Huskers Back on Campus June 1

dinglefritz

Nebraska Legend
Jan 14, 2011
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Before a vaccine?!
The best thing a team captain could do would be to call a mandatory team meeting of ALL players. Then they need to invite a Wuhan Flu positive person to be the guest speaker. It would be required that the players ALL get at the very least one cough in their face to insure exposure. Guys this age would not get sick and they would likely develop protective immunity. Old style vaccination.
 

ZaneHickey

Defensive Coordinator
Dec 3, 2004
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The best thing a team captain could do would be to call a mandatory team meeting of ALL players. Then they need to invite a Wuhan Flu positive person to be the guest speaker. It would be required that the players ALL get at the very least one cough in their face to insure exposure. Guys this age would not get sick and they would likely develop protective immunity. Old style vaccination.
We exposed our first two kids to Chicken Pox. That is likely a more nasty ordeal to endure, for kids, than the Covid. Today, we'd probably be hauled in by DHHS.
 

RedCap

Nebraska Legend
Sep 29, 2001
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IMO I think the athletes are safer when they participate in University events/exercises/functions than they'd be back at home. My worry though is the off hours socializing. You know any college students are not going to be real big on social distancing and/or masks, just look at what's going on at the beaches.

The socializing on campus life is where the real danger is. And it just takes one of the players to be careless during off hours to become a carrier that then spreads it to the whole team during official workouts/exercises.

Not sure how the University is addressing this. I doubt they are keeping the athletes under full 24/7 quarantine.
 

ZaneHickey

Defensive Coordinator
Dec 3, 2004
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IMO I think the athletes are safer when they participate in University events/exercises/functions than they'd be back at home. My worry though is the off hours socializing. You know any college students are not going to be real big on social distancing and/or masks, just look at what's going on at the beaches.

The socializing on campus life is where the real danger is. And it just takes one of the players to be careless during off hours to become a carrier that then spreads it to the whole team during official workouts/exercises.

Not sure how the University is addressing this. I doubt they are keeping the athletes under full 24/7 quarantine.
This is all surreal. Hearing Moos talk about "navigating our way through this", etc. The "this" he is talking about is a plague that has killed a total of 150 Nebraskans. Not 150,000. Heaven help us if/when a much deadlier disease rolls through.
 

RedCap

Nebraska Legend
Sep 29, 2001
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This is all surreal. Hearing Moos talk about "navigating our way through this", etc. The "this" he is talking about is a plague that has killed a total of 150 Nebraskans. Not 150,000. Heaven help us if/when a much deadlier disease rolls through.
It's not necessarily the "deadly aspect" that's most different about this disease, it's the extremely high transmissible person-to-person nature and the ability of non-symptomatic carriers to bring it to the most vulnerable. That's why group activities where individuals are in close quarters where they likely exchange breath is an issue.

I don't have a solution but I foresee the potential for problems with college kids and the typical socializing that goes on around a campus. There may not be deaths among young people but I see the opportunity for the virus to rapidly be spread in that environment and as a result subsequently to more vulnerable groups than those young people.
 

dinglefritz

Nebraska Legend
Jan 14, 2011
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IMO I think the athletes are safer when they participate in University events/exercises/functions than they'd be back at home. My worry though is the off hours socializing. You know any college students are not going to be real big on social distancing and/or masks, just look at what's going on at the beaches.

The socializing on campus life is where the real danger is. And it just takes one of the players to be careless during off hours to become a carrier that then spreads it to the whole team during official workouts/exercises.

Not sure how the University is addressing this. I doubt they are keeping the athletes under full 24/7 quarantine.
It's really not a danger to them. It might be a danger to our coaching and support staff if it runs through the team. I'm serious when I say the best thing that could happen to our team is to expose the whole works. Then you don't have to worry about having multiple players quarantined during the school year. It would also somewhat provide a protective buffer around the staff.
 

dinglefritz

Nebraska Legend
Jan 14, 2011
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It's not necessarily the "deadly aspect" that's most different about this disease, it's the extremely high transmissible person-to-person nature and the ability of non-symptomatic carriers to bring it to the most vulnerable. That's why group activities where individuals are in close quarters where they likely exchange breath is an issue.

