, 2020
Email interview with Sean Theriault, government professor at the University of Texas at Austin, Feb. 11, 2020
Phone interview with Jordan Tama, associate professor of international service at American University, Feb. 11, 2020
Phone interview with Laura Blessing, senior fellow at Georgetown University’s Government Affairs Institute, Feb. 12, 2020
“Bills that passed on voice vote but do not have at least one Republican cosponsor were excluded,” she said.

While there is no singular definition of what constitutes a bipartisan bill, the four political experts we consulted for this piece generally agreed that Escobar used a low bar by which to judge cooperation between political parties.

Kirby Goidel, director of the Public Policy Research Institute at Texas A&M University, said the term “bipartisan” has taken on a looser definition in regular usage because it is “advantageous in terms of public support.”

“It is not unusual to call a bill bipartisan when it only received a single vote from across the aisle, though that runs against our more general understanding of what the term is intended to mean,” he said in an email. “It is also easy to imagine individual representatives more willing to compromise because they are Republican representing a Democratic district (or vice versa), so adding one member of the opposition in that context wouldn’t strike anyone as ‘bipartisan’.”

As an example, he added: ”(U.S. Sen. Mitt) Romney’s vote didn’t make the vote for impeachment bipartisan.”

Goidel said a better definition for bipartisan would be legislation that has “majority support from both parties.”

“Though ideally we wouldn’t include resolutions or other items that generate little or no opposition, because the term also implies that the parties worked together to compromise on an important and potentially controversial issue,” he said.


For the purposes of this fact-check, we’ll rely on counting the votes, since it is tricky to gauge how much collaboration went into each proposal behind the scenes.

Jordan Tama, associate professor at American University who is writing a book about bipartisanship, said it is “less common” to see a truly bipartisan process in today’s Congress, since members tend to develop legislation within their own party and only look to attract support from the other party after the fact.

“It is more common to see bipartisanship reflected in voting outcomes, even though in many of these cases the legislation wasn’t developed in a very bipartisan method,” Tama said. “You can still call something bipartisan if the votes show support from both parties, even if it wasn’t developed through a highly collaborative process.”

Members of both parties tend to make claims about bipartisanship based on support from one member of the other party, according to Laura Blessing, senior fellow at Georgetown University’s Government Affairs Institute.

“Everybody does this,” she said. “This is strategic messaging to a larger audience about the nature of legislation and values of main sponsors in reaching across the aisle, but that doesn’t mean it is a meaningless standard.

“There is a spectrum about how we think of measures of bipartisanship, and if these people want to use this, well, people have done this before and they’ll do it again. It is a reasonable standard, but there are higher ones out there.”

Adding up the numbers


When a bill comes before the full House, there are two primary ways the legislative body votes: a roll call vote or a voice vote.

In a roll call vote, the names of each legislator are read aloud and their vote is recorded alongside their name.

When the body passes a measure in a voice vote, members call out “aye” or “nay” on the question of passage and the presiding officer decides which side prevailed. If there is a dispute over the decision, members stand to get an exact tally of the vote.

Of the 291 bills Escobar’s team marked as bipartisan, 116 passed in a roll call vote and 175 passed by a voice vote.

Before we get into the votes, here’s a reminder about the party breakdown in the House. There are 232 Democrats, 197 Republicans and one independent. Five seats are vacant.

Let’s start with the 116 roll call votes: 71 passed with the support of a majority of Republican members of the House, ranging from 100 votes to 196 votes. Seven bills passed with anywhere from 55 to 93 GOP votes, and 38 passed with fewer than 50 Republican votes — 23 of which passed with fewer than 10 Republican votes.

Escobar’s team flagged 175 bills that passed via a voice vote and have at least one Republican co-sponsor. Of those, 63 have Republican sponsors, meaning a Republican introduced the bill, and at least one Democrat as a co-sponsor.


Looking at the 112 bills with a Democrat as the sponsor, five have more than 50 Republican co-sponsors and the rest have 32 or fewer Republican co-sponsors. Of those, 95 have fewer than 10 Republican co-sponsors.

