Brilliance Detected in Minneapolis...

zar45

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"TakeCharge is a new organization committed to countering the prevailing narrative in popular culture that America is structured to undermine the lives of black Americans."

Wouldn't a more noble cause be to tell the truth? Not just counter your opposition's narrative?
 

zar45

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There's literally not a shred of evidence to support this. Literally.
Unfortunately, you can look at that Civil Rights Act of 1964 and find that it was passed BY REPUBLICANS. Oh, looky there, Democrats voted against equal rights (and if we're honest, they vote against equal rights today as well). Doh! Looks like your theory holds NO water.

The original House version:[29]
  • Democratic Party: 152–96 (61–39%)
  • Republican Party: 138–34 (80–20%)
Cloture in the Senate:[30]
  • Democratic Party: 44–23 (66–34%)
  • Republican Party: 27–6 (82–18%)
The Senate version:[29]
  • Democratic Party: 46–21 (69–31%)
  • Republican Party: 27–6 (82–18%)
The Senate version, voted on by the House:[29]
  • Democratic Party: 153–91 (63–37%)
  • Republican Party: 136–35 (80–20%)


There is a ton of evidence of a shift in the parties. Here's a few:

1. Tons of Democrats left the party. A Cursory list: John Tower, Ed Gurney, Bill Dickinson, Thad Cochran, Jesse Helms, Taylor O'Hearn, WD Workman, Marshall Parker, Mills Godwin, Arthur Ravenel Jr., Jack Cox, Stanford Morse, Albert Goldthwaite, Roderick Miller, Marshall Parker, James L. Bentley, Jack B Ray, Crawford Pilcher, Alpha A Fowler Jr., Phil Campbell, Strom Thurmond, Iris Faircloth Blitch, James D Martin, Albert Watson, William C Cramer, Bo Callaway, Dave Treen, Floyd Spence, Speedy O Long, and Trent Lott. Most for explicitly racist reasons.

2. The Democratic party went from the party of slavery to, largely, the party of the KKK to: Harry Truman (D) aggressively pursuing the recommendations of the "President's Committee on Civil Rights" precipitating the break off of the Dixiecrats; JFK (D) introducing the "Civil Rights Act of 1964", the Democrat controlled Committee pushing it to a vote in the House, the Democrat controlled house passing it, the Democrat controlled Senate passing it, and LBJ (D) signing it into law; and LBJ (D) introducing the "Voting Rights Act of 1965", the Democrat controlled Committee pushing it to a vote in the House, the Democrat controlled house passing it, the Democrat controlled Senate passing it, and LBJ (D) signing it into law.

3. Republicans went from the party of Lincoln to the party of the Confederate flag, Confederate statues, and Confederate namesakes; the party more likely to disapprove of interracial marriage; and the party least likely to find racism a big problem.

4. In regards to the CRA vote, House Republicans from former Confederate States voted 0-11 (0% for) while House Democrats from former Confederate States voted 8-83 (9% for). Senate Republicans from former Confederate States voted 0-1 (0% for) while Senate Democrats voted 1-20 (5% for). In the Northern states, House Republicans voted 136-24 (85% for), House Democrats 145-8 (95% for), Senate Republicans voted 27-5 (84% for), and Senate Democrats voted 45-1 (98% for).

5. Republicans explicitly abandoned civil rights. In 1960 the Republican Party platform mentioned Civil Rights 11 times; 1964, 3 times; and by 1968 the Republican Party Platform mentioned Civil Rights ZERO times. The 1972 Republican Party platform mentions it twice, then it disappears again in 1976. Meanwhile the Democrat Party platform mentions Civil rights consistently from 1948-present.

