Big Ten Meeting this morning - cancelling season?

John_J_Rambo

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Now what Top Gun.. :(
now we root for the SEC and Big 12.

B1G, like most "leaders" in academia, are cowards.

should be no surprise to anyone the blue states are leading the charge in cancelling, as their universities don't seem to be able to take this seriously.

the number of 2021 returning presidents to any P5 school cancelling a season should be zero. this is an abortion.
 
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orclover

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Sounds like you need some fresh air, sunshine and to clear your head man. Maybe you've been wearing a mask too long?
Do have a response? Anything useful? Like man, maybe you all should wear masks so kids can go back to school and we can have football. Like which form of tribalism is stronger? Husker or political? If the openness of society is tied to spread of the virus, why are people continuing to push policies that not only kill people but keep the economy weaker than it need be?
 

rimsnef

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162,000 deaths / 4,980,000 cases = 0.0325 or 3.25%

Im not stating any opinion or telling you where I stand on this. Just completely objective numbers.
 
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bingo65

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"Get it down to nothing". Possibly the greatest misnomer in history. We have 2 options:

1. Get it over with quickly
2. Get it over with over an extended period of time.

Why are people resisting this? All we can do is affect the timeline.
i think this is true for a scenario that does not include any new treatments or a vaccine. If we can inch along minimizing spread as much as possible and then a reasonable treatment or vaccine comes into the picture by January or even next summer then that changes the dynamics. That would favor prolonging it. Although some would argue a certain percentage (i'm not sure of the exact percentage?) of the most vulnerable people have already been taken from us. So its possible much of the biggest damage in terms of death has already occurred. None of the doctors seem very interested in getting this over with quickly so i tend to think we should probably do what they recommend. by inching along it gives us opportunities to learn and adjust. the get it over with quickly scenario means no going back and living with the consequences even if it looks dismal from the very start
 

huntered

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162,000 deaths / 4,980,000 cases = 0.0325 or 3.25%

Im not stating any opinion or telling you where I stand on this. Just completely objective numbers.
please go back to 4th grade and touch up on percentages
or maybe it's me!
 
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orclover

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i think this is true for a scenario that does not include any new treatments or a vaccine. If we can inch along minimizing spread as much as possible and then a reasonable treatment or vaccine comes into the picture by January or even next summer then that changes the dynamics. That would favor prolonging it. Although some would argue a certain percentage (i'm not sure of the exact percentage?) of the most vulnerable people have already been taken from us. So its possible much of the biggest damage in terms of death has already occurred. None of the doctors seem very interested in getting this over with quickly so i tend to think we should probably do what they recommend. by inching along it gives us opportunities to learn and adjust. the get it over with quickly scenario means no going back and living with the consequences even if it looks dismal from the very start
The irony....If all Americans religiously wore masks in at risk situations, we sped up the testing process from 7 days to 2 days this thing would be over by November 3rd. And guess what, we wouldn't have a flu season, and we wouldn't need a vaccine. As crazy as it seems, proper mask wearing in a major panacea for this particular virus. It has traded its violence for contagiousness...you can take a small dose, take a week off and have your vaccine. This is backed up by the most modern and best science. Its great adaptation of being able to spread asymptomatically also means the body has time to respond before being overwhelmed. Let's take advantage of it.
 

Husker Sledge

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Do have a response? Anything useful? Like man, maybe you all should wear masks so kids can go back to school and we can have football. Like which form of tribalism is stronger? Husker or political? If the openness of society is tied to spread of the virus, why are people continuing to push policies that not only kill people but keep the economy weaker than it need be?
A response to what? I don't believe you ever asked me a question. Just making an observation based on the nature of your sensationalized posts. Your chances of dying on D-Day response to Suhreal's Coronovirus chart was really inappropriate. Ok? MAN!!!
 

1NebrFan

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now we root for the SEC and Big 12.

B1G, like most "leaders" in academia, are cowards.

should be no surprise to anyone the blue states are leading the charge in cancelling, as their universities don't seem to be able to take this seriously.