Tama said he didn’t think it was worth it to split hairs over sponsorships on bills that passed by a voice vote, since that generally indicates that there is support for the bill from both parties.

“You can really only use (a voice vote) when the vast majority of members are going to vote for it,” he said. “If you imagine a vote where two parties are polarized, you’d have almost as many voting yes and no — you wouldn’t be able to judge the outcome. I think it is safe to say that all of the voice votes involved bipartisan support, even if we can’t know for sure what the result is.”

Overall, the experts we consulted agreed that, given the various definitions of bipartisan, Escobar’s claim was largely accurate but could use more clarifying details.

Sean Theriault, a government professor at the University of Texas, said her use of the term bipartisan is fair.

“It’s certainly not telling the whole truth, but a single vote from the other side does indicate that it enjoys support from both parties,” he said in an email. “So, of course, we would prefer Escobar to say, ’275 bills that have received at least support from one Republican are sitting on McConnell’s desk,′ but calling them ‘bipartisan’ is not wrong.”

Our ruling



Escobar said: “House Democrats have passed more than 275 bipartisan bills this Congress.”

Escobar counted bills as bipartisan if they had at least one Republican vote in favor or at least one Republican co-sponsor. Political experts said that her measurement is not inaccurate, but it doesn’t conform to a general understanding of the term.

Using the higher bar for measuring bipartisan legislation offered by these experts — support from a majority of members of both parties — plus counting legislation that passed on a voice vote, the total comes to 251 bills, which is close to Escobar’s claim.

Overall, her statement needs clarification. We rate it Mostly True.
 

mhosek

Sophomore
Gold Member
Dec 11, 2001
1,294
1,031
113
In the Democrats’ Spanish-language response to President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address, U.S. Rep. Veronica Escobar of El Paso said the president and his allies are “the biggest threat to our safety and security” because they are “unwilling to take action for our country, acting solely in their own interest.”

She went on to highlight the actions of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

“Mitch McConnell, the leader of the Senate, is openly stonewalling legislation that would help improve the lives of veterans, women, and families – all of us,” Escobar said, according to an English language translation of her remarks provided by her office. “House Democrats have passed more than 275 bipartisan bills this Congress, but these bills are gathering dust on his desk.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmar, who delivered the Democratic Party’s response in English after the State of the Union, cited similar figures when discussing McConnell’s actions: “Those three bills, and more than 275 other bipartisan bills, are just gathering dust on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s desk.”

The New York Times called Whitmar’s claim “exaggerated,” based on an analysis from Factcheck.org of a statement from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi making the same claim.

Escobar’s office shared a list of 291 “bipartisan” bills that were approved by the House since the beginning of 2019 but are awaiting action in the Senate, as of Jan. 24. Let’s dive in.



No universal definition of ‘bipartisan’

Elizabeth Lopez-Sandoval, spokeswoman for Escobar, said Escobar considered bills as being bipartisan if there was “at least one Republican vote on the House floor,” or if the bill was passed by a voice vote and “has at least one Republican cosponsor.”

Sources​

Emailed press release, Democratic Response to President Trump’s State of the Union Delivered by Texas Congresswoman Veronica Escobar, Feb. 4, 2020
Factcheck.org, Pelosi’s Bipartisanship Boast, Dec. 17, 2019
C-SPAN, Democratic Spanish Language Response to State of the Union, Feb. 4, 2020
Email interview with Elizabeth Lopez-Sandoval, Feb. 6, 2020
El Paso Times, Congresswoman Veronica Escobar’s State of the Union rebuttal to be delivered from El Paso, Feb. 3, 2020
New York Times, Fact-Checking Trump’s 2020 State of the Union Address and the Democratic Response, Feb. 5, 2020
U.S. House of Representatives, House Practice, 2017
Email interview, Kirby Goidel, director of the Public Policy Research Institution at Texas A&M University, Feb. 11, 2020
Email interview with Sean Theriault, government professor at the University of Texas at Austin, Feb. 11, 2020
Phone interview with Jordan Tama, associate professor of international service at American University, Feb. 11, 2020
Phone interview with Laura Blessing, senior fellow at Georgetown University’s Government Affairs Institute, Feb. 12, 2020
“Bills that passed on voice vote but do not have at least one Republican cosponsor were excluded,” she said.