6. The African American community knew it was happening in real time. In 1962 when asked which party "is more likely to see to it that negroes get fair treatment in jobs and housing", 22.7% of those polled said Democrats, 21.3% said Republican, and 55.9% said neither. When asked again in 1964, 60% of those polled said Democrats, 7% said Republican, and 33% said neither. In the presidential races, after a ~20 point margin in favor of the Democrats in 1956, blacks voted in favor of the Democrat by a ~33 point margin in 1962, and have maintained a minimum of a 65 point margin ever since. Party registration, for blacks, went from even (40%R/40%D) in 1944, to a ~30 point Democrat margin in 1948, to a minimum of a 60 point margin after 1964.

7. In every facet of federal government, the evidence presents itself as well. After Republicans' boasted the first 21 black Representatives in the House and the first 3 black Senators (without a single Democrat), the 116th Congress demographics were 2 black Democratic Senators to 1 black Republican Senator (only one since 1979) and 54 black House Democrats to 1 black House Republican, the 117th Congress demographics are now 2 black Democratic Senators (including the 7th since 1979) to 1 black Republican Senator (only one since 1979) and 54 black House Democrats to 1 black House Republican. Court appointments (Since Truman), Democrat-Republican, go: 1-1 in Supreme Court, 39-9 in the Court of Appeals, 143-54 in District Courts, and 6-3 in other Federal Courts. Needless to say Obama and Kamala are the first black holders' of their respective office as well.

8. In 2005, Ken Mehlman, the Republican National Committee chairman, apologized to the NAACP for the Southern Strategy's pandering to white racists.
 

biscuitbagger3

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Racists, non-racists, everyone voted for Reagan. Your theory holds no water. PS - you admit that your BS timeline of the big switch happening in 1964 is false because you have to reach into the 80’s to shoehorn your theory into reality.
It's just a widely recognized thing. It's not my theory. I also said Nixon and and Regan, literally 3 of the next 4 Presidential elections. Sorry that concept and the fact that these things are overnight is tough for you. Read a book on it I guess.
 

Oldschool1964

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There is a ton of evidence of a shift in the parties. Here's a few:

1. Tons of Democrats left the party. A Cursory list: John Tower, Ed Gurney, Bill Dickinson, Thad Cochran, Jesse Helms, Taylor O'Hearn, WD Workman, Marshall Parker, Mills Godwin, Arthur Ravenel Jr., Jack Cox, Stanford Morse, Albert Goldthwaite, Roderick Miller, Marshall Parker, James L. Bentley, Jack B Ray, Crawford Pilcher, Alpha A Fowler Jr., Phil Campbell, Strom Thurmond, Iris Faircloth Blitch, James D Martin, Albert Watson, William C Cramer, Bo Callaway, Dave Treen, Floyd Spence, Speedy O Long, and Trent Lott. Most for explicitly racist reasons.

2. The Democratic party went from the party of slavery to, largely, the party of the KKK to: Harry Truman (D) aggressively pursuing the recommendations of the "President's Committee on Civil Rights" precipitating the break off of the Dixiecrats; JFK (D) introducing the "Civil Rights Act of 1964", the Democrat controlled Committee pushing it to a vote in the House, the Democrat controlled house passing it, the Democrat controlled Senate passing it, and LBJ (D) signing it into law; and LBJ (D) introducing the "Voting Rights Act of 1965", the Democrat controlled Committee pushing it to a vote in the House, the Democrat controlled house passing it, the Democrat controlled Senate passing it, and LBJ (D) signing it into law.

3. Republicans went from the party of Lincoln to the party of the Confederate flag, Confederate statues, and Confederate namesakes; the party more likely to disapprove of interracial marriage; and the party least likely to find racism a big problem.

4. In regards to the CRA vote, House Republicans from former Confederate States voted 0-11 (0% for) while House Democrats from former Confederate States voted 8-83 (9% for). Senate Republicans from former Confederate States voted 0-1 (0% for) while Senate Democrats voted 1-20 (5% for). In the Northern states, House Republicans voted 136-24 (85% for), House Democrats 145-8 (95% for), Senate Republicans voted 27-5 (84% for), and Senate Democrats voted 45-1 (98% for).