I could be wrong, but aren’t 9 of the 12 universities in the MAC in Ohio and Michigan? I thought that both went red in the last election....could be wrong though.
 
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Crazyhole

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The irony....If all Americans religiously wore masks in at risk situations, we sped up the testing process from 7 days to 2 days this thing would be over by November 3rd. And guess what, we wouldn't have a flu season, and we wouldn't need a vaccine. As crazy as it seems, proper mask wearing in a major panacea for this particular virus. It has traded its violence for contagiousness...you can take a small dose, take a week off and have your vaccine. This is backed up by the most modern and best science. Its great adaptation of being able to spread asymptomatically also means the body has time to respond before being overwhelmed. Let's take advantage of it.
So the virus would just amazingly disappear if we all wore masks all day every day? Can we make the whole world do that, cuz it sounds awesome. If we could all just put a mask on and not be around anybody for 6 months a lot of infectious diseases would probably go away. If we dropped the speed limit to 10 on the interstate nobody would die from a car crash either. I'm sure that neither approaches entail some kind of risk that is worthy of consideration.
 

husker2612

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No thanks I don’t want a chip put in me.Winking
Have read 2 article just today stating that Covid vaccine should be mandatory and suggested ways to legally enforce it. I will be shocked if it isn't mandatory in some form. Maybe not legally where the government says you must get it. It will be you can't go to work, go to school, get a loan, get insurance ect, basically they will make it very very difficult to function if you are not vaccinated.
 

scarletred

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Have read 2 article just today stating that Covid vaccine should be mandatory and suggested ways to legally enforce it. I will be shocked if it isn't mandatory in some form. Maybe not legally where the government says you must get it. It will be you can't go to work, go to school, get a loan, get insurance ect, basically they will make it very very difficult to function if you are not vaccinated.
They don’t even pressure you for a flu shot.. How can the government give a shot that we have no idea how it will effect everyone differently..

But in no way in hell should anyone get a microchip that controls your financial amount that you own and the government is in control which I have read that Gates who denies is proposing.
 
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spinner4

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The irony....If all Americans religiously wore masks in at risk situations, we sped up the testing process from 7 days to 2 days this thing would be over by November 3rd. And guess what, we wouldn't have a flu season, and we wouldn't need a vaccine. As crazy as it seems, proper mask wearing in a major panacea for this particular virus. It has traded its violence for contagiousness...you can take a small dose, take a week off and have your vaccine. This is backed up by the most modern and best science. Its great adaptation of being able to spread asymptomatically also means the body has time to respond before being overwhelmed. Let's take advantage of it.
But dam it if we did that the companies doing R&D on a vaccine would lose billions and the Boomers would actually have to go back to living a real life vs watching cable news all day getting worked up.
 

Huskers_Rule

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It is important to place blame in the appropriate place. The Czech republic mandated masks on March 23rd. They had 300 deaths, and are fully open in August. Southeast Asia has had compliant mask wearing since the beginning of the outbreak and are fully open in August. The pure science says that mask wearing will not completely control cases but will turn symptomatic cases into nearly 100% asymptomatic cases. Study after study has shown that mask wearing takes asymptomatic occurance from 35-40% all the way above 85%. America has 500 deaths per 1 million people whereas mask compliant nations has deaths rates that are 50x lower.

MASKS PROTECT THE INFECTED PERSON FROM BEING RESPONSIBLE FOR KILLING A HEALTHY PERSON MASK OR NO MASK! Most cloth masks have gaps or are poorly fitted. A maskless person will release <5 micrometer aerosol particles many feet away from them that can enter deep into the lungs of an unsuspecting healthy person, even if the person next to them has a mask. This is purely a social experiment to see if an American will wear a mask to protect a neighbor or fellow American. If you want to protect yourself you need a very well fitted triple layer mask that stays dry.

