Covid survivors

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dinglefritz

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Worldometer has Nebraska at a known infection rate of 1%. IF you believe some Dr.s at the CDC estimate that there are 10X as many people either infected or recovered as we have positive tests for, then that would make Nebraska's population immunity potentially in the 10% range. That's still a lot when you think about it. One in 10 people you would meet walking down the street would either have had it or currently have it. Realistically I would think the number would be much higher than that for people who have to work in public or who frequent bars.
 

JoelBittner

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1,200+ Health Professionals Sign Letter Approving of SJW Protests that violate social distancing rules – but Disapproving of Lockdown Protests that violate said same rules --- "doesn't sound like science to me"
 
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GBRforLife1

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Just heard a story on the radio yesterday that in the serological studies they're doing in New York, the Bronx has a greater than 70% positive result via serology. Cumo said "we've tamed the beast. We can begin opening up." He and Deblasio screwed this up royally. They made just about every wrong move you could make.
The govt always does it backwards.
 
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GBRforLife1

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you mean like the viruses that cause the common cold - one of which is a coronavirus - how has that worked out out for a durable antibody response? Or influenza, which has a different strain every year - no durable antibody response - needs a new vaccine each year.
Are you trying to say each time you get the common cold it's like you've never had it before?
 

jlb321

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Are you trying to say each time you get the common cold it's like you've never had it before?
no -- I'm saying you likely have a period of immunity of varying degree - but people get numerous common colds each year -- there is not lasting immunity

there has been work around effective treatment- prevention-vaccines of the common cold for decades - granted there is a bit more incentive now

likewise influenza strains are different each year -- in the absence of a vaccine having influenza in 2019 does not necessarily protect you in 2020 -- they have to tailor an influenza vaccine to what they believe to be the most likely strains for the upcoming years - some years they are more correct than others

no one knows if you get COVID how long the effective antibody response lasts - this notion of lets get everyone infected and get it over with is fool-hearty - too many assumptions being made about a novel (new) virus where there is collectively only 6-7 months of world wide experience.
 
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jlb321

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Isn't it likely there are different viruses that cause each cold?
There are - and you are likely immune for short periods of time to each one - the degree and length of immunity varies but it isn’t lasting for years
 

JoelBittner

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no -- I'm saying you likely have a period of immunity of varying degree - but people get numerous common colds each year -- there is not lasting immunity

there has been work around effective treatment- prevention-vaccines of the common cold for decades - granted there is a bit more incentive now

likewise influenza strains are different each year -- in the absence of a vaccine having influenza in 2019 does not necessarily protect you in 2020 -- they have to tailor an influenza vaccine to what they believe to be the most likely strains for the upcoming years - some years they are more correct than others

no one knows if you get COVID how long the effective antibody response lasts - this notion of lets get everyone infected and get it over with is fool-hearty - too many assumptions being made about a novel (new) virus where there is collectively only 6-7 months of world wide experience.
why didn't we shut down the nation for the swine flu or a dozen other pathogens over the last 30 years . . . what about the 1957 and 1968 pandemics that started in the orient? . . . remember how aids was going to devastate our population? . . . what about the 2.2 million that were supposed to be dead by now?
 
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jlb321

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why didn't we shut down the nation for the swine flu or a dozen other pathogens over the last 30 years . . . what about the 1957 and 1968 pandemics that started in the orient? . . . remember how aids was going to devastate our population? . . . what about the 2.2 million that were supposed to be dead by now?
I don’t know - you would have to ask the people who have the authority to shut things down - health professionals don’t control the economy nor can they direct bars, clubs, restaurants, etc to close.

The US response hasn’t been different than other nations worldwide - if anything we were slower to close and quicker to open

likewise our response to H1N1 influenza in 2009 was proportional to the response in the rest of the world
 
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donahues17

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Those short on brains do weird shit. Last year they ate detergent pods now it’s wrecking statues and peoples businesses. Next year they might move to cutting off their junk.
Dont forget about the morons who wanted to invade Area 51. Thats a special kind of stupid. I wish they would have, probably wouldn't be as many people rioting and looting. They all would have gotten taken by aliens.
 

wkato

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I had something similar in December/ January. Started about Dec 23rd, got real bad from the 27th to 3rd. Then went to the doctor on the 6th and was diagnosed with bronchitis.
Could have been that. A weeks later my wife had the exact same thing. Here's the weird part, I had ordered a couple items off ebay and they showed up a few days prior to getting sick. The items came straight from China. Makes a person wonder.
 
