My Covid Story

Antwill

Blackshirt
Dec 18, 2004
3,318
1,795
113
Someone very dear to me died with Covid-19 on Friday.

Any of you who have read my posts on here probably know my thoughts on Covid and all the lockdowns and mandates that have been used to try to stop the spread. If you don’t, I’ll summarize: I thought that all of the lockdowns, mask mandates, school closures, sports cancellations, quarantines, and everything else has been a huge mistake and are doing little to nothing to save lives. As a matter-of-fact, I thought that there was a growing body of evidence that shows that the measures being employed to stop Covid have and will take way more life years than they will save due to lost jobs, isolation, etc. etc. Now that I have lost a loved one, I’m even more convinced of my previous position.

You see, my loved one and his wife did everything they were supposed to do. They masked up whenever they went out. They stopped going to church, didn’t see kids and grandkids nearly as much as they usually did, and almost completely stopped seeing friends. They stopped going to the grocery store and running errands like they had always done. In short, he and his wife almost completely isolated themselves. Nevertheless, they both got the virus.

For her, it was not much more than a cold with a low-grade fever for about 10 days. For him it was obviously much more serious. He had a couple of serious underlying conditions and was 81, but both my wife and I noticed how much he regressed from the beginning of the pandemic up to the time he contracted the virus. Was that due to the underlying conditions he was dealing with? Maybe. But both of us think that the isolation had a lot to do with his decline. He was the type of man who relished in his family, especially his grandkids. They were the apple of his eye and he would go to as many of their events as possible. He lit up talking to them and was so proud of each and every one of the 18 that he had.

If he hadn’t had to isolate and would have continued to have those human interactions that were so important to him, would it have made a difference? If he maintained those connections, would his health have remained good enough that he would have been able to fight off the virus when he got it? Had he not isolated, would he have contracted the virus earlier before his health declined and been able to fight it off? Although he did not go out often, did the mask he always wore give him a false sense of safety that it didn’t actually provide that led to him contracting the virus? We’ll never know.

What we do know is that he did miss out on a lot of things he loved in what came to be the last six months of his life. We know that he did everything that he was supposed to do according to the experts and still ended up catching the virus and dying. We know that he spent the last two weeks of his life in a hospital where his family couldn’t come and visit him. By the grace of God, we were able to get the hospital to allow a priest to come and give him the Sacrament of the sick and allow his wife to be with him at the end. The only reason they allowed her in is because she had had Covid, recovered, and was out of her quarantine. If that had not been the case, he would have died alone. I shudder to think how much more difficult this would be if those two things had not been allowed to happen. I feel anger and pain for all the patients and their families who were not allowed to be together when the end came. That is a grave injustice.

In the end, our days are numbered by our God. That doesn’t mean that we should live recklessly and tempt fate, but it also doesn’t mean we should sacrifice living life under the false notion that we can control everything, even death. So, we will soon bury a good man who lived a good life. However, I can’t help but wonder if he had the last 6 months to live again, he wouldn’t have made different choices.
 
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Crazyhole

Junior
Jun 4, 2004
1,991
2,845
113
This really breaks my heart. I'm very sorry for you loss but more sorry for the way he had to spend his last few months.
 
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Lars72

Senior
Nov 27, 2007
2,316
347
83
I am so sorry to hear this. My prayers go out to all of you. Please give me a call if you need anything.
 
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bingo65

Redshirt Freshman
Jun 18, 2020
532
380
63
Someone very dear to me died with Covid-19 on Friday.

Any of you who have read my posts on here probably know my thoughts on Covid and all the lockdowns and mandates that have been used to try to stop the spread. If you don’t, I’ll summarize: I thought that all of the lockdowns, mask mandates, school closures, sports cancellations, quarantines, and everything else has been a huge mistake and are doing little to nothing to save lives. As a matter-of-fact, I thought that there was a growing body of evidence that shows that the measures being employed to stop Covid have and will take way more life years than they will save due to lost jobs, isolation, etc. etc. Now that I have lost a loved one, I’m even more convinced of my previous position.