5. Republicans explicitly abandoned civil rights. In 1960 the Republican Party platform mentioned Civil Rights 11 times; 1964, 3 times; and by 1968 the Republican Party Platform mentioned Civil Rights ZERO times. The 1972 Republican Party platform mentions it twice, then it disappears again in 1976. Meanwhile the Democrat Party platform mentions Civil rights consistently from 1948-present.

6. The African American community knew it was happening in real time. In 1962 when asked which party "is more likely to see to it that negroes get fair treatment in jobs and housing", 22.7% of those polled said Democrats, 21.3% said Republican, and 55.9% said neither. When asked again in 1964, 60% of those polled said Democrats, 7% said Republican, and 33% said neither. In the presidential races, after a ~20 point margin in favor of the Democrats in 1956, blacks voted in favor of the Democrat by a ~33 point margin in 1962, and have maintained a minimum of a 65 point margin ever since. Party registration, for blacks, went from even (40%R/40%D) in 1944, to a ~30 point Democrat margin in 1948, to a minimum of a 60 point margin after 1964.

7. In every facet of federal government, the evidence presents itself as well. After Republicans' boasted the first 21 black Representatives in the House and the first 3 black Senators (without a single Democrat), the 116th Congress demographics were 2 black Democratic Senators to 1 black Republican Senator (only one since 1979) and 54 black House Democrats to 1 black House Republican, the 117th Congress demographics are now 2 black Democratic Senators (including the 7th since 1979) to 1 black Republican Senator (only one since 1979) and 54 black House Democrats to 1 black House Republican. Court appointments (Since Truman), Democrat-Republican, go: 1-1 in Supreme Court, 39-9 in the Court of Appeals, 143-54 in District Courts, and 6-3 in other Federal Courts. Needless to say Obama and Kamala are the first black holders' of their respective office as well.

8. In 2005, Ken Mehlman, the Republican National Committee chairman, apologized to the NAACP for the Southern Strategy's pandering to white racists.
Cool - wanna link to your source, which is some dude's opinions?

1. All of these are lower-level local reps. Look at Congress. How many changed parties? I'll let you discover that huge number of D's that switched to R's and R's that switched to D's. If it was a big switch, I would expect somewhere around 50% of each party switched sides, right?
2. LBJ's party didn't even back him in equal rights. And as far as JFK, L. O. L.
3. Lincoln yes, Confederacy? When did R's claim any of the racist Democrat south's heroes? That's pathetic that you somehow think these statues are of any Republicans, and even worse, you know they're all Democrats yet you and the left are desperate to associate Republicans with your own gutter trash.

The rest of your list is quite easy to knock down. I never heard of anyone building strawmen as their actual arguments, but here you are. Go tell the socialist professor that wrote this list for you that he's a POS and should self-exile to his utopia, Venezuela.
 

zar45

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1. All of these are lower-level local reps. Look at Congress. How many changed parties? I'll let you discover that huge number of D's that switched to R's and R's that switched to D's.
Several listed individuals were Senators, Representatives, and Governors.
If it was a big switch, I would expect somewhere around 50% of each party switched sides, right?
Not necessarily, especially in an industry premised on seniority where many high ranking officials would become effective Freshmen legislators by switching.
2. LBJ's party didn't even back him in equal rights.
199 Democratic Congressmen did.
And as far as JFK, L. O. L.
One guy can say what he will, including "Frye's story underscores the fact that the real hero of forcing federal legislative change when it came to civil rights was Johnson - not Kennedy.", but the fact remains, JFK played a significant part in the CRA.
3. Lincoln yes, Confederacy? When did R's claim any of the racist Democrat south's heroes? That's pathetic that you somehow think these statues are of any Republicans, and even worse, you know they're all Democrats yet you and the left are desperate to associate Republicans with your own gutter trash.
You've misunderstood my point. Republicans are the current defenders of the relics of the Confederacy:
wYmB54x.jpg

wWEiS1o.jpg

KiwVhXq.jpg

The rest of your list is quite easy to knock down. I never heard of anyone building strawmen as their actual arguments, but here you are.
If it's quite easy to knock down it shouldn't be too much to ask for refutations to check myself.
Go tell the socialist professor that wrote this list for you that he's a POS and should self-exile to his utopia, Venezuela.
This list is personally researched and written.
 