The U.S has an uncontrolled outbreak where the hotspots are arbitrary and unpredictable. Our population has unequivocally acted like children the last 5 months and we are having our toys taken away. Omaha closing schools is a direct reflection of the resistance to a mask mandate and careless behavior of the society. Lincoln as a counter, will have schools open, with compliant mask wearing, because the population has, for the moment, kept the virus as levels 2x lower than their neighbor.

If you are a nationalist, you should be terrified because the vast majority of the world is moving on, their economies are learning to function without America, their militaries are adapting to a world where the U.S is castrated by a virus outbreak. The consensus won't be that China handled this well, many nations are pissed at the CCP, but it will be that America is a joke, that their population is ignorant, petulant, self-serving, and regardless of federal leadership the population as a whole cannot function in a coherent unified manner...relative to other nations. Our adversaries are certainly taking note.
This is ridiculous. Look at how Sweden has done with no lock down. The UN estimates 130 MILLION people no face starvation by the end of 2020 because of lock downs.
It is important to place blame in the appropriate place. The Czech republic mandated masks on March 23rd. They had 300 deaths, and are fully open in August. Southeast Asia has had compliant mask wearing since the beginning of the outbreak and are fully open in August. The pure science says that mask wearing will not completely control cases but will turn symptomatic cases into nearly 100% asymptomatic cases. Study after study has shown that mask wearing takes asymptomatic occurance from 35-40% all the way above 85%. America has 500 deaths per 1 million people whereas mask compliant nations has deaths rates that are 50x lower.

MASKS PROTECT THE INFECTED PERSON FROM BEING RESPONSIBLE FOR KILLING A HEALTHY PERSON MASK OR NO MASK! Most cloth masks have gaps or are poorly fitted. A maskless person will release <5 micrometer aerosol particles many feet away from them that can enter deep into the lungs of an unsuspecting healthy person, even if the person next to them has a mask. This is purely a social experiment to see if an American will wear a mask to protect a neighbor or fellow American. If you want to protect yourself you need a very well fitted triple layer mask that stays dry.

The U.S has an uncontrolled outbreak where the hotspots are arbitrary and unpredictable. Our population has unequivocally acted like children the last 5 months and we are having our toys taken away. Omaha closing schools is a direct reflection of the resistance to a mask mandate and careless behavior of the society. Lincoln as a counter, will have schools open, with compliant mask wearing, because the population has, for the moment, kept the virus as levels 2x lower than their neighbor.

If you are a nationalist, you should be terrified because the vast majority of the world is moving on, their economies are learning to function without America, their militaries are adapting to a world where the U.S is castrated by a virus outbreak. The consensus won't be that China handled this well, many nations are pissed at the CCP, but it will be that America is a joke, that their population is ignorant, petulant, self-serving, and regardless of federal leadership the population as a whole cannot function in a coherent unified manner...relative to other nations. Our adversaries are certainly taking note.
But bruh it was SO worth it to protest, riot and plunder.
 
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Crazyhole

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Have read 2 article just today stating that Covid vaccine should be mandatory and suggested ways to legally enforce it. I will be shocked if it isn't mandatory in some form. Maybe not legally where the government says you must get it. It will be you can't go to work, go to school, get a loan, get insurance ect, basically they will make it very very difficult to function if you are not vaccinated.
Seems like I've heard this story before.
 

Huskers_Rule

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162,000 deaths / 4,980,000 cases = 0.0325 or 3.25%

Im not stating any opinion or telling you where I stand on this. Just completely objective numbers.
Don't do numbers, if you did you would have to look at the fact 250 THOUSAND Americans die each year from medical mistakes. Given the current climate no one should seek medial care.
 