I don't have a solution but I foresee the potential for problems with college kids and the typical socializing that goes on around a campus. There may not be deaths among young people but I see the opportunity for the virus to rapidly be spread in that environment and as a result subsequently to more vulnerable groups than those young people.
They're now saying that they don't believe asymptomatic carriers shed the virus like they first thought. That's a game changer for several reasons. First the temperature checks become a reasonably good primary screening test. Second, it lowers the likelihood that we've got a huge number of asymptomatic people out spreading the virus. I'm not sure if that's good or bad because it slows population immunity. Right now it appears that over 70% of people never develop symptoms. In one study where they mass tested a workplace they had over 400 positive tests and none of the workers had sypmtoms.
 

huskerssalts

Defensive Coordinator
Oct 6, 2014
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Beatrice Nebraska
Yep, they say it’s the older people and people with underlining issues that have to worry. Football players and so on are some of the most healthiest people out there. Our players and most players would get through the illness and come right back like nothing even happened.
 
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dinglefritz

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Yep, they say it’s the older people and people with underlining issues that have to worry. Football players and so on are some of the most healthiest people out there. Our players and most players would get through the illness and come right back like nothing even happened.
My wife says that the CDC tells her that over 80% of the people over 70 with other predisposing factors other than age still live through having this virus IF they're diagnosed early and treated appropriately. Locally there's a heavy smoking heavy drinking 89 year old that is 2 weeks in to his fight with the virus. So far so good and I don't think they've put him on a vent.
 
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CatColumbia

All-American
Apr 19, 2014
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One day in Lincoln, the next day in Orlando
This is all surreal. Hearing Moos talk about "navigating our way through this", etc. The "this" he is talking about is a plague that has killed a total of 150 Nebraskans. Not 150,000. Heaven help us if/when a much deadlier disease rolls through.
He’s speaking to the parents of recruits who could be scared of Covid. He’s playing it safe by sounding extra cautious.
 

dinglefritz

Nebraska Legend
Jan 14, 2011
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i'm most worried about verducci
You mean Verduzco? He's not over 70 and he looks to be very fit. He would likely do fine if he caught it. Yeah it would be a bitch for 10-14 days maybe, but most people like him are surviving it.
 
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ZaneHickey

Defensive Coordinator
Dec 3, 2004
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It's really not a danger to them. It might be a danger to our coaching and support staff if it runs through the team. I'm serious when I say the best thing that could happen to our team is to expose the whole works. Then you don't have to worry about having multiple players quarantined during the school year. It would also somewhat provide a protective buffer around the staff.
The whole team taking a Corona vacation fo
It's really not a danger to them. It might be a danger to our coaching and support staff if it runs through the team. I'm serious when I say the best thing that could happen to our team is to expose the whole works. Then you don't have to worry about having multiple players quarantined during the school year. It would also somewhat provide a protective buffer around the staff.
Yes. And it for all of those reasons I am waiting for a return-to-normal announcement that begins, "Out of an abundance of facts, common sense, and testicular fortitude..."
 

dinglefritz

Nebraska Legend
Jan 14, 2011
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The whole team taking a Corona vacation fo

Yes. And it for all of those reasons I am waiting for a return-to-normal announcement that begins, "Out of an abundance of facts, common sense, and testicular fortitude..."
Michigan's president is a freaking MD immunologist. He KNOWS that there is virtually no risk to college students from this virus and yet he takes the stance he does? There's only one reason for that and that is kissing the ass of their governor for funding. Same for PSU etal.
 

ZaneHickey

Defensive Coordinator
Dec 3, 2004
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Michigan's president is a freaking MD immunologist. He KNOWS that there is virtually no risk to college students from this virus and yet he takes the stance he does? There's only one reason for that and that is kissing the ass of their governor for funding. Same for PSU etal.
I can't decide if there are a greater number of infuriating stories like that, or embarrassing ones. Local swimming pools closed for summer??? Is there a safer place, on Earth, for a child (almost ZERO risk, to begin with) to be than soaking in chlorine and the sun, boosting their immune system with D? My biggest concern, especially with any plan to delay things, is all the people who are weakening their immunity by avoiding everything. They might just get clobbered in the fall from regular seasonal stuff. It'll be blamed on a "second wave" and we'll be screwed over, yet again.
 