While there is no singular definition of what constitutes a bipartisan bill, the four political experts we consulted for this piece generally agreed that Escobar used a low bar by which to judge cooperation between political parties.

Kirby Goidel, director of the Public Policy Research Institute at Texas A&M University, said the term “bipartisan” has taken on a looser definition in regular usage because it is “advantageous in terms of public support.”

“It is not unusual to call a bill bipartisan when it only received a single vote from across the aisle, though that runs against our more general understanding of what the term is intended to mean,” he said in an email. “It is also easy to imagine individual representatives more willing to compromise because they are Republican representing a Democratic district (or vice versa), so adding one member of the opposition in that context wouldn’t strike anyone as ‘bipartisan’.”

As an example, he added: ”(U.S. Sen. Mitt) Romney’s vote didn’t make the vote for impeachment bipartisan.”

Goidel said a better definition for bipartisan would be legislation that has “majority support from both parties.”

“Though ideally we wouldn’t include resolutions or other items that generate little or no opposition, because the term also implies that the parties worked together to compromise on an important and potentially controversial issue,” he said.


For the purposes of this fact-check, we’ll rely on counting the votes, since it is tricky to gauge how much collaboration went into each proposal behind the scenes.

Jordan Tama, associate professor at American University who is writing a book about bipartisanship, said it is “less common” to see a truly bipartisan process in today’s Congress, since members tend to develop legislation within their own party and only look to attract support from the other party after the fact.

“It is more common to see bipartisanship reflected in voting outcomes, even though in many of these cases the legislation wasn’t developed in a very bipartisan method,” Tama said. “You can still call something bipartisan if the votes show support from both parties, even if it wasn’t developed through a highly collaborative process.”

Members of both parties tend to make claims about bipartisanship based on support from one member of the other party, according to Laura Blessing, senior fellow at Georgetown University’s Government Affairs Institute.

“Everybody does this,” she said. “This is strategic messaging to a larger audience about the nature of legislation and values of main sponsors in reaching across the aisle, but that doesn’t mean it is a meaningless standard.

“There is a spectrum about how we think of measures of bipartisanship, and if these people want to use this, well, people have done this before and they’ll do it again. It is a reasonable standard, but there are higher ones out there.”

Adding up the numbers


When a bill comes before the full House, there are two primary ways the legislative body votes: a roll call vote or a voice vote.

In a roll call vote, the names of each legislator are read aloud and their vote is recorded alongside their name.

When the body passes a measure in a voice vote, members call out “aye” or “nay” on the question of passage and the presiding officer decides which side prevailed. If there is a dispute over the decision, members stand to get an exact tally of the vote.

Of the 291 bills Escobar’s team marked as bipartisan, 116 passed in a roll call vote and 175 passed by a voice vote.

Before we get into the votes, here’s a reminder about the party breakdown in the House. There are 232 Democrats, 197 Republicans and one independent. Five seats are vacant.

Let’s start with the 116 roll call votes: 71 passed with the support of a majority of Republican members of the House, ranging from 100 votes to 196 votes. Seven bills passed with anywhere from 55 to 93 GOP votes, and 38 passed with fewer than 50 Republican votes — 23 of which passed with fewer than 10 Republican votes.

Escobar’s team flagged 175 bills that passed via a voice vote and have at least one Republican co-sponsor. Of those, 63 have Republican sponsors, meaning a Republican introduced the bill, and at least one Democrat as a co-sponsor.


Looking at the 112 bills with a Democrat as the sponsor, five have more than 50 Republican co-sponsors and the rest have 32 or fewer Republican co-sponsors. Of those, 95 have fewer than 10 Republican co-sponsors.

Tama said he didn’t think it was worth it to split hairs over sponsorships on bills that passed by a voice vote, since that generally indicates that there is support for the bill from both parties.