Huskers_Rule

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the protestors had magical dust. Don’t you know that?
It is truly a woke virus. The medical "experts" lost me completely when they penned that letter that stated protesting, rioting and looting for Mr. Floyd was good and would not cause the virus to spread and that protesting lock downs was bad, would spread the virus and evidence of white supremacy. They showed without a doubt this is NOT a serious deal. If we can riot with virtue then we can play football, go to school and work.
 

spinner4

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It is truly a woke virus. The medical "experts" lost me completely when they penned that letter that stated protesting, rioting and looting for Mr. Floyd was good and would not cause the virus to spread and that protesting lock downs was bad, would spread the virus and evidence of white supremacy. They showed without a doubt this is NOT a serious deal. If we can riot with virtue then we can play football, go to school and work.
Yeah, my favorite part of the hypocrisy was last month it was all “listen to Doctors, listen to the CDC”... CDC says it’s healthier for kids to be back in school - news “CDC is lying due to pressure from Trump... don’t listen to the CDC”

Now lots of Dr support hydroxycholoquine as a method for treatment and journalists now saying don’t listen to doctors.

my favorite was this week when John Berman has a fight with a Yale Medical doctor his week.

unless Dr. Fauci (the man continually doesn’t wear a mask) or CNN says it’s ok, it’s not ok
 

Nebraska_Reality

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This is ridiculous. Look at how Sweden has done with no lock down. The UN estimates 130 MILLION people no face starvation by the end of 2020 because of lock downs.


But bruh it was SO worth it to protest, riot and plunder.
I can't believe I have to do this again........

Deaths per Million People from COVID 19
Sweden- 570
USA- 487
Denmark- 106
Finland- 59
Norway- 47
Iceland- 29

You should also read up on Sweden's response; far different than ours in a number of ways....and not the public "freedom fest" you seem to think it was:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/COVID-19_pandemic_in_Sweden
 

John_J_Rambo

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Very sad if true. But I think it is inevitable. Damn this virus and damn those who haven’t taken it seriously and have caused the United States to be the Covid hot spot of the world.
agreed. if you're obese, look in the mirror now.

and thanks a lot.

signed-
responsible citizens.
 

jlb321

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my favorite was this week when John Berman has a fight with a Yale Medical doctor his week.ok
the ID doctor’s at Yale have come out and said they support his right of free speech but that he doesn’t know what he is talking about ...



As his colleagues, we defend the right of Dr. Risch, a respected cancer epidemiologist, to voice his opinions. But he is not an expert in infectious disease epidemiology and he has not been swayed by the body of scientific evidence from rigorously conducted clinical trials, which refute the plausibility of his belief and arguments.

Pretty sure as a cancer epidemiologist he has never treated a case of COVID-19

 
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spinner4

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that doctor’s entire division at Yale have come out and said they support his right of free speech but that he doesn’t know what he is talking about ...

Wow what an impressive list. So glad they got a economics professor, a law professor, and many other irrelevant professors to sign that. Of course they did have some in the know ones too. And I don’t know if hydroxycholoquine is an answer. That’s not my point. My point being is Berman is not a point of reference nor is an economics professor. But I do work with a lot of physicians that fight cancer and their opinions very a lot. That’s what doctors do on things that don’t have a cure for.

But on second thought maybe there’s a reason an economic professor is the first one to sign that letter
 

jlb321

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But on second thought maybe there’s a reason an economic professor is the first one to sign that letter
there is a reason .... his last name starts we “A”. They are listed in alphabetical order RollingLaugh

the list and their credentials:


Jason Abaluck, PhD

Associate Professor of Economics

Yale School of Management

Amy Bei, PhD

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health

Theodore Cohen, MD, DPH

Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Co-director, Public Health Modeling Concentration

Yale School of Public Health

Gary V. Desir, MD

Paul B. Beeson Professor of Medicine

Vice Provost, Faculty Development and Diversity

Chair, Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine

Chief, Internal Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital

Gail D’Onofrio MD

Professor & Chair, Emergency Medicine

Yale School of Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Howard P. Forman, MD, MBA

Professor of Radiology & Public Health (Health Policy)

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Medicine

Professor in the Practice of Management

Yale School of Management

Alison Galvani, PhD

Burnett and Stender Families Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis (CIDMA)