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sklarbodds

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I think this is the 50th time we've had the "did the parties switch" debate.
 
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biscuitbagger3

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I think this is the 50th time we've had the "did the parties switch" debate.
No one even knows why it's a debate. I don't know why I feel compelled to engage @Oldschool1964 on it either. It's just well settled fact. I think what drives me to do it is his insecurity about it clearly bothers him to the point that he wants to constantly claim it's not a thing. Classic revisionist history move. Racists are gonna vote for someone, just because they vote for you doesn't make you racist.
 

Oldschool1964

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No one even knows why it's a debate. I don't know why I feel compelled to engage @Oldschool1964 on it either. It's just well settled fact. I think what drives me to do it is his insecurity about it clearly bothers him to the point that he wants to constantly claim it's not a thing. Classic revisionist history move. Racists are gonna vote for someone, just because they vote for you doesn't make you racist.
It’s total BS dreamed up by Democrats to distance themselves from their racist past. There was 1 Congressperson that switched sides during “the big switch”. One. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again, if @biscuitbagger3 thinks 1 is “big”, then his wife needs to give me a call.
 

zar45

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It’s total BS dreamed up by Democrats to distance themselves from their racist past. There was 1 Congressperson that switched sides during “the big switch”. One. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again, if @biscuitbagger3 thinks 1 is “big”, then his wife needs to give me a call.
Senator John Tower and Senator Strom Thurmond beg to differ.
 
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biscuitbagger3

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It’s total BS dreamed up by Democrats to distance themselves from their racist past. There was 1 Congressperson that switched sides during “the big switch”. One. I’ve said this before and I’ll say it again, if @biscuitbagger3 thinks 1 is “big”, then his wife needs to give me a call.
I didn’t use the words “the big switch,” nor did I talk about people already in Congress changing parties. I talk about the end of the New Deal Coalition starting with Truman and culminating with LBJ. It centered around Civil Rights legislation. I also am no more 1876 Democrat as I am a Whig.

These are just well accepted facts, sorry you think they’re not.
 

Oldschool1964

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Ah the Ole onerous criteria trying to disqualify the likes of Iris Faircloth Blitch, James D Martin, Bo Callaway, Dave Treen, Floyd Spence, and, yes, John Tower, on arbitrary technicalities.

Try Albert Watson.
All of these switched parties before or after they took their Congressional seat. Only one switched parties while they were in Congress. One. There's no arbitrary technicality - a "big switch" means that Democrats became Republicans and Republicans became Democrats, the parties switched, which didn't happen.
 

zar45

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All of these switched parties before or after they took their Congressional seat. Only one switched parties while they were in Congress. One. There's no arbitrary technicality - a "big switch" means that Democrats became Republicans and Republicans became Democrats, the parties switched, which didn't happen.

Albert Watson switched while in Congress. However, it's absolutely arbitrary to narrow it to only (1) winning candidates for (2) U.S. Congress who (3) switched (4) while in Congress, (and as others have argued (5) in the 60s).

A party is not solely it's active U.S. Congressmen. I've listed 31 public figures/political activists/politicians who publicly changed their party affiliation, many explicitly over civil rights.

If David Duke, Richard Spencer, and Nicholas Fuentes all joined the Democratic party today, were welcomed with open arms, and brought with them their followers; if the Democrats dropped BLM and CRT from their lexicon; if Black voters suddenly began voting for Republicans by 60 point margins; if suddenly Black Republican Congressmen outnumbered Black Democratic Congressman; you'd say their was a switch in the character of the two parties. That's exactly what happened from roughly 1949 to roughly 1979.
 
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