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dinglefritz

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why didn't we shut down the nation for the swine flu or a dozen other pathogens over the last 30 years . . . what about the 1957 and 1968 pandemics that started in the orient? . . . remember how aids was going to devastate our population? . . . what about the 2.2 million that were supposed to be dead by now?
This whole debacle has largely been driven by the crappy situations in Italy and then our own New York and Seattle. New York absolutely screwed the pooch with how they handled it. Cuomo and DeBlasio are incompetent buffoons who've been given a pass by the NY Times. When New York City suffers, the media goes nuts. Even then it was primarily certain boroughs in the city and not the whole state that was crushed.
 
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dinglefritz

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There are - and you are likely immune for short periods of time to each one - the degree and length of immunity varies but it isn’t lasting for years
Nobody has said immunity to COVID was going to last for years. Nobody. Personally I think it may last for longer than what many think.
 

jlb321

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It is a novel virus with little world-wide experience. The certainty of any information at this time is limited and will be rapidly changing.

Months ago hydroxychloroquine was being touted which has now been debunked for inpatients and even felt to cause more harm than any good

The most landmark studies in medicine and critical care showed reduced mortality in the 20-30% range. There is no way that signal can be recognized at an individual patient level or in observational studies.
 
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Blindcheck

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The biggest reason we locked down for this virus and not for H1N1:

The length of time that pre-symptomatic people shed the virus can be up to a week or longer. With H1N1, generally the virus only spreads when symptoms are present. Most people stay home already when they have the flu, so you don't need to lock down.

If Covid was only be contracted from people that had symptoms, there would not have been a lockdown.

The fact that people that haven't shown symptoms are shedding the virus is what makes this virus so tough to contain.
 

Dean Pope

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why didn't we shut down the nation for the swine flu or a dozen other pathogens over the last 30 years . . . what about the 1957 and 1968 pandemics that started in the orient? . . . remember how aids was going to devastate our population? . . . what about the 2.2 million that were supposed to be dead by now?
We didn't shut down the nation for swine flu because it was a flu. Older people had some built in immunity and a vaccine was quickly available. I'm not going to bother to try to answer the rest other than to say that the world population is much more mobile today than it was even 15 years ago.
 
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dinglefritz

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We didn't shut down the nation for swine flu because it was a flu. Older people had some built in immunity and a vaccine was quickly available. I'm not going to bother to try to answer the rest other than to say that the world population is much more mobile today than it was even 15 years ago.
Older patients did not have "some built in immunity" to swine flu. We did the sensible thing then and locked down the nursing homes not the whole damned country. Three states on the east coast forced nursing homes to take COVID positive patients. So much for the "lockdown" doing any good to protect the elderly. Try again at an excuse for gubernatorial incompetence. IF they had quarantined nursing facilities and screened workers there for nothing more than a fever, we would have had THOUSANDS of fewer deaths out there. The state of Washington at least has an excuse with the way it hit them before they knew what was going on.
 
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dinglefritz

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The biggest reason we locked down for this virus and not for H1N1:

The length of time that pre-symptomatic people shed the virus can be up to a week or longer. With H1N1, generally the virus only spreads when symptoms are present. Most people stay home already when they have the flu, so you don't need to lock down.

If Covid was only be contracted from people that had symptoms, there would not have been a lockdown.

The fact that people that haven't shown symptoms are shedding the virus is what makes this virus so tough to contain.
No we had a lockdown to prevent the healthcare systems from being overwhelmed. Somebody needed to tell Cuomo that if he didn't want his healthcare system to get overwhelmed maybe he shouldn't force the facilities with the MOST vulnerable patients to admit COVID positive people.
 
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jlb321

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No we had a lockdown to prevent the healthcare systems from being overwhelmed. Somebody needed to tell Cuomo that if he didn't want his healthcare system to get overwhelmed maybe he shouldn't force the facilities with the MOST vulnerable patients to admit COVID positive people.
we are going to find out if other states learned anything at all from what took place in NY - it doesn’t appear some were paying attention.
 

dinglefritz

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we are going to find out if other states learned anything at all from what took place in NY - it doesn’t appear some were paying attention.
Some are reaping the rewards of thousands of people walking side by side for hours on end screaming profanities at cops. This isn't all about bars being open. We've had open bars in our area for weeks and we haven't seen any increase in our COVID cases. Minneapolis, Houston, LA, etc ? You betcha. Wonder why? Wisconsin has had open bars for what a couple of months? Seeing any "spike" there after their supreme court let the bars open? Why is it now suddenly 15 to 25 year olds showing up positive as somebody (you?) posted on here a few days ago? I'm not a fan of opening up bars to full occupancy but we need to be honest about what is really going on here.
 