Yale School of Public Health

Gregg Gonsalves, PhD

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health

Associate Professor (Adjunct) and Research Scholar

Yale Law School

Nathan D. Grubaugh, PhD

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health

Roberta Hines, MD

Nicholas M. Greene Professor & Chair of Anesthesiology

Yale School of Medicine

Valerie Horsley, PhD

Associate Professor of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology

Yale University

Akiko Iwasaki, PhD

Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Yale School of Medicine

Professor of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology

Yale University

Amy Kapczynski, JD

Professor of Law

Yale Law School

Trace Kershaw, PhD

Department Chair and Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences)
Yale School of Public Health

Albert I. Ko, MD

Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine and Chair of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases

Yale School of Public Health

Stephen R. Latham, JD, PhD

Director, Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics

Yale University

Brett Lindenbach, PhD

Associate Professor, Microbial Pathogenesis

Yale School of Medicine

Fiona Scott Morton, PhD

Theodore Nierenberg Professor of Economics

Yale School of Management

Ruslan Medzhitov, PhD

Sterling Professor of Immunobiology

Yale School of Medicine

Saad B. Omer, MBBS MPH PhD FIDSA

Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases),Yale School of Medicine

Adjunct Professor, Yale School of Nursing

Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health

A. David Paltiel, PhD

Professor of Health Policy & Management

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Management

Sunil Parikh, MD, MPH

Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Medicine

Karen Santucci, MD

Professor & Chief, Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Yale School of Medicine

Marcella Nunez Smith, MD, MHS

Associate Professor, General Internal Medicine, Public Health, and Management

Yale School of Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Management

Director, Equity Research and Innovation Center

Daniel Weinberger, PhD

Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health
 

spinner4

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there is a reason .... his last name starts we “A”. They are listed in alphabetical order RollingLaugh

the list and their credentials:


Jason Abaluck, PhD

Associate Professor of Economics

Yale School of Management

Amy Bei, PhD

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health

Theodore Cohen, MD, DPH

Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Co-director, Public Health Modeling Concentration

Yale School of Public Health

Gary V. Desir, MD

Paul B. Beeson Professor of Medicine

Vice Provost, Faculty Development and Diversity

Chair, Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine

Chief, Internal Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital

Gail D’Onofrio MD

Professor & Chair, Emergency Medicine

Yale School of Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Howard P. Forman, MD, MBA

Professor of Radiology & Public Health (Health Policy)

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Medicine

Professor in the Practice of Management

Yale School of Management

Alison Galvani, PhD

Burnett and Stender Families Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Director of the Center for Infectious Disease Modeling and Analysis (CIDMA)

Yale School of Public Health

Gregg Gonsalves, PhD

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health

Associate Professor (Adjunct) and Research Scholar

Yale Law School

Nathan D. Grubaugh, PhD

Assistant Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health

Roberta Hines, MD

Nicholas M. Greene Professor & Chair of Anesthesiology

Yale School of Medicine

Valerie Horsley, PhD

Associate Professor of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology

Yale University

Akiko Iwasaki, PhD

Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Immunobiology and Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Yale School of Medicine

Professor of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology

Yale University

Amy Kapczynski, JD

Professor of Law

Yale Law School

Trace Kershaw, PhD

Department Chair and Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Public Health (Social and Behavioral Sciences)
Yale School of Public Health

Albert I. Ko, MD

Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine and Chair of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases

Yale School of Public Health

Stephen R. Latham, JD, PhD

Director, Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics

Yale University

Brett Lindenbach, PhD

Associate Professor, Microbial Pathogenesis

Yale School of Medicine

Fiona Scott Morton, PhD

Theodore Nierenberg Professor of Economics

Yale School of Management

Ruslan Medzhitov, PhD

Sterling Professor of Immunobiology

Yale School of Medicine

Saad B. Omer, MBBS MPH PhD FIDSA

Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases),Yale School of Medicine

Adjunct Professor, Yale School of Nursing

Susan Dwight Bliss Professor of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health

