Gas is $2.90 in Lincoln and rising per my local guy

LagunaHusker

Senior
Gold Member
Jan 8, 2004
2,940
5,126
113
Wigwam, AZ
$3.19 per gallon here in the West Valley. Good thing the current administration has outlawed fracking on federal lands and terminated the XL pipeline one wouldn't want cheap gas for the masses. Raising taxes ain't the answer in the long run either. Hold on boys it going to get worse before it gets better.
 

Jhollenbeck41

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Nov 29, 2018
5,440
8,530
113
Bale of alfalfa was $14 over the weekend. This time last year was $7. That and corn prices. Farmers about to get rich as shit in 2021.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nelsonj22

knightwxc5000

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
May 16, 2003
5,161
9,738
113
$3.19 per gallon here in the West Valley. Good thing the current administration has outlawed fracking on federal lands and terminated the XL pipeline one wouldn't want cheap gas for the masses. Raising taxes ain't the answer in the long run either. Hold on boys it going to get worse before it gets better.
Just so I'm clear, we're blaming gas prices rising on the canceling of a pipeline that wasn't operational yet and a bill (Green New Deal) that hasn't even been voted on and is nowhere near becoming a law? Lord help us as a country.
 

huskerj12

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2007
12,825
21,779
113
And people thought the Green New Deal was about the environment. In reality the Green it refers to is cash in the pockets of the corrupt.
The Green New Deal, which is not a policy the current administration has even proposed let alone turned into law, is secretly a plan to make gas prices go up and make more money for corrupt oil companies? I can't keep up with how this is supposed to work.
 

Jhollenbeck41

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Nov 29, 2018
5,440
8,530
113
Just so I'm clear, we're blaming gas prices rising on the canceling of a pipeline that wasn't operational yet and a bill (Green New Deal) that hasn't even been voted on and is nowhere near becoming a law? Lord help us as a country.
I'm personally blaming it on stimulus packages and free money for people to stay home instead of going to work, causing inflation of literally everything
 

wally7474

Walk On
Gold Member
Jan 17, 2015
211
191
43
We are at the beginning of seeing hyper-inflation. Gas and food (not to mention lumber) are going to go through the roof here soon. Summer time always brings a different demand schedule for oil companies due to summer vacations and people driving longer distances etc. This inflation is a hidden tax on all of us. Amazing how someone can make that big of a difference is just over 4 months of work. Hold on to your wallets folks!
 
  • Haha
Reactions: nelsonj22

DRay827

Senior
Gold Member
Aug 28, 2016
2,204
4,559
113
Lincoln, NE
Per my local guy who owns 20+ stations in Lincoln, prices will come back to pre-pandemic levels in late June or early July once supply catches up.

It's almost like there's more demand because we're getting past a global pandemic and everyone is travelling again.

But don't let that stop you from blaming commodity prices for the rest of your problems, this is a safe space for you to vent.
 

huskerj12

Head Coach
Gold Member
Oct 3, 2007
12,825
21,779
113
I'm personally blaming it on stimulus packages and free money for people to stay home instead of going to work, causing inflation of literally everything
Yeah it's gonna be tough and weird, I don't think anybody can expect any kind of "normal" predictable recovery process when we're dealing with the effects of an unprecedented year-long disaster event that caused a complete whiplash on supply/demand in every part of the economy. There's no use in thinking any of this is happening in a Covid-less vacuum.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nelsonj22

...TrueColors...

College Football Hall of Fame
Jan 22, 2009
22,989
51,775
113
Yeah it's gonna be tough and weird, I don't think anybody can expect any kind of "normal" predictable recovery process when we're dealing with the effects of an unprecedented year-long disaster event that caused a complete whiplash on supply/demand in every part of the economy.

We didn’t need a 2 trillion dollar stimulus.
 

knightwxc5000

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
May 16, 2003
5,161
9,738
113
I'm personally blaming it on stimulus packages and free money for people to stay home instead of going to work, causing inflation of literally everything
Has more to do with demand rising again as we are emerging from COVID. Gas prices are still lower than they were compared to the average price last decade. Prices bottomed out during the pandemic/recession. They are recovering now.

The people not working trope is a lazy take that isn't supported by data or research.
 

bleed husker red

Senior
Gold Member
Dec 1, 2002
2,833
2,440
113
How is it that sams club in Lincoln is selling 91 octane for the same or less than 87 octane in the rest of the city?

Seems to me like every one trying to get rich off of gas. Used to be the margin at the pump was a few cents, hence the need to draw you in for over priced food and snacks.

Now they are butt raping you at the pump and with the food.
 
  • Like
Reactions: nelsonj22

HuskerIsNumberOne

Offensive Coordinator
Gold Member
Aug 3, 2018
8,846
12,590
113
Lincoln
I agree that it's going to get bad. We haven't even hit the summer traveling season yet. I'd like to go on a road trip this summer with my girlfriend but if the prices of gas remains high, instead of going to a nice steakhouse in the western part of Nebraska, we'll probably opt for cold cut sandwiches from the grocery store.

Very romantic.
 

MissouriHusker

Graduate Assistant
Gold Member
Jan 8, 2004
5,400
4,345
113
Wildwood MO
I was told inflation was a good thing, and not to worry about it.
Some inflation is good. Too little means the economy is likely struggling in some way while too much means it is running a bit hot. 2% or so will be fine over time most likely. The fear for some is that it will be above that somewhat for awhile. How much is debatable and depends on the data used. The debate is how much and how long (is it transitory is the question). If it moves up around 3% or higher and the 10-year moves above 2.5% or so, it could cause the Fed to jump in sooner than currently expected.

Oil is up with the weak dollar (like most commodities), demand concerns with the developing world struggling more with COVID (think India mostly, which has been growing in oil demand % than even China) and supply restraints by OPEC. Lots of moving pieces when it comes to oil. Was an energy sector analyst for several years, so I watch this stuff a lot.
 

ScarletNCream

Athletic Director
Gold Member
Jan 4, 2007
13,528
24,333
113
There’s something really annoying about taking something as complex as why gas prices are going up right now and simply saying “Welp, Green new deal” or “Welp, there’s that inflation”...

I don’t understand half of everything feeding into it beyond demand coming back up post pandemic but it’s certainly not as simple as “those damn liberals are at it again”
 

Soda Popinski

All-American
Gold Member
Oct 15, 2009
4,296
8,143
113
Lincoln via Moscow
Some inflation is good. Too little means the economy is likely struggling in some way while too much means it is running a bit hot. 2% or so will be fine over time most likely. The fear for some is that it will be above that somewhat for awhile. How much is debatable and depends on the data used. The debate is how much and how long (is it transitory is the question). If it moves up around 3% or higher and the 10-year moves above 2.5% or so, it could cause the Fed to jump in sooner than currently expected.

Oil is up with the weak dollar (like most commodities), demand concerns with the developing world struggling more with COVID (think India mostly, which has been growing in oil demand % than even China) and supply restraints by OPEC. Lots of moving pieces when it comes to oil. Was an energy sector analyst for several years, so I watch this stuff a lot.
Agreed. There are these exterior factors that you mention. There’s also the completely unnecessary American “rescue” plan that flooded the money supply (again). FTR, I wasn’t a fan of Trump’s quantitative easing either.

The problem is, both administrations want to take credit for saving the economy. So much so, that they don’t really care what the consequences are. The timing of this pandemic couldn’t have been worse.
 

Latest posts