Nadab Joseph about to make his choice...link inside

TruHusker

Offensive Coordinator
Sep 21, 2001
8,606
2,966
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NCAA Eligibility requirements
  • Academic Requirements – Complete 16 core courses, have a minimum GPA of 2.3 (for DI) or 2.2 (for DII) in those core courses, and meet the minimums of the sliding scale in your combination of core course GPA and SAT/ACT test scores.
The overall GPA is NOT what the NCAA looks at.. It is the core GPA that must be obtained at the end of the Junior year. Those classes taken up through the Junior year are locked into the GPA so taking a math class over as a Senior that was low as a freshman doesn't eliminate the lower grade.

It is all based on a sliding scale so to say a 19 ACT is all that is required is misleading. With a 19 ACT the student/athlete would then need a much higher GPA. Also, in reverse, a higher ACT doesn't require as high of a GPA.

This piece from the web: https://www.ncsasports.org/

When you are trying to determine the GPA or SAT/ACT test scores you need to be NCAA eligible, you must reference the NCAA sliding scale. The sliding scale is designed so that if you have a higher GPA, you can have lower SAT/ACT scores. If you have really strong test scores, you can have a lower GPA.

Insider Tip: The NCAA uses the “core course GPA.” This is different than the GPA on your high school transcripts. Each year, a small group of student-athletes will assume that because they are on track to graduate high school, they are on track to be NCAA eligible, but they are different things.
Go here to calculate your core course GPA.
 

huskerssalts

Recruiting Coordinator
Oct 6, 2014
6,693
6,348
113
40
Beatrice Nebraska
NCAA Eligibility requirements
  • Academic Requirements – Complete 16 core courses, have a minimum GPA of 2.3 (for DI) or 2.2 (for DII) in those core courses, and meet the minimums of the sliding scale in your combination of core course GPA and SAT/ACT test scores.
The overall GPA is NOT what the NCAA looks at.. It is the core GPA that must be obtained at the end of the Junior year. Those classes taken up through the Junior year are locked into the GPA so taking a math class over as a Senior that was low as a freshman doesn't eliminate the lower grade.

It is all based on a sliding scale so to say a 19 ACT is all that is required is misleading. With a 19 ACT the student/athlete would then need a much higher GPA. Also, in reverse, a higher ACT doesn't require as high of a GPA.

This piece from the web: https://www.ncsasports.org/

When you are trying to determine the GPA or SAT/ACT test scores you need to be NCAA eligible, you must reference the NCAA sliding scale. The sliding scale is designed so that if you have a higher GPA, you can have lower SAT/ACT scores. If you have really strong test scores, you can have a lower GPA.

Insider Tip: The NCAA uses the “core course GPA.” This is different than the GPA on your high school transcripts. Each year, a small group of student-athletes will assume that because they are on track to graduate high school, they are on track to be NCAA eligible, but they are different things.
Go here to calculate your core course GPA.
This right here is probably what is holding him back on making his decision public yet (or till Friday). My guess is he’s waiting for everything to clear and he knows everything is golden. Thats is pure speculation but makes sense.
 
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huskerssalts

Recruiting Coordinator
Oct 6, 2014
6,693
6,348
113
40
Beatrice Nebraska
Today is the day for Mr Nadab Joseph. I’m not sure if that’s 7 pm central or what? Either way, Hopefully we add the young man to our roster and continue to built up our talent levels. Fingers crossed.
 
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Dean Pope

Offensive Coordinator
Oct 11, 2001
8,761
1,671
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Has he qualified?
I think people in the know are too nice to say it, but they've hinted at the reason he qualified has to do with the NCAA cutting kids some slack due to the pandemic. The fact that he's been at a juco for two years, played only one of those seasons, and is just now getting eligible should tell you something about his academic progress.

This staff has gambled and lost on a few of these high risk kids like Washington and that big juco lineman who never qualified. They are due to hit on one. Right?
 

TruHusker

Offensive Coordinator
Sep 21, 2001
8,606
2,966
113
I think people in the know are too nice to say it, but they've hinted at the reason he qualified has to do with the NCAA cutting kids some slack due to the pandemic. The fact that he's been at a juco for two years, played only one of those seasons, and is just now getting eligible should tell you something about his academic progress.

This staff has gambled and lost on a few of these high risk kids like Washington and that big juco lineman who never qualified. They are due to hit on one. Right?
Depends on if he was originally a Qualifier or Non Qualifier. There are different rules for each. He was at Independence for two years so he could conceivably have earned his AA degree and meet the transfer credit requirements. I could easily be incorrect but I believe the only thing the NCAA has waived is the qualifying ACT/SAT test scores. I don't believe the NCAA is going to be making individual decisions, they have to stick to their guidelines and eligibility rules or they would have a huge mess on their hands.

"Assuming" a Non Qualifier, the following would apply. There are always caveats.
Generally, a non-qualifier is a student athlete who is attempting to transfer before completing their general education/associates degree. In Division I, if you are transferring from a two-year college and have never been certified as a final academic qualifier, the requirements to compete, practice, and receive an athletic scholarship in your first year are:

  • Attend the two-year college full-time for at least three semesters or four quarters;
  • Achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.000;
  • Graduate from the two-year college; and
  • Have at least 48 transferable credit hours at a semester school or 72 transferable credit hours at a quarter school, including six semester hours or eight quarter hours of English and three semester hours or four quarter hours of math.
 
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