A. David Paltiel, PhD

Professor of Health Policy & Management

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Management

Sunil Parikh, MD, MPH

Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Medicine

Karen Santucci, MD

Professor & Chief, Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Yale School of Medicine

Marcella Nunez Smith, MD, MHS

Associate Professor, General Internal Medicine, Public Health, and Management

Yale School of Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Management

Director,

Daniel Weinberger, PhD

Associate Professor of Epidemiology (Microbial Diseases)

Yale School of Public Health
Haha RollingLaugh. It’s still a lot of irrelevant sources. An obviously it’s alphabetical. The part of a economic professor signing it first was sort of a joke. It’s just kind of funny that the first source you see is an economics professor

My favorite source though has to be the Director of Equity Research and Innovation Center...

which is my entire point. Why should I care what an Equity research director has to say about this?
 
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jlb321

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Haha RollingLaugh. It’s still a lot of irrelevant sources.

My favorite source though has to be the Director of Equity Research and Innovation Center...

which is my entire point. Why should I cars what an Equity research director has to say about this?
you conveniently left off all her other relevant qualifications

Marcella Nunez Smith, MD, MHS

Associate Professor, General Internal Medicine, Public Health, and Management

Yale School of Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Management

Director, Equity Research and Innovation Center

plus (with some redundancy)


Biography
Dr. Nunez-Smith is Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Public Health, and Management; Founding Director of the Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC); Director of the Center for Research Engagement (CRE); Deputy Director of the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation; Core Faculty in the National Clinician Scholars Program; Research Faculty in the Global Health Leadership Initiative; Director of the Pozen-Commonwealth Fund Fellowship in Health Equity Leadership; and Co-Director of the Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship.
 

spinner4

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you conveniently left off all her other relevant qualifications

Marcella Nunez Smith, MD, MHS

Associate Professor, General Internal Medicine, Public Health, and Management

Yale School of Medicine

Yale School of Public Health

Yale School of Management

Director, Equity Research and Innovation Center

plus (with some redundancy)


Biography
Dr. Nunez-Smith is Associate Professor of Internal Medicine, Public Health, and Management; Founding Director of the Equity Research and Innovation Center (ERIC); Director of the Center for Research Engagement (CRE); Deputy Director of the Yale Center for Clinical Investigation; Core Faculty in the National Clinician Scholars Program; Research Faculty in the Global Health Leadership Initiative; Director of the Pozen-Commonwealth Fund Fellowship in Health Equity Leadership; and Co-Director of the Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship.
No that’s not fair or true. I did say there’s people in the “know” on the list. Just find it odd that they have so many irrelevant people on the list. Almost like they want you to see a lot of PHDs on a long list so that you buy people’s like Dr Smiths opinion more. Again, I don’t even know if that hydroxycholoquine is an opinion. THATS NOT THE POINT and never was
 

TampaBaySkers

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Let’s try to get back on topic. Have any conferences discussed possible bubbles? NHL and NBA have ran pretty smoothly. I understand these are student athletes, but I don’t think there is any reason they have to be physically in class. Probably not very realistic, but I wanna watch watch some college football this fall.
 

jrhuskerdad

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This type of comment is trash. The type of heroism required to run into the spray of bullets on D-Day should carry enough reverence to keep their unfathomable sacrifice out of any bullshit talking point on a football forum.
Don’t act so surprised. Nothing is sacred anymore. We now take our cues from leaders who say things like: “I like war heroes who weren’t captured” when they have a fundamental disagreement with one of our country’s greatest patriots.
 

jlb321

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No that’s not fair or true. I did say there’s people in the “know” on the list. Just find it odd that they have so many irrelevant people on the list. Almost like they want you to see a lot of PHDs on a long list so that you buy people’s like Dr Smiths opinion more. Again, I don’t even know if that hydroxycholoquine is an opinion. THATS NOT THE POINT and never was
the evidence gold standard of any therapeutic intervention are randomized controlled trials

There have been 7 or 8 of them in all different circumstances (ICU-inpatient-outpatient-postexposure prophylaxis) - every single one of them showed no benefit with HCQ