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jlb321

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Some are reaping the rewards of thousands of people walking side by side for hours on end screaming profanities at cops. This isn't all about bars being open. We've had open bars in our area for weeks and we haven't seen any increase in our COVID cases. Minneapolis, Houston, LA, etc ? You betcha. Wonder why? Wisconsin has had open bars for what a couple of months? Seeing any "spike" there after their supreme court let the bars open? Why is it now suddenly 15 to 25 year olds showing up positive as somebody (you?) posted on here a few days ago? I'm not a fan of opening up bars to full occupancy but we need to be honest about what is really going on here.
All are likely true ... but that focuses on the why ... which unfortunately isn’t going to change reality

going to be lots of surges and some states are already going backwards as far as openings
 

Tuco Salamanca

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All are likely true ... but that focuses on the why ... which unfortunately isn’t going to change reality

going to be lots of surges and some states are already going backwards as far as openings
Correct. People on the left, like you, never want to deal with the why, unless it is to blame the bars for being open. Funny how the pressure to close the bars in Texas comes after the “protests” are basically over down here. Timing seems convenient, at a minimum. Now the moron Mayor and his crony county judge, can still push their agenda and blame the bars being open and not the 60k standing side by side for hours and the parade of people attending a funeral and memorial service.
 
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dinglefritz

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All are likely true ... but that focuses on the why ... which unfortunately isn’t going to change reality

going to be lots of surges and some states are already going backwards as far as openings
Nebraska is going to be an interesting test case. If we're going to have open bars, I think we need to make them open the doors up and turn off the AC. Stick a huge box fan in the back door and suck the air through as fast as you can. No AC. It might be time to go back to screen doors and box fans for public places.
 

jlb321

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Correct. People on the left, like you, never want to deal with the why, unless it is Now the moron Mayor and his crony county judge, can still push their agenda and blame the bars being open and not the 60k standing side by side for hours and the parade of people attending a funeral and memorial service.
Please show me where I said the protests didn’t play a big role in spikes - they very likely did - as will any large gatherings outside and smaller gatherings indoor

not sure how one can assign these surges to the protests and then argue that anything but bare minimal attendance can occur at sporting events


from my understanding it wasn’t a mayor or judge in Texas that closed down bars and reduced capacity at restaurants - it was the governor
 
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jlb321

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Some are reaping the rewards of thousands of people walking side by side for hours on end screaming profanities .
yes, likely -- which is why I stated above that you can't have thousands standing together for hours (likely worse than walking) in sports stadiums

as far as viral spread it doesn't much matter whether the thousands of people are present to protest or watch their favorite team
 
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GBRforLife1

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Correct. People on the left, like you, never want to deal with the why, unless it is to blame the bars for being open. Funny how the pressure to close the bars in Texas comes after the “protests” are basically over down here. Timing seems convenient, at a minimum. Now the moron Mayor and his crony county judge, can still push their agenda and blame the bars being open and not the 60k standing side by side for hours and the parade of people attending a funeral and memorial service.
Idiot govt leaders didn't learn anything from the last shut down. Total stupidity.
 
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leodisflowers

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All are likely true ... but that focuses on the why ... which unfortunately isn’t going to change reality

going to be lots of surges and some states are already going backwards as far as openings
Yet the death rate still trending down. Time is only going to help us fight this thing as we find more therapeutics and hopefully a vaccine. This thing is nasty, but people are not leaving in near as much fear (thank god).
 
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jlb321

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Yet the death rate still trending down. Time is only going to help us fight this thing as we find more therapeutics and hopefully a vaccine. This thing is nasty, but people are not leaving in near as much fear (thank god).
I do not know what the death rate will do - but previously deaths lagged spikes in cases by a few weeks
 

dinglefritz

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I do not know what the death rate will do - but previously deaths lagged spikes in cases by a few weeks
I think it's not reality to be calling the increase in cases a "spike". I know everybody is doing it but these are more of a bump in the curve than a spike. EVERYBODY has said/known that different locales were going to become hot spots at different times as we travel through this mess. Using the word spike IMO is just another way to fuel fear. I don't think the rise in number of deaths is going to be as pronounced now just due to the age group we're detecting as positive now. Most of the new cases being detected are younger people who aren't going to die from this.
 