You see, my loved one and his wife did everything they were supposed to do. They masked up whenever they went out. They stopped going to church, didn’t see kids and grandkids nearly as much as they usually did, and almost completely stopped seeing friends. They stopped going to the grocery store and running errands like they had always done. In short, he and his wife almost completely isolated themselves. Nevertheless, they both got the virus.

For her, it was not much more than a cold with a low-grade fever for about 10 days. For him it was obviously much more serious. He had a couple of serious underlying conditions and was 81, but both my wife and I noticed how much he regressed from the beginning of the pandemic up to the time he contracted the virus. Was that due to the underlying conditions he was dealing with? Maybe. But both of us think that the isolation had a lot to do with his decline. He was the type of man who relished in his family, especially his grandkids. They were the apple of his eye and he would go to as many of their events as possible. He lit up talking to them and was so proud of each and every one of the 18 that he had.

If he hadn’t had to isolate and would have continued to have those human interactions that were so important to him, would it have made a difference? If he maintained those connections, would his health have remained good enough that he would have been able to fight off the virus when he got it? Had he not isolated, would he have contracted the virus earlier before his health declined and been able to fight it off? Although he did not go out often, did the mask he always wore give him a false sense of safety that it didn’t actually provide that led to him contracting the virus? We’ll never know.

What we do know is that he did miss out on a lot of things he loved in what came to be the last six months of his life. We know that he did everything that he was supposed to do according to the experts and still ended up catching the virus and dying. We know that he spent the last two weeks of his life in a hospital where his family couldn’t come and visit him. By the grace of God, we were able to get the hospital to allow a priest to come and give him the Sacrament of the sick and allow his wife to be with him at the end. The only reason they allowed her in is because she had had Covid, recovered, and was out of her quarantine. If that had not been the case, he would have died alone. I shudder to think how much more difficult this would be if those two things had not been allowed to happen. I feel anger and pain for all the patients and their families who were not allowed to be together when the end came. That is a grave injustice.

In the end, our days are numbered by our God. That doesn’t mean that we should live recklessly and tempt fate, but it also doesn’t mean we should sacrifice living life under the false notion that we can control everything, even death. So, we will soon bury a good man who lived a good life. However, I can’t help but wonder if he had the last 6 months to live again, he wouldn’t have made different choices.
our individual choices affect others. Love strangers like you love your family and god. We should spend our lives making sacrifices for the benefit of others. I'm sorry to hear how this ended. I respect that he did everything he could to make his community and his family as safe as possible.
 
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Baxter48

All-American
Sep 22, 2010
4,598
4,587
113
58
Gods country
Someone very dear to me died with Covid-19 on Friday.

Any of you who have read my posts on here probably know my thoughts on Covid and all the lockdowns and mandates that have been used to try to stop the spread. If you don’t, I’ll summarize: I thought that all of the lockdowns, mask mandates, school closures, sports cancellations, quarantines, and everything else has been a huge mistake and are doing little to nothing to save lives. As a matter-of-fact, I thought that there was a growing body of evidence that shows that the measures being employed to stop Covid have and will take way more life years than they will save due to lost jobs, isolation, etc. etc. Now that I have lost a loved one, I’m even more convinced of my previous position.

You see, my loved one and his wife did everything they were supposed to do. They masked up whenever they went out. They stopped going to church, didn’t see kids and grandkids nearly as much as they usually did, and almost completely stopped seeing friends. They stopped going to the grocery store and running errands like they had always done. In short, he and his wife almost completely isolated themselves. Nevertheless, they both got the virus.

For her, it was not much more than a cold with a low-grade fever for about 10 days. For him it was obviously much more serious. He had a couple of serious underlying conditions and was 81, but both my wife and I noticed how much he regressed from the beginning of the pandemic up to the time he contracted the virus. Was that due to the underlying conditions he was dealing with? Maybe. But both of us think that the isolation had a lot to do with his decline. He was the type of man who relished in his family, especially his grandkids. They were the apple of his eye and he would go to as many of their events as possible. He lit up talking to them and was so proud of each and every one of the 18 that he had.

