Biden EO on Cybersecurity

zar45

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I'm no cybersecurity expert, but requiring cyberbreach reporting, zero trust architecture, multifactor authentication, and publicly available baseline standards for government software all seem like good steps with trickle-down effects in the private sector.


 

Oldschool1964

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I'm no cybersecurity expert, but requiring cyberbreach reporting, zero trust architecture, multifactor authentication, and publicly available baseline standards for government software all seem like good steps with trickle-down effects in the private sector.


Yeah, I’m sure Joe knows one of those words...
 

zar45

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Yeah, I’m sure Joe knows one of those words...

I'm sure he was briefed on, and understands, the pros and cons. Other than that, does it matter? Apparently a competent group of individuals has been tapped by Biden and produced an EO acceptable to Biden and Biden is making the EO actionable. Seems to me an example of the President Presiding.
 

Jaemekon

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I'm sure he was briefed on, and understands, the pros and cons. Other than that, does it matter? Apparently a competent group of individuals has been tapped by Biden and produced an EO acceptable to Biden and Biden is making the EO actionable. Seems to me an example of the President Presiding.

71Am1MM-aOL._SS500_.jpg


This is the, "Tap that Ass" album.
 

sklarbodds

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I'm sure he was briefed on, and understands, the pros and cons. Other than that, does it matter? Apparently a competent group of individuals has been tapped by Biden and produced an EO acceptable to Biden and Biden is making the EO actionable. Seems to me an example of the President Presiding.
That's how it should be, listen to experts, help them accomplish their goals
 

Oldschool1964

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I'm sure he was briefed on, and understands, the pros and cons. Other than that, does it matter? Apparently a competent group of individuals has been tapped by Biden and produced an EO acceptable to Biden and Biden is making the EO actionable. Seems to me an example of the President Presiding.
OOOOrrrr, special interests created the EO to give no-bid contracts to vendors to sell and install hardware and software to bring the fed up to speed on security costing 10x as much and 10x less effective than the top companies on the market.
 

Oldschool1964

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That's quite the theory. Anything to back it up?
My scenario is much more plausible than an EO "led" by Biden regarding internet security is free of any special interest. Depending on who the "private-sector official" is, I could be spot on.
"The review board created under the executive order will be co-led by the secretary of homeland security and a private-sector official, based on the specific episode it is investigating at the time, in an effort to win over industry executives who fear the investigations could be fodder for lawsuits."
 

realbp

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All OUT on Frost
OOOOrrrr, special interests created the EO to give no-bid contracts to vendors to sell and install hardware and software to bring the fed up to speed on security costing 10x as much and 10x less effective than the top companies on the market.

My scenario is much more plausible than an EO "led" by Biden regarding internet security is free of any special interest. Depending on who the "private-sector official" is, I could be spot on.
"The review board created under the executive order will be co-led by the secretary of homeland security and a private-sector official, based on the specific episode it is investigating at the time, in an effort to win over industry executives who fear the investigations could be fodder for lawsuits."
It has to be exhausting to continue to come up with theories that undermine good policy just because there were very few to claim during the last administration.
 
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zar45

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OOOOrrrr, special interests created the EO to give no-bid contracts to vendors to sell and install hardware and software to bring the fed up to speed on security costing 10x as much and 10x less effective than the top companies on the market.

Is anybody, in your mind, not a special interest?
 
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sklarbodds

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Is anybody, in your mind, not a special interest?
That's a good question...because guess what...if you're going to hire someone who is going to advise you on something like this they have to be an expert and that means they work in the field and that means they're special interest?
 
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zar45

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That's a good question...because guess what...if you're going to hire someone who is going to advise you on something like this they have to be an expert and that means they work in the field and that means they're special interest?
Exactly. the "special interest" label sticks to virtually any qualified party.
 

Hardlyboy

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Flashback to 2012 when pubs blocked a cyber security bill that would’ve helped prevent things like this.

Gen. Keith Alexander, head of the National Security Agency, and Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, were among those who pressed for a White House-backed cyber-security bill to regulate privately owned crucial infrastructure, such as electric utilities, chemical plants and water systems.

Democrats overwhelmingly supported the legislation, but for Republicans, it meant a stark choice between competing constituencies: national security officials and business leaders. Even after the bill’s backers made the standards voluntary, the Chamber of Commerce, which spends more on lobbying than any other trade group, opposed it.

 
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IowaHuskerFan3

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I'm no cybersecurity expert, but requiring cyberbreach reporting, zero trust architecture, multifactor authentication, and publicly available baseline standards for government software all seem like good steps with trickle-down effects in the private sector.


Kinda like shutting the gate after the horses got out
 
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HUSKERinLA

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I'm no cybersecurity expert, but requiring cyberbreach reporting, zero trust architecture, multifactor authentication, and publicly available baseline standards for government software all seem like good steps with trickle-down effects in the private sector.


Biden is the shit! He's killing it!
 

nelsonj22

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Yeah, I’m sure Joe knows one of those words...
To be honest no president in probably 100 years has written their EO, they say to some smart person "what do we need to do" and then the paralegals write it up.
 
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jja699

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Lol none of them old farts even know what a computer is, hardly cyber security. My brother worked in this field and we were behind the 8 ball 15 years ago. Most people in the higher ups don’t understand it. All they see is it costing money to up grade systems all the time. That pipeline company was running a 10 year old system. We wonder why China is flying Jets that look like ours or have stolen so much from companies.
 
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Thanks for sharing the links. Also, I am not a cyber expert, but for sure, they will need one. In such situations is crucial to be all safe and secure. I agree with one of you that your side that they don't even know what a computer is, haha. To be an expert in this domain, you have to have a lot of years of practice. Better they will ask for the help of a company of specialists. Even me who did the university in IT, I am not an expert in the cyber field. When I have some doubts about my security on my computer or another issue, I call an expert at cyber security. This is the easiest and safest way.
 
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drubendall

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I'm no cybersecurity expert, but requiring cyberbreach reporting, zero trust architecture, multifactor authentication, and publicly available baseline standards for government software all seem like good steps with trickle-down effects in the private sector.


They put a red sticker on the paper with an arrow next to a blank line. Joe, you can sign your name next to the red sticker can't you? We'll get ice cream afterwards
 

lolwat

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Good on the administration for this one. Good paying jobs probably getting created out of it. Some of the stuff they are rattling off has been 'best practice' for a bit but its just a matter of doing it, and getting buy in.

It might get interesting when quantum computing is a thing, relative to encryption and block chains.