“You can really only use (a voice vote) when the vast majority of members are going to vote for it,” he said. “If you imagine a vote where two parties are polarized, you’d have almost as many voting yes and no — you wouldn’t be able to judge the outcome. I think it is safe to say that all of the voice votes involved bipartisan support, even if we can’t know for sure what the result is.”

Overall, the experts we consulted agreed that, given the various definitions of bipartisan, Escobar’s claim was largely accurate but could use more clarifying details.

Sean Theriault, a government professor at the University of Texas, said her use of the term bipartisan is fair.

“It’s certainly not telling the whole truth, but a single vote from the other side does indicate that it enjoys support from both parties,” he said in an email. “So, of course, we would prefer Escobar to say, ’275 bills that have received at least support from one Republican are sitting on McConnell’s desk,′ but calling them ‘bipartisan’ is not wrong.”

Our ruling



Escobar said: “House Democrats have passed more than 275 bipartisan bills this Congress.”

Escobar counted bills as bipartisan if they had at least one Republican vote in favor or at least one Republican co-sponsor. Political experts said that her measurement is not inaccurate, but it doesn’t conform to a general understanding of the term.

Using the higher bar for measuring bipartisan legislation offered by these experts — support from a majority of members of both parties — plus counting legislation that passed on a voice vote, the total comes to 251 bills, which is close to Escobar’s claim.

Overall, her statement needs clarification. We rate it Mostly True.
That was special. Any (ANY) non-leftist should rightly block the socialist agenda at each and every turn. Not a big fan of McConnell or any of the Rino’s frankly, but I do legitimately hope they do whatever they can to minimize the damage of the next few years. This administration is a runaway train going downhill currently.
 

kidofSN

Junior
Gold Member
Jul 4, 2007
1,773
2,219
113
Some of you really do live in an alternate reality. It is almost scary!
 

Jaemekon

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Apr 23, 2007
5,290
5,071
113
I'm not a republican, but the chances of Biden getting impeached are less than TO returning to coach Kansas.

Right, we saw our pathetic government try to do it to trump. And with everything they say about him, you would think it would be no problem. But no, our politicians are weak, and...

 
  • Like
Reactions: nelsonj22

nelsonj22

Nebraska Football Hall of Fame
Gold Member
Sep 27, 2014
19,288
20,283
113
Right, we saw our pathetic government try to do it to trump. And with everything they say about him, you would think it would be no problem. But no, our politicians are weak, and...

I love how it went from "no it wasn't Trump it was antifa so no impeachment" to 5 months later saying "it was a peaceful protest" 😂
 

Bobfather

Athletic Director
Gold Member
Oct 6, 2002
14,585
7,494
113
50
They are the party of obstructionist. They did the same thing to obama.... and then had the nerve to say he didn't accomplish anything. I wish the dems had the balls to just go ahead and do it anyway.... like the pubs do. The right wants nothing to do with bipartisanship, and I wish the left would just tell them to f off and pass legislation anyway.
No we are the party of America who won’t just bend over for the communism you traitors are trying to shove down our throats!
 
  • Haha
Reactions: cavalot

Redblooded

Athletic Director
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
16,252
8,198
113
No we are the party of America who won’t just bend over for the communism you traitors are trying to shove down our throats!
Bob you are bending over for the radical right crazies. Hope you enjoy making a fool out of yourself in your alternate world. Fantasy land never looked so bad.
 

auski

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
May 29, 2001
5,730
6,267
113
That is all Moscow Mitch and the walking zombies New Republicans will do on any bill, even if it is great for the country. These Fellow Republicans are like Mitch's well trained lap dogs. We have some bipatisian bills out there but Mitch the bitch wants nothing passed. He wants to show Biden got nothing done. It is obvious what the Republicans are doing and in 2022 it time to vote the stubborn Pubes out of office so we can actually do what is right for the country and the people. People can see the crap going on and the Zombies will be voted out. Enough is enough!!!!!!!!
What?
 

Latest posts