It’s not opinion .... it’s evidence - which is why the letter states scientific evidence from rigorously conducted clinical trials, which refute the plausibility of his belief and arguments

Dr Risch is welcome to do a randomized controlled trial to prove his convictions - but he knows he doesn’t have to in order to get a bunch of social media and media attention by just making claims that aren’t backed up by any credible evidence.
 

hedonistimpulse

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Don’t act so surprised. Nothing is sacred anymore. We now take our cues from leaders who say things like: “I like war heroes who weren’t captured” when they have a fundamental disagreement with one of our country’s greatest patriots.
I'm not disagreeing with what you're saying, but I'm going to go way out on a limb here and say the young person I was talking to is not a big fan of President Trump and isn't taking cues from him. I've misread the room a time or two before, but I feel confident in saying that.
 

artguy68

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the evidence gold standard of any therapeutic intervention are randomized controlled trials

There have been 7 or 8 of them in all different circumstances (ICU-inpatient-outpatient-postexposure prophylaxis) - every single one of them showed no benefit with HCQ

It’s not opinion .... it’s evidence - which is why the letter states scientific evidence from rigorously conducted clinical trials, which refute the plausibility of his belief and arguments

Dr Risch is welcome to do a randomized controlled trial to prove his convictions - but he knows he doesn’t have to in order to get a bunch of social media and media attention by just making claims that aren’t backed up by any credible evidence.
Bravo! Thank you for sharing actual knowledge on this board. It is a rare thing.
 
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Nebraska_Reality

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Let’s try to get back on topic. Have any conferences discussed possible bubbles? NHL and NBA have ran pretty smoothly. I understand these are student athletes, but I don’t think there is any reason they have to be physically in class. Probably not very realistic, but I wanna watch watch some college football this fall.
I think the bubble ship has sailed at this point.

The purpose of the University of Nebraska's existence is to educate, not provide entertainment to people...the majority of whom didn't even attend the school.
 

jrhuskerdad

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I'm not disagreeing with what you're saying, but I'm going to go way out on a limb here and say the young man or woman I was talking to is not a big fan of President Trump and isn't taking his cues from him. I've misread the room a time or two before, but I feel confident in saying that.
That’s probably true; however, a President sets the bar for what is acceptable behavior for all citizens whether they are supporters or not. The rhetoric is unbearable in this country and it starts at the highest level. With all that said, I agree with your initial assessment that there are some things that should be off limits.
 
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spinner4

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the evidence gold standard of any therapeutic intervention are randomized controlled trials

There have been 7 or 8 of them in all different circumstances (ICU-inpatient-outpatient-postexposure prophylaxis) - every single one of them showed no benefit with HCQ

It’s not opinion .... it’s evidence - which is why the letter states scientific evidence from rigorously conducted clinical trials, which refute the plausibility of his belief and arguments

Dr Risch is welcome to do a randomized controlled trial to prove his convictions - but he knows he doesn’t have to in order to get a bunch of social media and media attention by just making claims that aren’t backed up by any credible evidence.
Man I’m leaving this here, but I want to be loud and clear. I am not a doctor. I have zero experience in research on cures for viruses. hydroxycholoquine Could work or it couldn’t (and that’s actually what your cite even says... see below) But I have no insight. Like I’ve said all thru our posts, I don’t know and that’s not my original complaint on John Berman. My issue on Berman, is he had zero credibility to attack Dr Risch research when a) he is not a doctor and B) didn’t have one present to cite. berman was the judge, jury, and executioner. Journalism is my problem. People believing journalists are experts in areas they truly aren’t is my problem. And it’s effecting the way of life in more than just COVID.

Important part on HCQ in your cite “If HCQ was shown to be effective, even among subgroups of patients with COVID-19 in ongoing high quality trials, we would join our colleagues in promoting access to it for all who need it. However, the evidence thus far has been unambiguous in refuting the premise that HCQ is a potentially effective early therapy for COVID-19.”
 
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