If he hadn’t had to isolate and would have continued to have those human interactions that were so important to him, would it have made a difference? If he maintained those connections, would his health have remained good enough that he would have been able to fight off the virus when he got it? Had he not isolated, would he have contracted the virus earlier before his health declined and been able to fight it off? Although he did not go out often, did the mask he always wore give him a false sense of safety that it didn’t actually provide that led to him contracting the virus? We’ll never know.

What we do know is that he did miss out on a lot of things he loved in what came to be the last six months of his life. We know that he did everything that he was supposed to do according to the experts and still ended up catching the virus and dying. We know that he spent the last two weeks of his life in a hospital where his family couldn’t come and visit him. By the grace of God, we were able to get the hospital to allow a priest to come and give him the Sacrament of the sick and allow his wife to be with him at the end. The only reason they allowed her in is because she had had Covid, recovered, and was out of her quarantine. If that had not been the case, he would have died alone. I shudder to think how much more difficult this would be if those two things had not been allowed to happen. I feel anger and pain for all the patients and their families who were not allowed to be together when the end came. That is a grave injustice.

In the end, our days are numbered by our God. That doesn’t mean that we should live recklessly and tempt fate, but it also doesn’t mean we should sacrifice living life under the false notion that we can control everything, even death. So, we will soon bury a good man who lived a good life. However, I can’t help but wonder if he had the last 6 months to live again, he wouldn’t have made different choices.
Eternal rest grant unto them,O Lord and let perpetual light shine upon them
 

bingo65

Redshirt Freshman
Jun 18, 2020
532
380
63
Your friend is in Heaven with Christ.


You are right to question the last six months. We all should and need to go on living our lives. Enough is enough.
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
 

Jhollenbeck41

Senior
Gold Member
Nov 29, 2018
2,830
3,691
113
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
Why is it so hard for you to understand that some people just aren't as afraid it as you are?
 

huskerfan1414

Graduate Assistant
Oct 25, 2014
5,590
6,377
113
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
You are using inflated numbers and you know it.
Does grandma get to think for herself and live her life, or no?
This argument wont get anywhere. You believe what you believe and Im not going to change your mind.
I used to believe in the lockdown but the overwhelming evidence and moving of the goal posts has opened my eyes. Freedom is the answer. Live your life or dont. Thats all I have to say.
 

gw2kpro

Blackshirt
Dec 2, 2007
3,442
2,322
113
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
 

Baxter48

All-American
Sep 22, 2010
4,598
4,587
113
58
Gods country
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
Fortunately it’s still your choice you can go to a restaurant if you choose unless your in a state that still has everything closed, like I mentioned it’s not like nuclear fallout and everyone gets it. The op said they did everything correct and still got it. Be responsible but don’t live in a bubble live your life we never know when it’s our time. My wife has a 90 year old aunt and she goes to church does what she wants to she is extra careful
 

kerpal_68

Athletic Director
Dec 12, 2005
14,002
788
113
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
If only we knew the real number that isn't inflated. Why not just include in that number the increase in suicides and heart attacks caused from covid anxiety
 

The_Glove_Man

Junior
Jun 9, 2010
1,979
783
113
Madison, WI
First of all, my condolences as well.

Second, if you have been paying attention to anything I've said on this subject, you might be surprised to hear me now say that your post was well-written and I agree with a lot of it. We all make quality vs. quantity of life decisions all the time and there is a broad spectrum of defensible viewpoints on this subject. If we could all admit just that much, we might be able to find middle ground policy-wise, instead of feeling like we need to be extremely A to balance out all the extremely non-A people.
 

NUinnwks

Sophomore
Gold Member
Aug 4, 2003
1,149
551
113
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
Pretty cruel and heartless, dingo666. Go off to your cave and leave this thoughtful person alone.
 