dinglefritz

Nebraska Legend
Jan 14, 2011
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I can't decide if there are a greater number of infuriating stories like that, or embarrassing ones. Local swimming pools closed for summer??? Is there a safer place, on Earth, for a child (almost ZERO risk, to begin with) to be than soaking in chlorine and the sun, boosting their immune system with D? My biggest concern, especially with any plan to delay things, is all the people who are weakening their immunity by avoiding everything. They might just get clobbered in the fall from regular seasonal stuff. It'll be blamed on a "second wave" and we'll be screwed over, yet again.
I don't think there's any question that there will be some type of increase in cases IF they send kids back to K-12 school. The question is what will people be willing to tolerate? We deal with this just about every year and have school closures at times for influenza. Do people get their flu shots to prevent it? Nope. IMO, it's pretty easy to protect a college professor or administrator. It's probably not so easy to protect a high school teacher although it doesn't look now like asymptomatic kids (which they all would be) can spread the virus. Hopefully we have better answers about that by September 1st.
 
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ZaneHickey

Defensive Coordinator
Dec 3, 2004
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I don't think there's any question that there will be some type of increase in cases IF they sends back to K-12 school. The question is what will people be willing to tolerate? We deal with this just about every year and have school closures at times for influenza. Do people get their flu shots to prevent it? Nope. IMO, it's pretty easy to protect a college professor or administrator. It's probably not so easy to protect a high school teacher although it doesn't look now like asymptomatic kids (which they all would be) can spread the virus. Hopefully we have better answers about that by September 1st.
I cringed when I heard Moos say something like, "until we get our arms around this virus"... The list of viruses we have control of is listed below...
 
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dinglefritz

Nebraska Legend
Jan 14, 2011
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I cringed when I heard Moos say something like, "until we get our arms around this virus"... The list of viruses we have control of is listed below...
well I think his point is that it seems like we find out something new every day. It's either that or the CDC has been lying to us for weeks. The new revelation that asymptomatic cases may not be able to transmit the virus is huge. They also dropped the info this past weekend that surfaces aren't a big source of infections.
 

RedCap

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Sep 29, 2001
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They're now saying that they don't believe asymptomatic carriers shed the virus like they first thought. That's a game changer for several reasons. First the temperature checks become a reasonably good primary screening test. Second, it lowers the likelihood that we've got a huge number of asymptomatic people out spreading the virus. I'm not sure if that's good or bad because it slows population immunity. Right now it appears that over 70% of people never develop symptoms. In one study where they mass tested a workplace they had over 400 positive tests and none of the workers had sypmtoms.
I hope that's true. The story from the medical professionals keeps changing though so it's really hard to know what to believe. For example, first masks were no good and now they're mandatory. First lockdowns were mandatory, now some believe that actually helped spread the disease in poor communities. Etc. Who knows.
 
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dinglefritz

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I hope that's true. The story from the medical professionals keeps changing though so it's really hard to know what to believe. For example, first masks were no good and now they're mandatory. First lockdowns were mandatory, now some believe that actually helped spread the disease in poor communities. Etc. Who knows.
The no masks thing was a blatant lie to try to keep people from hoarding them. We couldn't secure enough masks for people who actually needed them. as China was our primary supplier (like most things) and they were keeping all they made for themselves. I just shake my head at some of the "masks" I see in grocery stores and restaurants. I'm not sure they're worth them putting them on but whatever.
 
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RedCap

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The no masks thing was a blatant lie to try to keep people from hoarding them. We couldn't secure enough masks for people who actually needed them. as China was our primary supplier (like most things) and they were keeping all they made for themselves. I just shake my head at some of the "masks" I see in grocery stores and restaurants. I'm not sure they're worth them putting them on but whatever.
I agree the early no mask thing was likely to keep people from hoarding them BUT IMO that was a costly mistake. Any mask is better than none and I've seen some pretty decent homemade ones with good patterns/instructions online for making them. The consumer mask didn't have to be medical grade professional for people visiting grocery stores. That initial "lie" about them having no value cost lives IMO. That's on the Dr. Fauci types who knew better as infectious disease professionals. Asia was wearing masks from the very beginning.
 

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