Tuco Salamanca

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Please show me where I said the protests didn’t play a big role in spikes - they very likely did - as will any large gatherings outside and smaller gatherings indoor

not sure how one can assign these surges to the protests and then argue that anything but bare minimal attendance can occur at sporting events


from my understanding it wasn’t a mayor or judge in Texas that closed down bars and reduced capacity at restaurants - it was the governor
the governor is not a strong leader. He doesn’t really stand for anything, he sticks his finger in the air to see where he will get the least resistance and goes that way.

luckily, so far, he has resisted the urge to allow city leaders to put local stay in place orders in place. Of course the crony judge came in contact with one of her staffers, who had Covid, and decided to quarantine for the week. I wonder where the staffer got the virus, the bar or the big celebration of life, where there were few wearing masks?

my point was that, you do need to know the why. You do need to know how this new spike originated. We can guess it was from the bars and restaurants. However the problem with that is that restaurants were open at 50% prior to the bars were open. Those restaurants with bars are allowed to sell drinks and people were allowed to sit around the bar. I have to imagine the 50-75 people in the bar probably didn’t have the affect on the spike as did the 60k standing side by side with maybe half wearing masks.
 

jlb321

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the governor is not a strong leader. He doesn’t really stand for anything, he sticks his finger in the air to see where he will get the least resistance and goes that way.

luckily, so far, he has resisted the urge to allow city leaders to put local stay in place orders in place. Of course the crony judge came in contact with one of her staffers, who had Covid, and decided to quarantine for the week. I wonder where the staffer got the virus, the bar or the big celebration of life, where there were few wearing masks?

my point was that, you do need to know the why. You do need to know how this new spike originated. We can guess it was from the bars and restaurants. However the problem with that is that restaurants were open at 50% prior to the bars were open. Those restaurants with bars are allowed to sell drinks and people were allowed to sit around the bar. I have to imagine the 50-75 people in the bar probably didn’t have the affect on the spike as did the 60k standing side by side with maybe half wearing masks.
agree it is important to understand the why -- why are there increasing cases and if it is related to the riots - which certainly contributed - then you have to ask why were there riots - (lets not debate this - it will end being too divisive)

sometimes it only takes a little gasoline (a singular event at a specific time) thrown onto a smoldering fire to turn it into an inferno
- like the murder/assassination of an individual - Prince Ferninand in 1914 igniting WW1
 

Tuco Salamanca

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agree it is important to understand the why -- why are there increasing cases and if it is related to the riots - which certainly contributed - then you have to ask why were there riots - (lets not debate this - it will end being too divisive)

sometimes it only takes a little gasoline (a singular event at a specific time) thrown onto a smoldering fire to turn it into an inferno
- like the murder/assassination of an individual - Prince Ferninand in 1914 igniting WW1
OK. I just find it strange that from the middle of May until the end of May there were plenty of places to hang out at a "bar"/ restaurant in the Houston area, you could sit side by side etc.. in that time, the cases did not increase, Then, the bars opened, and at the same time, the Floyd stuff happened in Houston. Now people want to automatically assume it is because of the bars. I went to 3 bars one weekend, two weekends ago, at all 3, social distancing measures were in place and masks were worn by 75-80% of the patrons. I know that is just 3 bars, but it is at least a sample. I know that I can look at the tapes from the "protests" and see masks weren't worn and social distancing measures weren't adhered to.

But, isn't it weird how only one gets blamed for the spike?
 

leodisflowers

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OK. I just find it strange that from the middle of May until the end of May there were plenty of places to hang out at a "bar"/ restaurant in the Houston area, you could sit side by side etc.. in that time, the cases did not increase, Then, the bars opened, and at the same time, the Floyd stuff happened in Houston. Now people want to automatically assume it is because of the bars. I went to 3 bars one weekend, two weekends ago, at all 3, social distancing measures were in place and masks were worn by 75-80% of the patrons. I know that is just 3 bars, but it is at least a sample. I know that I can look at the tapes from the "protests" and see masks weren't worn and social distancing measures weren't adhered to.

But, isn't it weird how only one gets blamed for the spike?
Yep!
 

vs540husker

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jlb321

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I’ve been seeing reports of this for a little while now but never an actual number associated with how many people would suffer long term/permanent affects. If this one is even close to accurate, 1 out of 10 is a lot higher number than I would’ve ever anticipated. Hopefully it’s way off.
lots of long term effects after an ICU stay - only 56% are able to return to work + significant financial toxicity






 
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Blindcheck

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No we had a lockdown to prevent the healthcare systems from being overwhelmed. Somebody needed to tell Cuomo that if he didn't want his healthcare system to get overwhelmed maybe he shouldn't force the facilities with the MOST vulnerable patients to admit COVID positive people.
Yes, that is true, but if the virus was only transmitted by people that had symptoms, you wouldn't need to lockdown, because those with symptoms would just stay home.
 
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