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Huskers_Rule

First Team All-Big Ten
Jul 11, 2001
3,958
639
113
i know. 225,000 deaths in america alone is enough. but i really need to eat inside a restaurant. its really bothering me. your mom is old anyway and is going to die sometime anyway. and i desperately need my fried cheese appetizer sitting at an indoor table. why is this so hard to understand?
I trust you will have the same views the next bad flue season when 60k die. Or did you express these views during past flu seasons? If not why not? What is the magic #?
 

yort2000

Senior
Jan 23, 2007
2,005
1,180
113
Someone very dear to me died with Covid-19 on Friday.

Any of you who have read my posts on here probably know my thoughts on Covid and all the lockdowns and mandates that have been used to try to stop the spread. If you don’t, I’ll summarize: I thought that all of the lockdowns, mask mandates, school closures, sports cancellations, quarantines, and everything else has been a huge mistake and are doing little to nothing to save lives. As a matter-of-fact, I thought that there was a growing body of evidence that shows that the measures being employed to stop Covid have and will take way more life years than they will save due to lost jobs, isolation, etc. etc. Now that I have lost a loved one, I’m even more convinced of my previous position.

You see, my loved one and his wife did everything they were supposed to do. They masked up whenever they went out. They stopped going to church, didn’t see kids and grandkids nearly as much as they usually did, and almost completely stopped seeing friends. They stopped going to the grocery store and running errands like they had always done. In short, he and his wife almost completely isolated themselves. Nevertheless, they both got the virus.

For her, it was not much more than a cold with a low-grade fever for about 10 days. For him it was obviously much more serious. He had a couple of serious underlying conditions and was 81, but both my wife and I noticed how much he regressed from the beginning of the pandemic up to the time he contracted the virus. Was that due to the underlying conditions he was dealing with? Maybe. But both of us think that the isolation had a lot to do with his decline. He was the type of man who relished in his family, especially his grandkids. They were the apple of his eye and he would go to as many of their events as possible. He lit up talking to them and was so proud of each and every one of the 18 that he had.

If he hadn’t had to isolate and would have continued to have those human interactions that were so important to him, would it have made a difference? If he maintained those connections, would his health have remained good enough that he would have been able to fight off the virus when he got it? Had he not isolated, would he have contracted the virus earlier before his health declined and been able to fight it off? Although he did not go out often, did the mask he always wore give him a false sense of safety that it didn’t actually provide that led to him contracting the virus? We’ll never know.

What we do know is that he did miss out on a lot of things he loved in what came to be the last six months of his life. We know that he did everything that he was supposed to do according to the experts and still ended up catching the virus and dying. We know that he spent the last two weeks of his life in a hospital where his family couldn’t come and visit him. By the grace of God, we were able to get the hospital to allow a priest to come and give him the Sacrament of the sick and allow his wife to be with him at the end. The only reason they allowed her in is because she had had Covid, recovered, and was out of her quarantine. If that had not been the case, he would have died alone. I shudder to think how much more difficult this would be if those two things had not been allowed to happen. I feel anger and pain for all the patients and their families who were not allowed to be together when the end came. That is a grave injustice.

In the end, our days are numbered by our God. That doesn’t mean that we should live recklessly and tempt fate, but it also doesn’t mean we should sacrifice living life under the false notion that we can control everything, even death. So, we will soon bury a good man who lived a good life. However, I can’t help but wonder if he had the last 6 months to live again, he wouldn’t have made different choices.
Very heartfelt post and I definitely agree. My wife's 90 year old (I previously said 85, but I didn't know, she doesn't even seem 85 to me) grandmother was diagnosed with covid a little over a month ago. She is in a nursing home in Illinois that has been locked down from the beginning. No visitors in the nursing home, the only outside people she deals with are the people who work there and always have masks and gloves on when interacting with the residents and she still caught it. None of this crap works to stop a virus. If Fauci and Redfield think masks are so great, see if they would go into a lab with only a mask as protection and let a well known lethal virus loose in the air. No way in hell they would do that.
 
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